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Mike Lombardi- 30 questions Belichick asks about a Quarterback

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Patsfan1958

Third String But Playing on Special Teams
From the article:
Speaking on his The GM Shuffle podcast, Lombardi pulled out the scouting points Belichick and company used to emphasize during their time together with the Cleveland Browns in the 1990s.

“We tried to define exactly what we were looking for at the position. So, quarterback, and I’m going to read this to you: ‘Quarterback, we wanted somebody who was at least 6027, weighed 220, could run 4.81, had a test score of 25 and we understood that his decline would start at 31 and probably his career would end at 35.’ Now, those numbers are obsolete. This was written back in 1991. So, we know that age is different,” Lombardi said.

He acknowledged that some of the benchmarks would be obsolete by now given that they were formulated in the early 90s. Despite that, however, the general framework of evaluation could still be relevant some three decades later: Belichick’s baseline principles have hardly changed, as a series of scouting questions Lombardi presented also illustrates.

In total, 30 of those were mentioned on the podcast:


The 30 questions Bill Belichick is asking about a quarterback, according to an ex-Patriots executive
 

Ross12

Moderator
Staff member
PatsFans.com Supporter
A lot of good questions here. Interesting that most of the questions are about mental makeup and leadership before you get to anything about athletic ability.
 

Bill Lee

What, me worry?
PatsFans.com Supporter
A lot of good questions here. Interesting that most of the questions are about mental makeup and leadership before you get to anything about athletic ability.
I found the following part to be interesting:

Take Alabama’s Mac Jones and North Dakota State’s Trey Lance as an example. Both are considered realistic targets for the Patriots, but there are uncertainties surrounding both when looking at the questions above: How much of Jones’ production was due to scheme and supporting cast, for example? How much of Lance’s was due to opposition? Both those questions will be asked by the Patriots’ evaluators, and the answers will help paint a clearer picture.

The whole article would have been a lot more interesting if they found someone who knew the top five QB prospects well and formed profiles on them based on the 30 questions. For instance from what I've read I think Mac Jones would get a lot of demerits based on size, ability to see the field, and foot speed.
 

DaBruinz

Pats, B's, Sox
PatsFans.com Supporter
I found the following part to be interesting:

Take Alabama’s Mac Jones and North Dakota State’s Trey Lance as an example. Both are considered realistic targets for the Patriots, but there are uncertainties surrounding both when looking at the questions above: How much of Jones’ production was due to scheme and supporting cast, for example? How much of Lance’s was due to opposition? Both those questions will be asked by the Patriots’ evaluators, and the answers will help paint a clearer picture.

The whole article would have been a lot more interesting if they found someone who knew the top five QB prospects well and formed profiles on them based on the 30 questions. For instance from what I've read I think Mac Jones would get a lot of demerits based on size, ability to see the field, and foot speed.
Mac Jones measured in at 6'2 5/8 and 217 lbs. It's highly unlikely that he'd get "a lot of demerits" based on that. When you say "foot speed", are you referring to 40 time or are you referring to his agility scores? As for ability to see the field, that's not one of the knocks I've heard about on Jones..
 

Ross12

Moderator
Staff member
PatsFans.com Supporter
Mac Jones measured in at 6'2 5/8 and 217 lbs. It's highly unlikely that he'd get "a lot of demerits" based on that. When you say "foot speed", are you referring to 40 time or are you referring to his agility scores? As for ability to see the field, that's not one of the knocks I've heard about on Jones..
Mac ran a 4.79 forty, so he just barely squeaks into the "4.81" metric, hah.

Edit: Looks like he also ran a 4.72 and 4.68, so not too bad for his type of QB.
 

zipster9

In the Starting Line-Up
There is going to be all sorts of "miss-direction" and "false stats or personalities" as we get into the final week before the draft.

We will see on draft day if BillB sticks with his history of draft selection process, or deviate from that this "one" draft time.....
 

jimnance

In the Starting Line-Up
Bill is a happy man today.
President Biden became the 1st U.S.President to declare the mass murderings of Turkish Armenians dyrung WW1 as genocide.
This is something Bill has advocated for for years and long overdue.
I really dont give a **** if anyone here objects to this as political. It's not.
Its about doing the right thing.
 

jmt57

Moderator
Staff member
“‘We will never take a quarterback with a low test score who plays at a poor level of competition and is not capable of leading the team. Those three areas are vital to us when we’re looking for a quarterback.
The level of comp is a tough call, but it really applies to the quarterback position. It would be difficult for a small-school quarterback to get a good grade unless he played well in the postseason.’”

Interesting that despite the level of competition, Belichick has twice drafted a quarterback from a second tier school relatively early:
- 2014: Jimmy G (2nd round, #62; Eastern Illinois)
- 2008: Kevin O'Connell (3rd round, #94; San Diego State)

Garoppolo was named the best player in the FCS, and played well in his two 2013 playoff games (Eastern Illinois scored 51 points and 39 points, so he still fits the standards.

But the Pats seemed to contradict their own philosophy when it came to KOC. In his four years there SDSU went 4-7, 5-7, 3-9 and 4-8; as a senior the Aztecs scored 17 or fewer points four times. However he apparently played well in the Hula Bowl, and also played in the East-West Shrine game, so maybe that was enough? To this day that draft pick still baffles me.
 

jmt57

Moderator
Staff member
Smarts and accuracy got to be on top, having the strongest arm don’t mean jack if you can’t process a defense.
So true. JaMarcus Russell, Jeff George; plenty of other examples.


edit: this list of the strongest arms in college football from 2016 is pretty amusing to look at now, as further proof that arm strength is nice, but highly overrated.

 

Vindicate

Rotational Player and Threatening Starter's Job
Bill is a happy man today.
President Biden became the 1st U.S.President to declare the mass murderings of Turkish Armenians dyrung WW1 as genocide.
This is something Bill has advocated for for years and long overdue.
I really dont give a **** if anyone here objects to this as political. It's not.
Its about doing the right thing.

While what you're speaking of is a great thing,

Uhhhh. What does it have to do with the topic lol?

And I wonder how much this criteria has changed with the rule/game changes since the 90s.
 

fnordcircle

The poster who James White said inspires him.
PatsFans.com Supporter
In total, 30 of those were mentioned on the podcast:

  • Does he watch tape?
  • Does he watch it alone with the coach?
  • Does he watch it with the gameplay?
  • How much time does he spend, and how long does he need to get the gameplay?
  • Is he thick-skinned, can he handle the pressure of the position positive and negative?
  • How many times does he come back and lead his team to a win?
  • How often does he play with the lead?
  • How often does he play from behind?
  • When do turnovers occur?
  • Can he secure the ball?
  • What are his cold-weather ball habits?
  • What is his eye level like during the game?
  • Can he see down the field?
  • Is he quick-minded?
  • Does he change plays at the line of scrimmage or is everything coming off the cardboard box?
  • What was his production in college, and who was his production against?
  • Can he throw touchdown passes, and where on the field do they go?
  • What are the main coverages he faces each week?
  • Critical play of the game, who has the ball in his hands?
  • What is his third-down quarterback rating?
  • Can he make plays on all downs?
  • What was his high school won-loss record?
  • Was he the best athlete in high school?
  • Does he have incredible eye-hand coordination?
  • Could he go play golf or some other sports?
  • Can he come back and be effective after a big hit?
  • What’s his body language like after being hit?
  • How often is he in the facility? How many days a week?
  • Is he a gym rat?
  • What kind of ball — old, new, used, same — does he throw in practice and the game?
 

jimnance

In the Starting Line-Up
In total, 30 of those were mentioned on the podcast:

  • Does he watch tape?
  • Does he watch it alone with the coach?
  • Does he watch it with the gameplay?
  • How much time does he spend, and how long does he need to get the gameplay?
  • Is he thick-skinned, can he handle the pressure of the position positive and negative?
  • How many times does he come back and lead his team to a win?
  • How often does he play with the lead?
  • How often does he play from behind?
  • When do turnovers occur?
  • Can he secure the ball?
  • What are his cold-weather ball habits?
  • What is his eye level like during the game?
  • Can he see down the field?
  • Is he quick-minded?
  • Does he change plays at the line of scrimmage or is everything coming off the cardboard box?
  • What was his production in college, and who was his production against?
  • Can he throw touchdown passes, and where on the field do they go?
  • What are the main coverages he faces each week?
  • Critical play of the game, who has the ball in his hands?
  • What is his third-down quarterback rating?
  • Can he make plays on all downs?
  • What was his high school won-loss record?
  • Was he the best athlete in high school?
  • Does he have incredible eye-hand coordination?
  • Could he go play golf or some other sports?
  • Can he come back and be effective after a big hit?
  • What’s his body language like after being hit?
  • How often is he in the facility? How many days a week?
  • Is he a gym rat?
  • What kind of ball — old, new, used, same — does he throw in practice and the game?
Theres one qb BB evaluated who answered all 30 questions.
Unfortunately, hes playing in Tampa.
 

DropKickFlutie

Veteran Starter w/Big Long Term Deal
“‘We will never take a quarterback with a low test score who plays at a poor level of competition and is not capable of leading the team. Those three areas are vital to us when we’re looking for a quarterback.
The level of comp is a tough call, but it really applies to the quarterback position. It would be difficult for a small-school quarterback to get a good grade unless he played well in the postseason.’”

Interesting that despite the level of competition, Belichick has twice drafted a quarterback from a second tier school relatively early:
- 2014: Jimmy G (2nd round, #62; Eastern Illinois)
- 2008: Kevin O'Connell (3rd round, #94; San Diego State)

Garoppolo was named the best player in the FCS, and played well in his two 2013 playoff games (Eastern Illinois scored 51 points and 39 points, so he still fits the standards.

But the Pats seemed to contradict their own philosophy when it came to KOC. In his four years there SDSU went 4-7, 5-7, 3-9 and 4-8; as a senior the Aztecs scored 17 or fewer points four times. However he apparently played well in the Hula Bowl, and also played in the East-West Shrine game, so maybe that was enough? To this day that draft pick still baffles me.

O'Connell, Mallett, Tebow, our OC is a QB whisperer....

.
 

DropKickFlutie

Veteran Starter w/Big Long Term Deal
From the article:
Speaking on his The GM Shuffle podcast, Lombardi pulled out the scouting points Belichick and company used to emphasize during their time together with the Cleveland Browns in the 1990s.

“We tried to define exactly what we were looking for at the position. So, quarterback, and I’m going to read this to you: ‘Quarterback, we wanted somebody who was at least 6027, weighed 220, could run 4.81, had a test score of 25 and we understood that his decline would start at 31 and probably his career would end at 35.’ Now, those numbers are obsolete. This was written back in 1991. So, we know that age is different,” Lombardi said.

He acknowledged that some of the benchmarks would be obsolete by now given that they were formulated in the early 90s. Despite that, however, the general framework of evaluation could still be relevant some three decades later: Belichick’s baseline principles have hardly changed, as a series of scouting questions Lombardi presented also illustrates.

In total, 30 of those were mentioned on the podcast:


The 30 questions Bill Belichick is asking about a quarterback, according to an ex-Patriots executive

These 30 questions are excellent. If a scout digs deep into the tape this will show a lot about how a QB performs in specific key situations.
 

captain stone

Hall of Fame Poster
Interesting that despite the level of competition, Belichick has twice drafted a quarterback from a second tier school relatively early:
- 2014: Jimmy G (2nd round, #62; Eastern Illinois)
- 2008: Kevin O'Connell (3rd round, #94; San Diego State)

Garoppolo was named the best player in the FCS, and played well in his two 2013 playoff games (Eastern Illinois scored 51 points and 39 points, so he still fits the standards.

But the Pats seemed to contradict their own philosophy when it came to KOC. In his four years there SDSU went 4-7, 5-7, 3-9 and 4-8; as a senior the Aztecs scored 17 or fewer points four times. However he apparently played well in the Hula Bowl, and also played in the East-West Shrine game, so maybe that was enough? To this day that draft pick still baffles me.

Yeah that 2008 draft sucked overall...Mayo was a good player his first 5 years here, but he really wasn't what one would consider the 10th overall pick of the entire draft good...I can still see Russell Wilson bouncing off him in Seattle as if he wasn't even there...And sorry not sorry, but Matt Slater would've not only still been available at the Pats original 5th-rounder, but he probably would've also still been available at the 7th-rounder (#238) Bill gave to Tampa for him in the first place...
 
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