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July 6 in Pats History: Happy 65th Birthday to Matt Bahr

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jmt57

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There is a wide variety of of New England Patriots characters that share July 6 as their birthday, making the choice for top billing not an easy one. In the end I simply chose the player with the most games played with the Pats.


Today in Patriots History
Matt Bahr


When a fan thinks about Patriot kickers, the names Gostkowski, Vinatieri and Cappelletti all quickly come to mind. This three-time Super Bowl champion held things together for New England teams in their kicking game during final three of his 17 seasons in the NFL, a period of time when the Pats improved from 2-14 to 6-10 to 10-6.


Happy 65th birthday to Matt Bahr
Born July 6, 1956 in Philadelphia
Patriot K, 1993-1995; uniform #3
Claimed off waivers from Philadelphia on Dec 13, 1993


  • 25 regular season games with Pats, plus one playoff game.
  • 55/72 on field goal attempts; 73/73 on extra points; one punt for 29 yards.
  • At the age of 39 his 55-yard field goal on November 12, 1995 against Miami set a franchise record (later broken by Adam Vinatieri in 2002).
  • At the age of 37 Matt Bahr reunited with Bill Parcells, to replace the erratic Scott 'Missing' Sisson at kicker late in 1993; Bahr would give way to Vinatieri after the 1996 preseason.
  • Ranks sixth in franchise history with 55 successful field goals and 73 PATs (was fourth in both categories when he retired in 1996).
  • Tied with Jim Colclough as 10th all-time in club history at the time he retired, with 238 points scored (now ranks 16th, last surpassed by Julian Edelman).
  • Kicked 300 field goals and scored 1,422 points over 17 NFL seasons.
  • Scored 103 points in 14 playoff games.
  • Set an NFCCG record with five field goals on 1/20/91, in New York's 15-13 won over San Francisco.
  • Three-time Super Bowl champion (Steelers, '79; 49ers, '81; Giants, '90) kicked the winning field goal in the Scott Norwood 'wide right' game; Bahr also played professional soccer for three years.
  • Later worked as an electrical engineer, and also as a player advisor with the Harvard Football Players Health Study.
















Today in Pro Football History: Matt Bahr, 1984

One of two brothers to become placekickers in the NFL (his older sibling Chris kicked for the Bengals, Raiders, and Chargers), Bahr received All-America honors in college after connecting on 81.5 percent of his field goals and was chosen by the Steelers in the sixth round of the 1979 NFL draft. He also played soccer, in college and professionally with the Colorado Caribous and Tulsa Roughnecks of the North American Soccer League, before joining the Steelers. Bahr kicked 18 field goals and a league-leading 50 extra points for Pittsburgh in 1979, a season capped with a Super Bowl victory, and played a second year before being beaten out by David Trout in the ’81 preseason and moving on to the San Francisco 49ers. He was traded to Cleveland four games into the season and, while there were concerns about the length of his kickoffs, Bahr connected on a solid 13 of 20 field goal tries. Following a lesser year in 1982, he rebounded in ’83 to lead the NFL with an 87.5 field goal percentage (21 of 24).​

Bahr spent another five seasons with the Browns, although injuries were a factor when he tore knee ligaments while making a tackle in 1986 that cost him the remaining four games that year, the postseason, and most of ’87. After kicking 143 field goals and 248 extra points, resulting in 677 points for the Browns, Bahr moved on to the New York Giants in 1990 and, in addition to 17 field goals in 13 regular season contests, booted five field goals against the 49ers in winning the NFC Championship game 15-13. He also was successful on both of his three-point attempts in the one-point Super Bowl win over Buffalo. After two more years with New York, Bahr started the 1993 season with Philadelphia, who waived him in December, and finished up with New England, where he kicked a career-high 27 field goals in ’94. He played one more season for the Patriots (and was cut in the 1996 preseason in favor of rookie Adam Vinatieri) and concluded his 17-year career with 300 field goals out of 415 attempts (72.3 %), 522 extra points, and 1422 points, which ranked ninth in NFL history at the time.​

 

jmt57

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Staff member
Today in Patriots History
Adrian Clayborn


Happy 33rd birthday to Adrian Clayborn
Born July 6, 1988 in St. Louis
Patriot DE, 2018; uniform #94
Signed as a free agent on March 16, 2018

Adrian Clayborn was the 20th player selected in the 2011 draft, by Tampa Bay out of Iowa. He missed 13 games in 2012 due to torn ligaments in his knee, and 15 games in 2014 with a biceps injury. The Bucs had already declined to exercise the option of a fifth year on his contract, and he signed a one-year deal with Atlanta in 2015. The Falcons re-signed Clayborn to a two-year contract, and he was playing well (9.5 sacks) in 2017 when he once again went on IR with a torn biceps two weeks before Super Bowl 51.




The Patriots must have been impressed with Adrian while studying Atlanta for that game because they offered him a two-year contract with $5.5 million guaranteed one year after the 28-3 comeback. To say that Clayborn underwhelmed would be putting it mildly, as he finished the season with 11 tackles and 2.5 sacks. In the three postseason games he had one tackle (a sack) and did get a ring for the Super Bowl victory over the Rams. The Patriots released Clayborn on March 15, 2019, eating a $2 million dead money cap charge (but also freeing up $4 mil in the process). Clayborn re-signed with Atlanta, and played for the Browns in 2020; he is now once again a free agent.













 

jmt57

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Staff member
Today in Patriots History
Erroll Tucker


Happy 57th birthday to Erroll Tucker
Born July 6, 1964 in Pittsburgh
Patriot KR/PR/CB, 1989-1990; uniform #21
Signed as a free agent on Nov 7, 1989



  • Five games played with the Patriots.
  • Averaged 20.8 yards on 13 kick returns; averaged 7.8 yards on 13 punt returns.
  • 122nd overall selection of the 1986 draft by the Steelers, out of Utah.
  • Career derailed by multiple surgeries after suffering a broken fibula in a preseason game his rookie year.
  • Played in 18 NFL games over four seasons.
  • Also played for Orlando in the WLAF in 1991, and spent two seasons in the CFL. Won a Grey Cup with Doug Flutie for the Calgary Stampeders in 1992.



Here is a good biography from 2009 on Erroll Tucker:

Today, Erroll works as a Physical Therapy Aide for Los Alamitos Orthopaedic & Sports Physical Therapy. What’s his advice for other people recovering for injuries? (Okay, it’s too perfect to edit a single word.) “Don’t try to rush it. Don’t question it. Sometimes things happen for a reason and it’s out of our control. But the main focus is to do your rehab, be patient, let your body heal and let nature take its course,” he explained enthusiastically, “You get out of it, what you put into it. You have to work hard to get back on your feet. Whether it’s to get back to work, professional sports, or everyday life. You have to do your rehab right. Don’t rush it. Take your time. Do the things you need to do.”​

Erroll seems to have a knack for doing things right. He’s giving back in other ways, too. He returned to his hometown, the City of Lynwood to coach youth sports, including football and track, in his spare time. When he realized the kids had been without any Pop Warner or youth football for eight years, he stepped up with his business partner, Eugene Jackson who works with Nike, to put on several football camps each year.​



As good as he was on defense, he might have been even better on special teams where he was a two-time first-team All-WAC performer and an All-American.​

His best season as a returner came in 1985 when he was first-team all-conference and was a first-team All-American by three publications after leading the nation in punt return average (24.3) and kick return average (29.1). That year, he finished with 24 kick returns for 698 yards and two touchdowns to go long with 16 punt returns for 389 yards and two more scores.​

For his Utah career, he totaled 118 tackles, 14 pass break-ups, eight interceptions and six tackles for loss. He also averaged 26.6 yards with two touchdowns on 41 kick returns as well as 17 yards and three scores on 38 punt returns.​


 

jmt57

Moderator
Staff member
Today in Patriots History
King Corcoran


Happy birthday to King Corcoran, who would have been 78 today
Born July 6, 1943 in Jersey City, NJ
Patriot QB, 1968; uniform #15
Signed from the taxi squad on November 18, 1968
Died June 19, 2009 at the age of 65
  • Two games with Pats, with zero starts.
  • Game One: 3/3 for 33 yards in Week 12 vs Miami.
  • Game Two: 0/4 with two interceptions in Week 15 at Houston

The flamboyant self promoter known as 'the poor man's Joe Namath' spent five years in the Atlantic Coast Football League, one in the CFL and two in the Seaboard Football League. James Sean Patrick 'King' Corcoran also led the World Football League in touchdown passes in 1974.

In 1969 NFL Films produced a documentary on minor league football titled "Pro Football, Pottstown PA". While the focus was on the ACFL team, Corcoran - who drove a Lincoln that was equipped with a bar, copier and car phone (two decades before mobile phones began to become mainstream) - was the star of the film.



QB King Corcoran had a so-so career at the University of Maryland, and a better one in the minors.
Off the field, he was quite a bit more successful with the ladies.


Jim Corcoran Dies; 'Poor Man's Joe Namath' Reigned in Minor League Football



A jersey, a game, a 1965 Maryland season, and "The King"

King Corcoran and Me: There are only two people I’ve ever wanted to kill – and King Corcoran is one


 

jmt57

Moderator
Staff member
Today in Patriots History
Fred Dryer


Happy 75th birthday to Fred Dryer
Born July 6, 1946 in Hawthorne, CA
Patriot DE, 1972 off season
Acquired in trade with New York Giants on January 31, 1972

Fred Dryer was a first round pick by the Giants in 1969, from San Diego State. After three good seasons he was traded to the Pats in exchange for 1st, 2nd and 6th round draft picks. The problem was that Dryer refused to report to Foxborough. He had wanted more money, wanted to play for a winning team, and preferably wanted to play in his native southern California - close to Hollywood for his next career. The Pats were forced to trade him, getting a first round pick and backup DE Rick Cash in return. Dryer went on to have a 13-year NFL career, playing in 176 games.

While playing in Los Angeles, Dryer began picking up small roles in television series and made for TV movies. In 1984 Dryer was cast as the lead role in the detective show Hunter; the series would air 152 episodes over seven years.




College Football Hall of Fame - Fred Dryer (1997)

In 1967 San Diego State went 10-1 and beat San Francisco State in the Camellia Bowl. In 1968 the record was 9-0-1. The head coach was Don Coryell, and Dryer was recruited by the defensive coordinator, John Madden. San Diego State was in Division I-AA at that time; in 1978 the Aztecs moved up to I-A. Dryer played 13 years as a pro with the New York Giants and Los Angeles Rams. He became a star actor, the main character in the NBC television drama "Hunter." Dryer was Rick Hunter, a homicide detective.​


Fred Dryer holds the NFL record for most safeties in a game — and, oh yeah, he was almost Sam Malone on ‘Cheers’

His first credited role was in 1980 — while he was still in the NFL — as a guest star in an episode of Laverne & Shirley.​

He retired from the NFL at the beginning of the 1981 season and took a job as a color commentator for CBS. But that just one season — he was ready for a career away from the football field.​

When pilot season rolled around, Dryer auditioned for a show that would eventually become one that everybody knows its name: Cheers.​

While Dryer lost out on that role, he did appear a few times on the show as sportscaster Dave Richards, a former teammate of Sam’s.​

And eventually, that helped lead to ...​

Before the 1984 TV season and with a couple more years experience as an actor, Dryer was still trying to nab a starring role. He auditioned for Miami Vice but the 6’6 Dryer was declared “too tall” to be James Crockett (famously played by Don Johnson, who is 5’11).​

However, that year Dryer was cast as the lead in Hunter, one of those ubiquitous “male-female partners, solving crime!” shows of the ‘80s like Moonlighting, Scarecrow and Mrs. King, Remington Steele, and Hart to Hart.​

Rick Hunter was an LAPD homicide detective who didn’t mind breaking a few rules to get a bad guy off the street. “Nobody could throw a guy off a building like me.”​

Each week, Hunter and his partner, Dee Dee McCall (Stepfanie Kramer), chased down the worst of the worst criminals, sometimes in a cherry red Dodge. The show ran for seven seasons and later returned for three made-for-TV movies.​




July 6, 1973:
The Patriots sign their first round draft pick, somebody by the name of John Hannah. They also trade defensive tackle Ron Berger to Buffalo for MLB Ken Lee. Berger had nine sacks in 1970, but missed most of the previous season with a torn ACL; he never played in the NFL again. Lee never played in the NFL again either; he and Tommy Reynolds were traded to Chicago in mid August for a 2nd and 4th round draft pick. The second round pick was used on guard Steve Corbett, who had to retire in 1976 due to injuries. The fourth was traded to Pittsburgh for safety Ralph Anderson, who only played one season before signing with the WFL; the Steelers turned around and used that draft pick to select Hall of Fame receiver John Stallworth.




Other pro football players with New England area connections born on July 6:

- Chandler Fenner, 31 (7/6/90); Holy Cross, class of 2012.
Was in training camp with KC in 2012, on Seattle's practice squad in 2013, and appeared in 11 games with the Giants in 2014; he then played in the CFL through the 2019 season.

- Dave Mishel (1905-1975); grew up in Lynn and went to Lynn Classical High School and Brown University.
Running back in the early days of the NFL for Providence and Cleveland.

- Alex Joseph, 33 (7/6/88); Stamford CT
Bounced between four teams over two NFL seasons. The LB then spent a couple years in the CFL and one in the Indoor Football League. He is now a trainer with Blue Streak Sports Training in Stamford CT.




Other pro football player born July 6 include:

- Joe Jacoby, 62 (7/6/59); the left tackle went to four Pro Bowls and won three super bowl rings while appearing in 170 regular season and 21 playoff games for Washington.

- Nnamdi Asomugha, 40 (7/6/81); from 2006-10 he was considered to be the best corner in the NFL: after recording eight interceptions and 19 passes defensed in 2006, opposing quarterbacks rarely threw towards the Raiders CB.

- Gary Ballman (1940-2004); flanker/kick returner went to the Pro Bowl in '64 and '65, and had 5,366 career receiving yards.

- Hugh 'Bones' Taylor (1923-1992); Pro Bowl end led the NFL in touchdown receptions in 1949, and in yards per reception in 1950 with 21.4 yards per catch.

- Alvin Harper, 53 (7/6/68); he led the NFL with 24.9 yards per catch with Dallas in 1994, but without Michael Irvin on the other side he was a free agent bust the next year in Tampa.

- Brandon Jacobs, 39 (7/6/82); 256 pound running back scored 64 touchdowns with the Giants from 2005 to 2013.
 

There is a wide variety of of New England Patriots characters that share July 6 as their birthday, making the choice for top billing not an easy one. In the end I simply chose the player with the most games played with the Pats.


Today in Patriots History
Matt Bahr


When a fan thinks about Patriot kickers, the names Gostkowski, Vinatieri and Cappelletti all quickly come to mind. This three-time Super Bowl champion held things together for New England teams in their kicking game during final three of his 17 seasons in the NFL, a period of time when the Pats improved from 2-14 to 6-10 to 10-6.


Happy 65th birthday to Matt Bahr
Born July 6, 1956 in Philadelphia
Patriot K, 1993-1995; uniform #3
Claimed off waivers from Philadelphia on Dec 13, 1993


  • 25 regular season games with Pats, plus one playoff game.
  • 55/72 on field goal attempts; 73/73 on extra points; one punt for 29 yards.
  • At the age of 39 his 55-yard field goal on November 12, 1995 against Miami set a franchise record (later broken by Adam Vinatieri in 2002).
  • At the age of 37 Matt Bahr reunited with Bill Parcells, to replace the erratic Scott 'Missing' Sisson at kicker late in 1993; Bahr would give way to Vinatieri after the 1996 preseason.
  • Ranks sixth in franchise history with 55 successful field goals and 73 PATs (was fourth in both categories when he retired in 1996).
  • Tied with Jim Colclough as 10th all-time in club history at the time he retired, with 238 points scored (now ranks 16th, last surpassed by Julian Edelman).
  • Kicked 300 field goals and scored 1,422 points over 17 NFL seasons.
  • Scored 103 points in 14 playoff games.
  • Set an NFCCG record with five field goals on 1/20/91, in New York's 15-13 won over San Francisco.
  • Three-time Super Bowl champion (Steelers, '79; 49ers, '81; Giants, '90) kicked the winning field goal in the Scott Norwood 'wide right' game; Bahr also played professional soccer for three years.
  • Later worked as an electrical engineer, and also as a player advisor with the Harvard Football Players Health Study.
















Today in Pro Football History: Matt Bahr, 1984

One of two brothers to become placekickers in the NFL (his older sibling Chris kicked for the Bengals, Raiders, and Chargers), Bahr received All-America honors in college after connecting on 81.5 percent of his field goals and was chosen by the Steelers in the sixth round of the 1979 NFL draft. He also played soccer, in college and professionally with the Colorado Caribous and Tulsa Roughnecks of the North American Soccer League, before joining the Steelers. Bahr kicked 18 field goals and a league-leading 50 extra points for Pittsburgh in 1979, a season capped with a Super Bowl victory, and played a second year before being beaten out by David Trout in the ’81 preseason and moving on to the San Francisco 49ers. He was traded to Cleveland four games into the season and, while there were concerns about the length of his kickoffs, Bahr connected on a solid 13 of 20 field goal tries. Following a lesser year in 1982, he rebounded in ’83 to lead the NFL with an 87.5 field goal percentage (21 of 24).​

Bahr spent another five seasons with the Browns, although injuries were a factor when he tore knee ligaments while making a tackle in 1986 that cost him the remaining four games that year, the postseason, and most of ’87. After kicking 143 field goals and 248 extra points, resulting in 677 points for the Browns, Bahr moved on to the New York Giants in 1990 and, in addition to 17 field goals in 13 regular season contests, booted five field goals against the 49ers in winning the NFC Championship game 15-13. He also was successful on both of his three-point attempts in the one-point Super Bowl win over Buffalo. After two more years with New York, Bahr started the 1993 season with Philadelphia, who waived him in December, and finished up with New England, where he kicked a career-high 27 field goals in ’94. He played one more season for the Patriots (and was cut in the 1996 preseason in favor of rookie Adam Vinatieri) and concluded his 17-year career with 300 field goals out of 415 attempts (72.3 %), 522 extra points, and 1422 points, which ranked ninth in NFL history at the time.​


I remember how relieved a lot of us were after Parcells brought in Barr to replace "Missin Sissin". Parcells drafted Sissin because he was supposed to be a great bad weather kicker. Unfortunately Sissin couldn't kick well in bad weather, or good weather for that matter. I also can't believe Barr turned 65. Time surely does fly!
 

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