Patriots Local News:

SOURCE:Boston Globe


SOURCE:unionleader.com


SOURCE:wpri.com


SOURCE:Boston Globe


SOURCE:Providence Journal


SOURCE:CBS Boston


SOURCE:USA TODAY


SOURCE:Boston Globe


SOURCE:USA TODAY


SOURCE:USA TODAY


SOURCE:NBC Sports Boston


SOURCE:NBC Sports Boston


SOURCE:Boston Globe


SOURCE:USA TODAY


SOURCE:al.com


SOURCE:Providence Journal


SOURCE:metrowestdailynews.com


SOURCE:al.com


SOURCE:NESN


SOURCE:WEEI


SOURCE:WEEI


SOURCE:98.5 The Sports Hub


SOURCE:Yahoo! Sports


SOURCE:Boston.com


SOURCE:NESN

Patsfans.com

Upcoming Opponent:
Next Up: Dolphins
Sun
Sep 13th

Current Patriots Twitter Feed:

Opt-Outs

Discussion in 'PatsFans.com - Patriots Fan Forum' started by PatsFanInVa, Jul 30, 2020.

  1. venecol

    venecol The FRG has a little **** PatsFans.com Supporter

    Joined:
    Aug 16, 2015
    Messages:
    7,550
    Likes Received:
    1,358
    Ratings:
    +9,445
    Agree. This is what I always felt would be the issue, not fear of dying but of having a career ending illness. Not sure if an athlete can withstand even a 10% reduction in lung capacity or some heart condition.
     
    • Agree Agree x 2
    • Useful Useful x 1
  2. JetFan79

    JetFan79 PatsFans.com Supporter PatsFans.com Supporter Weekly Picks Winner

    Joined:
    Mar 24, 2015
    Messages:
    3,838
    Likes Received:
    643
    Ratings:
    +4,179
    More details...

    As for Mosley’s contract, it will “toll,” based on the agreement between the NFL and the NFLPA, which means he still will have four years remaining when he returns next season. It will run through 2024, instead of 2023.

    The Jets also will get some salary-cap flexibility this year and next. Mosley was paid a $10 million roster bonus for this year. His $6 million base salary and $1.5 million pro-rated signing bonus shouldn’t count against the cap. Next year, Mosley only will count for about $7.5 million instead of $17.5 million as his roster bonus already has been paid.
     
  3. SlowGettingUp

    SlowGettingUp Third String But Playing on Special Teams

    Joined:
    Jan 11, 2015
    Messages:
    888
    Likes Received:
    536
    Ratings:
    +2,034
    Pats are the oldest team in the NFL. Older guys are more at risk, have already made a pile of money and bunch of them already have rings. We needed to get younger anyhow - this will accelerate the process.
     
  4. RASTAN99

    RASTAN99 Practice Squad Player

    Joined:
    Jun 28, 2020
    Messages:
    136
    Likes Received:
    12
    Ratings:
    +73
    Is he? Does he?

    As for the numbers you cite....not even a drop in the global swimming pool with a population of 7,594,000,000.

    To quote Andy Dufresne, "get busy living or get busy dying"...

    ...as a free American you are allowed the choice.
     
    • Dislike Dislike x 4
    • Agree Agree x 1
    • Winner Winner x 1
  5. JetFan79

    JetFan79 PatsFans.com Supporter PatsFans.com Supporter Weekly Picks Winner

    Joined:
    Mar 24, 2015
    Messages:
    3,838
    Likes Received:
    643
    Ratings:
    +4,179
    Yup.

    And it's not easy for a Jet fan to say a Pats fan is intelligent.
     
    • Thank You Thank You x 1
  6. RASTAN99

    RASTAN99 Practice Squad Player

    Joined:
    Jun 28, 2020
    Messages:
    136
    Likes Received:
    12
    Ratings:
    +73
    • Dislike Dislike x 3
  7. RASTAN99

    RASTAN99 Practice Squad Player

    Joined:
    Jun 28, 2020
    Messages:
    136
    Likes Received:
    12
    Ratings:
    +73
    Opting IN and putting "families at risk" are not mutually inclusive conditions.
     
    • Dislike Dislike x 3
    • Agree Agree x 1
    • Maybe Not... Maybe Not... x 1
    • Winner Winner x 1
  8. mgteich

    mgteich PatsFans.com Veteran PatsFans.com Supporter

    Joined:
    Sep 13, 2004
    Messages:
    31,958
    Likes Received:
    2,717
    Ratings:
    +11,532
    Certainly not if they don't lose their salary if they stay home.

    Consider if an individual with limited long-term skills were offered a 6 month job in Saudi Arabia for $2M. Should he go if he has to leave his family for that time. How about $3M.

    Let's be serious. I well understand players at risk not wanting to risk their lives. Cannon is certainly an example. However, those who are staying home because of their families wouldn't make sense if a player weren't being paid. After all, it is reasonable not to be in the presence of at-risk family members for a few months if the reason is that the player needs to make millions in one his last opportunities.
     
    • Agree Agree x 1
  9. RASTAN99

    RASTAN99 Practice Squad Player

    Joined:
    Jun 28, 2020
    Messages:
    136
    Likes Received:
    12
    Ratings:
    +73
    For now I'll take your word for it.

    PS...you're not alone.
     
    • Like Like x 1
    Last edited: Aug 2, 2020
  10. mgteich

    mgteich PatsFans.com Veteran PatsFans.com Supporter

    Joined:
    Sep 13, 2004
    Messages:
    31,958
    Likes Received:
    2,717
    Ratings:
    +11,532
    1) A player needn't put his family at risk. He could make believe he had a job overseas and not see them for a few months, and make his millions for his family.

    2) A player could be tested and see certain of his family WHO AREN"T AT HIGH risk somewhere other than home where folks are all tested.

    3) If no one in the home is at high risk, then the player can do what the health care providers do. The player would have a through cleaning and test before going home and put all clothes in the wash when he arrived home, and then took a shower.

    Opting out for the sake of family is to say that the player chooses not to play, the compensation for playing simply isn't worth the both of protective measures or staying away from family.

    BOTTOM LINE
    Some players are fine with collecting his 202o salary in 2021 and is willing to put aside bonuses that are not likely to be reached.
     
  11. Twentytothree

    Twentytothree Practice Squad Player

    Joined:
    Sep 14, 2008
    Messages:
    152
    Likes Received:
    63
    Ratings:
    +264
    With 600000 dead "not even a drop", how many deaths would you call significant?

    "as a free American" do you also have the choice to directly endanger health and life of others? How about drunk driving, should that be a choice as well? After all, "drop in a pool" COVID-19 kills more people in the US in a week than drunk driving in an average year. Maybe if people are afraid of getting killed by a drunk driver they should just stay home so that others can get busy living?

    Just curious how expansive your view of your individual freedoms is.
     
    • Winner Winner x 5
  12. RASTAN99

    RASTAN99 Practice Squad Player

    Joined:
    Jun 28, 2020
    Messages:
    136
    Likes Received:
    12
    Ratings:
    +73
    Very.

    If you feel cowering in the basement is the best course of action for yourself and anyone/everyone else you have influence over --- cower away, it's your right as a free American.

    The rest of of will continue to get busy living...
     
    • Dislike Dislike x 2
  13. DarrylS

    DarrylS PatsFans.com Supporter PatsFans.com Supporter Weekly Picks Winner

    Joined:
    Sep 13, 2004
    Messages:
    57,723
    Likes Received:
    3,327
    Ratings:
    +12,115
    + 1.9 million new COVID-19 cases in July in the US

    Eduardo Rodriguez out for the season and possibly forever due to heart complications from this virus

    Matthew Stafford has tested positive, his wife had brain surgery in the last year, if so would she be considered a "vulnerable population"??

    These young men, despite their age, are vulnerable due to the way the game is played.

    Still do not see an NFL season this year.. all of which is going on is much bigger than football.
     
    • Agree Agree x 4
    • Interesting Interesting x 1
  14. Twentytothree

    Twentytothree Practice Squad Player

    Joined:
    Sep 14, 2008
    Messages:
    152
    Likes Received:
    63
    Ratings:
    +264
    I understand of course that your post is facetious, but if you were actually interested in an answer, this article in Sciencemag would be a good start:
    From ‘brain fog’ to heart damage, COVID-19’s lingering problems alarm scientists | Science | AAAS

    Given that the pandemic only hit many places in full force 4 months ago, studies of long-term effects are just at the beginning (as outlined in the article). There are a number early studies showing a vast array of damage (some of them quoted in the article) and other viral illnesses of similar severity are known to have long-lasting effects for some. Given the uncertainty, it seems prudent to avoid going down a path that would leave millions with permanent health problems, in addition to a hundreds of thousand dead.
     
    • Winner Winner x 5
  15. Twentytothree

    Twentytothree Practice Squad Player

    Joined:
    Sep 14, 2008
    Messages:
    152
    Likes Received:
    63
    Ratings:
    +264
    Well, I used my "right as a free American" to move my family to a place where there hasn't been a case of community transmission in three months. I'm mildly surprised by people like you measuring their freedom by your ability to disregard other people's health, life and liberty (and the apparent pride in that disregard). But at least for now it doesn't affect me or the people I care about most, other than my tax dollars paying for your stupidity.
     
    • Love Love x 2
    • Like Like x 1
    • Thank You Thank You x 1
  16. betterthanthealternative

    betterthanthealternative PatsFans.com Supporter PatsFans.com Supporter

    Joined:
    Aug 27, 2006
    Messages:
    6,875
    Likes Received:
    1,865
    Ratings:
    +8,366
    The similarity is in the shared breathing space. That's 99% of the ball game. Many people are infected and show no symptoms, and don't test positive, for days. Physical activity in close proximity will guarantee the spread. And once a player in a "pod" of players is infected, the entire pod will be infected before the testing catches it.

    Health care workers with full N99 and plastic face shield PPE are still 3 times more likely to get the virus than the average citizen, just because they are in proximity to someone who has it. And "clean all the surfaces" has proven to be largely a waste of time (it is for some, emotionally soothing, however, to spend all that time wiping and spraying).
     
    • Thank You Thank You x 1
    • Useful Useful x 1
  17. luuked

    luuked Pro Bowl Player

    Joined:
    Jan 26, 2014
    Messages:
    18,424
    Likes Received:
    6,533
    Ratings:
    +34,697
    People underestimate how big the droplet cloud is that everyone exhales. When you get indoor, work out and have multiple maybe asymptomatic carriers who spread it around breathing deeply it is not difficult to imagine that it could spread pretty quickly around a group of people.

    Lets keep in mind that daily testing will only happen for the first two weeks of camp. Afterwards they will only return to it if the positivity rate hits above 5%.

    I don't see it as particularly difficult to imagine scenarios where any team will have a cluster of infections.
     
    • Agree Agree x 1
  18. PatsFanInVa

    PatsFanInVa PatsFans.com Supporter PatsFans.com Supporter

    Joined:
    Mar 19, 2006
    Messages:
    29,880
    Likes Received:
    3,148
    Ratings:
    +11,670
    So, not even any pretend math on the airline travel claim.

    Just an acknowledgement that there are more than 7 billion people on Earth -- again, fun with numerators and denominators, the statistical game for all ages!

    Add to that ignorance of subject matter - conflating airline travel with all (fixed wing) air traffic - which matters in a world where deaths in regularly scheduled passenger aviation are a tiny (sometimes nonexistent) fraction of deaths in air traffic. Just for fun. Not that the initial claim isn't laughably silly for the subject we're discussing here, an infectious disease.

    The denominator in airline travel has probably shrunk this year, but that's of virtually insignificant importance.

    It has shrunk by a factor of perhaps 20 - i.e., there were single-quarter reports of a 95% decrease.

    By comparison, the growth in known COVID-19 infections have gone from 0 to 18 million+ (global number) since (I believe) December '19. Certainly, the first known infection first happened within the last single year.

    More fun with statistics! That's an increase not by a factor of 20, like the decrease reported in one quarter of airline travel... but of 18,000,000.

    At this writing:
    There are 18 million more cases than there were at the first infection, a growth factor of 18 million since the first infection.

    That said, we know of 18 million cases globally at this writing.

    Of these, 689,000 have died, and 11.3 million have recovered.

    We can always add our guesses of how many we'd like to believe are infected but their infections unknown.

    The same numbers for the U.S. are:
    United States Coronavirus: 4,765,155 Cases and 157,921 Deaths - Worldometer
    4.7 million known cases
    157K known COVID-19 deaths
    ~2.4 million recovered.

    Multiply these numbers by 18 million, and of course, they become meaningless. If the world population and the U.S. population were (impossibly) greater, the exercise could make sense.

    However, we need only extrapolate from the projected point at which the virus can no longer find new hosts, that is, a population saturation of somewhere at or under 70% of the entire population.

    Without the "Hope multiplier" of an "estimated undercount" of infections, that is, going only by what we know, in the U.S., 4.7 million people have or had the virus.

    The population of the U.S. is 331 million.
    United States Population (2020) - Worldometer

    So let's use a simple model, then think about other knowns, and finally, apply hopes.

    The simple model is, you have to infect 70.4 times as many people to "skate to where the puck will be" by the time all is said and done.

    In the U.S., this would yields 331 million infections and 11 million deaths. I do not think this is our ultimate number, but we're only going by the knowns.

    1) We do not know whether there's any such thing as lasting immunity. If we saturate the country with COVID cases, the moment one can "get COVID 19 again," one does. However, assuming that this does not completely gainsay the concept of herd immunity, you could multiply by a factor of .7 (or even lesss). .7 x that 11 million figure gets you to 7.7 million dead in the U.S. -- going by the known info. only.

    2) We also do not know the extent of the hoped for undercount of COVID cases. In that we've refused to measure this when we had the chance (i.e., when lower numbers made it possible) hiding behind this unknown to write a pretty story about how it's "not so bad" is a bit of a chutzpah.

    3) Notwithstanding (2), I too choose hope. But I did want to put the knowns out there too, however, just in case folks are unclear on what we hope versus what we know. I for one have gotten a little bit irritated by the manipulation and attempted manipulation of the credulous as regards the "bright side" of this virus.

    4) Now let's look at the unknowns. It is unknown how many people truly do get the disease versus those who die of it, and it is unknowner still how many people get permanent damage without dying. It's also much more likely that the number of deaths by COVID is an undercount than an overcount -- but the business end of these unknowns is how many actually become COVID positive, versus how many test positive.

    4a) In 4, for those who need it spelled out, a high undercount is good for feeling safe, and a low undercount is more alarming. Most alarming of all (see above) is an assumption that at our present level of testing we know every case of COVID.

    Certain worthies hereabouts love to quote guesses based on these variables and scream about how alarmist the numbers are that they yield. So for them, I'll just blurt out what I think, and have thought since the beginning:

    The ultimate death toll in the U.S. probably will be confined to the hundreds of thousands, perhaps exceeding a million, and very very doubtfully reaching into the low millions (plural) if we really work on being as monumentally stupid as possible. So far we've done yeoman's work in this regard, but the ability of human beings to respond to personally experienced tragedy is perhaps -- perhaps -- a limiter on the influence of the death cult that has such political and media puissance at present through our present minority rule government.

    Does anybody think it's funny to say that we'll exceed 200,000 deaths by the end of this? A few weeks ago I quoted someone in my sig as saying words to the effect of "Hundreds of thousands. LOL."

    Again: If you get a ticket for a seat on an airline flight, sit down in the waiting area, and talk to a few unticketed strangers, they do not suddenly find valid tickets for airline flights in their pockets.

    If that happened, you could compare fatalities based on a range-bound denominator (Airline trips per annum) against one based on an exponentially growing denominator.

    The airline case is subject to "large" rate fluctuations -- see the case of 2018, in which two 737 Max aircraft were lost. But nowhere near as large as a factor of 18 million (or 180,000%, if you prefer).

    All of this is to teach those who can read and who have command of at least the four basic operations the difference between throwing the ball through a tire and leading a receiver who is moving at the speed of sound (to mix a metaphor.)

    Simpler metaphor: Skate to where the puck is going to be.

    Right now, about half of known cases are unresolved in the U.S.

    We are presently looking at known cases numbering 1/70th of potential cases. That represents between 1/70th of the the cases we will have and all the cases we will have. Both these extremes are exaggerations. The outcome will be somewhere in the middle.
     
    • Agree x 1
    • Dislike x 1
    • Winner x 1
    • Love x 1
    • Useful x 1
  19. Ring 6

    Ring 6 PatsFans.com Wall of Fame Member

    Joined:
    Sep 13, 2004
    Messages:
    50,322
    Likes Received:
    5,464
    Ratings:
    +8,078
    Lingering and permanent are different things.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  20. Bill Lee

    Bill Lee What, me worry? PatsFans.com Supporter

    Joined:
    Mar 12, 2012
    Messages:
    3,343
    Likes Received:
    1,340
    Ratings:
    +6,961
    But... But... But... that would be cowering!

    Freedom means I'm free to lick that third rail to see if there really is high voltage on it.

    Will the voltage kill me or the current, I can't truly be free till I know!
     
    • Funny Funny x 4

Share This Page

FORUM SEARCH: CLOSE
For searches w/multiple
players add commas
(Ex: "Bill Belichick, Devin McCourty")