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DaBruinz

Pats, B's, Sox
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I thought it interesting that it was reported that the pats were working with Parker on soft tissue injury avoidance. Dare I say the term 'pliability' was used.

Botton line: no one will disagree that when healthy Parker has excellent production. Maybe the pats will unlock the way to keep him on the field.
I have to wonder just how many teams have a hill that it FORCES the players to run at Camp. I know that Tomlinson used to run a hill behind his house to help stretch his leg muscles and prevent pulls.
 

BTTA

He/Him
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Lots of inference in this reply....but my guess is that when you have a history of soft tissue injuries like Hamstrings, calf pulls, etc a player and their team SHOULD look closely at their preparation, like how they stretch, warm up, etc. So it was reported that Parker has changed how he is preparing for this season. It was mentioned that there was more running involved, more stretching and "pliability" work as well. Will it help, we can only hope so. It makes sense and Parker seems like he has bought in.

One problem with this is that the emerging research on stretching is that it does harm more often than not, actually tearing and stretching muscle fibers that need to be left alone to heal.

Its amazing to me that no one actually reviewed stretching with serious research for decades, everyone just assuming a dogma that it is a good idea. Just like that, its far from a certainty.

So the guys giving the players their instructions and protocols may have been passing along bad info.
 

Ochmed Jones

Pro Bowl Player
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I have to wonder just how many teams have a hill that it FORCES the players to run at Camp. I know that Tomlinson used to run a hill behind his house to help stretch his leg muscles and prevent pulls.

I think Walter Payton used to run up a hill at the bears old facility.
 

LFGMac10

In the Starting Line-Up
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He's not a better overall player than Agholor though I'll give Agholor a pass for last year. I think he plays up to his contract this year and be really consistent. Meyers nice story and all but he doesn't scare anybody with his play. That said he could be dangerous if those guys in front of him plays really well.
Meyers somehow had 730 yards with Newton throwing him the football and pretty much 0 other receivers. He also got 866 yards with a rookie QB in one of the hardest offenses to learn.
His biggest bag is that he's not a red zone threat or 3rd down machine. But if you need a guy to make some catches that help move the chains. He's a good option
 

Ring 6

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Meyers somehow had 730 yards with Newton throwing him the football and pretty much 0 other receivers. He also got 866 yards with a rookie QB in one of the hardest offenses to learn.
His biggest bag is that he's not a red zone threat or 3rd down machine. But if you need a guy to make some catches that help move the chains. He's a good option
He was 10th in the NFL last year in 1st down catches on 3rd down.
 

DaBruinz

Pats, B's, Sox
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Meyers somehow had 730 yards with Newton throwing him the football and pretty much 0 other receivers. He also got 866 yards with a rookie QB in one of the hardest offenses to learn.
His biggest bag is that he's not a red zone threat or 3rd down machine. But if you need a guy to make some catches that help move the chains. He's a good option
I can easily see Meyers being the odd man out. Parker and Bourne on 1st/2n downs. Agholor coming in as the 3rd WR, bumping Bourne inside, Thornton and Meyers battling it out for the 4th/5th slot.

I wouldn't be surprised if Meyers or Agholor get shipped to Dallas.
 

One-If-By-Sea

In the Starting Line-Up
One problem with this is that the emerging research on stretching is that it does harm more often than not, actually tearing and stretching muscle fibers that need to be left alone to heal.

Its amazing to me that no one actually reviewed stretching with serious research for decades, everyone just assuming a dogma that it is a good idea. Just like that, its far from a certainty.

So the guys giving the players their instructions and protocols may have been passing along bad info.

Is there a link to the emerging research? I swear by hot yoga. The next morning the difference is still noticeable.
 

Sicilian

Pro Bowl Player
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Meyers somehow had 730 yards with Newton throwing him the football and pretty much 0 other receivers. He also got 866 yards with a rookie QB in one of the hardest offenses to learn.
His biggest bag is that he's not a red zone threat or 3rd down machine. But if you need a guy to make some catches that help move the chains. He's a good option

See, I feel like he's the exact kind of guy you want on 3rd down, at least on like 3rd and 5-7. He's the guy that will find the soft part of a zone, be where he's supposed to be, and reliably catch the ball. If it's 3rd and long, it gets tougher because he's not the guy who beats you deep, but when all you need is 6 yards to keep your drive alive? He's great at that.

I can absolutely see them having 3rd and long packages with Agholor, Thornton, and Bourne, then 3rd and middle packages with Meyers, Bourne, and Parker.
 

BTTA

He/Him
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Is there a link to the emerging research? I swear by hot yoga. The next morning the difference is still noticeable.
I don't off hand. I read it a few months ago in a news article reporting on peer reviewed journal article.
But by all means, keep up the hot yoga!
 

JarOfMayo51

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One problem with this is that the emerging research on stretching is that it does harm more often than not, actually tearing and stretching muscle fibers that need to be left alone to heal.

Its amazing to me that no one actually reviewed stretching with serious research for decades, everyone just assuming a dogma that it is a good idea. Just like that, its far from a certainty.

So the guys giving the players their instructions and protocols may have been passing along bad info.

A lion doesn't stretch before it runs down a gazelle
 

LFGMac10

In the Starting Line-Up
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I don't off hand. I read it a few months ago in a news article reporting on peer reviewed journal article.
But by all means, keep up the hot yoga!
How was the study done? Retrospective, observational, controlled randomized? What was the confidence interval of the study? Also, if there's one thing we learned in this pandemic, it's that news agencies more often than not, fail to properly convey the central findings of studies.
 

Ring 6

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I retract my 3rd down statement
Well 10th was with 19 so it’s more that very few receivers get a ton of 3rd down conversions, first was 31, less than 2 a game.
Welker with the Pats had 22, 18, 18, 13, 24, 21 so an average of 19.3 per season or barely more than 1 a game and the common perception is that he was a 3rd down machine getting 5+ a game.
 

LFGMac10

In the Starting Line-Up
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Well 10th was with 19 so it’s more that very few receivers get a ton of 3rd down conversions, first was 31, less than 2 a game.
Welker with the Pats had 22, 18, 18, 13, 24, 21 so an average of 19.3 per season or barely more than 1 a game and the common perception is that he was a 3rd down machine getting 5+ a game.
then I retract my retraction. I didn't think he was getting 3rd down conversions at the clip an Edelman or Welker would.
 

Ring 6

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then I retract my retraction. I didn't think he was getting 3rd down conversions at the clip an Edelman or Welker would.
Edelmans best were 24,18,15
So Meyers had more 3rd down conversions catches last year than any year for Edelman but 1 and more than 3 of welkers 6 years, and 0.33 shy of welkers average.
So he was a very effective 3rd down receiver, but very effective in reality vs perception seems to be quite a bit different.
 

jimnance

In the Starting Line-Up
One problem with this is that the emerging research on stretching is that it does harm more often than not, actually tearing and stretching muscle fibers that need to be left alone to heal.

Its amazing to me that no one actually reviewed stretching with serious research for decades, everyone just assuming a dogma that it is a good idea. Just like that, its far from a certainty.

So the guys giving the players their instructions and protocols may have been passing along bad info.
This is wrong.
Proper stretching is as important as strength/resistance training or any other training. It's all necessary to be the best athlete you can be and protect against injury.
But I like anything else how, when and what type of stretching you do is crucial.
NEVER stretch muscles that aren't properly warmed up first. Stretching is NOT a warmup exercise. You should have a light sweat going before you stretch. Usually light cardio or calisthenics do the trick.
Tight muscles that haven't been stretched cause more injuries than anything else.
Yoga is the best form of stretching and pretty much every pro athlete does it.
A tight muscle is more susceptible to injury.
I boxed and played competitive hoops.
I know what I'm talking about.
Another thing to bear in mind is stretching temporarily weakens a muscle- but only for about 15-20 minutes. After that 15-20 minute period passes,the stretching actually helps you to utilize more of your muscle power You need range of motion to maximize muscle power.
Ever try to shoot 3's immediately after lifting? At first you'll be throwing up bricks.
 

BTTA

He/Him
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How was the study done? Retrospective, observational, controlled randomized? What was the confidence interval of the study? Also, if there's one thing we learned in this pandemic, it's that news agencies more often than not, fail to properly convey the central findings of studies.

I'm deeply embedded in both original research and journalist-interpreted science.
There's a lot of new science out there about stretching. In the case of that one article, it didn't rise the to level of importance for me to track anything like the detail you are talking about. I do remember seeing it as a credible source for good science and noting that it was a paradigm shaker, as is anything that messes with buried assumptions and long standing tradition.
 

BTTA

He/Him
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This is wrong.
Proper stretching is as important as strength/resistance training or any other training. It's all necessary to be the best athlete you can be and protect against injury.
But I like anything else how, when and what type of stretching you do is crucial.
NEVER stretch muscles that aren't properly warmed up first. Stretching is NOT a warmup exercise. You should have a light sweat going before you stretch. Usually light cardio or calisthenics do the trick.
Tight muscles that haven't been stretched cause more injuries than anything else.
Yoga is the best form of stretching and pretty much every pro athlete does it.
A tight muscle is more susceptible to injury.
I boxed and played competitive hoops.
I know what I'm talking about.
Another thing to bear in mind is stretching temporarily weakens a muscle- but only for about 15-20 minutes. After that 15-20 minute period passes,the stretching actually helps you to utilize more of your muscle power You need range of motion to maximize muscle power.
Ever try to shoot 3's immediately after lifting? At first you'll be throwing up bricks.

What you are saying is and has been the dogma of physical fitness for decades. The research I saw questioned that. So it means that it is very interesting and worth keeping an eye on. Nothing really important about this, because it is only sports and fitness.

Most of our trouble as a species comes from saying "this is wrong" when someone offers a different viewpoint than what is generally accepted. It is entertaining and energizing when that happens, because it opens up opportunities that we didn't have before that.
 

n6249c

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I'm deeply embedded in both original research and journalist-interpreted science.
There's a lot of new science out there about stretching. In the case of that one article, it didn't rise the to level of importance for me to track anything like the detail you are talking about. I do remember seeing it as a credible source for good science and noting that it was a paradigm shaker, as is anything that messes with buried assumptions and long standing tradition.
What you are saying is and has been the dogma of physical fitness for decades. The research I saw questioned that. So it means that it is very interesting and worth keeping an eye on. Nothing really important about this, because it is only sports and fitness.

Most of our trouble as a species comes from saying "this is wrong" when someone offers a different viewpoint than what is generally accepted. It is entertaining and energizing when that happens, because it opens up opportunities that we didn't have before that.
expanding our knowledge and understanding is a messy process. These days there seems to be a very high premium placed on being disruptive to established paradigms. Trouble is that often comes at the expense of nuance.

for example, conventional wisdom says stretching is good. Research questioning that and upsetting that paradigm then is seen as saying that’s wrong so stretching is bad. But as jimnance pointed out, there are details and technique matters, so it will likely turn out that some stretching, done right, is good, and some stretching, done wrong, is bad.

but nuance doesn’t trigger the dopamine that revolutionary thinking does. So we struggle to make sense of a polychromatic world we insist viewing in only black and white. No shades of grey allowed.

personally, when I work out and don’t stretch, bad things happen that don’t happen when I do stretch. No peer review, very unscientific anecdotal research, but empirical results are good enough for me.
 

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