PatsFans.com - Mobile
PatsFans.com
Search

April 19 in Pats History: Phil Bissell creates Pat Patriot

2020 Patriots Season:
Upcoming Opponent:
Next Up: N/A

Current Patriots Twitter Feed:

jmt57

Moderator
Staff member
Today in Patriots History
Pat Patriot and a Pats Hall of Famer
( Dedicated to @italian pat patriot )


April 19, 1960
Cartoonist Phil Bissell drew what would become known as Pat Patriot as part of his newspaper duties.




Pat gets his name from that first cartoon. Courtesy Phil Bissell

Great article on Bissell with some Patriot history here:
The Story Behind Patriot Pat from the Cartoonist Who Created Him

In 1960, Boston Globe cartoonist Phil Bissell, working for $25 a day, was handed an assignment that would change his life—and the lives of fans of the brand-new AFL football team coming to Boston.
“Sports editor Jerry Nason came to me and he said, ‘They’ve decided to call the team the Boston Patriots. You better have a cartoon ready for tomorrow’s edition.’ I sat down, I drew that cartoon original of Pat in about 45 minutes,” Bissell said. “I thought about it for about two minutes and went to work. I had to get the day’s work out.”
The whereabouts of that original drawing are a source of some consternation for Bissell.
“In those days, I was told I worked for the paper, they owned everything I did, and that was all there was to it,” he said. “And I told them at that time, a cartoonist should be able to get his material back, and what they were being paid—what I was being paid—should just be for use of that cartoon.”
After submitting it for publication, Bissell never saw the original drawing again.
“When the cartoon appeared in the paper, Nason took it, he gave it—G-A-V-E—he gave it away to Billy Sullivan, who was the owner of the Patriots,” Bissell said.
To make matters worse, the drawing would meet an untimely demise. As Bissell describes it, “It went up in flames in Billy Sullivan’s summer home on Cape Cod with all the original cover programs.”
That said, Bissell describes his relationship with Sullivan, who owned the Patriots from 1960 to 1988, as one of the best he’s ever had.
“When he got the cartoon, he wrote me a very nice letter thanking me because Jerry said I gave my permission for them to have it. It never happened,” Bissell said.
Upon learning about this miscommunication, Sullivan called Bissell into his office and not only paid him $100 for the use of his illustration, but hired him to create the artwork for the team’s now-famous program covers—placing an inordinate amount of trust in the cartoonist.
“Billy Sullivan told me, ‘I don’t want to see any of your covers until I enter the stadium, because when I see the covers in the hands of the people, and they are getting a smile out of it, I know the cartoons have been successful,'” Bissell said. “And that’s the way Billy Sullivan worked. He was an awful good egg.”











I was going to check out his book, but $987.25 for a paperback?!!!
Two years ago I saw it was $599 and I thought it was a typo ($5.99) but apparently not; it is an out of print highly coveted collector's item.


PatsPa!: 65 Years of Cartoons, Caricatures & Creating a Football Icon | Amazon


Another good article here, focusing on how the book above came to be, as well as his history.


“I have two real sons, Steve and Chris, and I consider Pat to be my third son,” Bissell said one afternoon recently while sitting in his living room.​
So, on April 18, 1960 — interestingly enough, the 185th anniversary of Paul Revere’s legendary midnight ride — Bissell sat down at his desk in the Globe newsroom. Within 45 minutes, he had come up with the rendering of the grizzled and intense Colonial soldier hiking the football, That cartoon was on the front page of the Globe the next day.​
“I drew him and I named him and then he was stolen from me by Jerry Nason,” Bissell said, referring to then-Globe Sports Editor Jerry Nason. “I sat down and within 45 minutes it was ready to go to press.”​
According to Bissell and his account in his book, Nason took the original drawing and gave it as a gift to Sullivan, who then decided that the Pat Patriot logo would be the Patriots’ official logo for the 1961 season — replacing the hideous tri-corner cap logo the team wore in its inaugural season.​
“The following Monday, I received a phone call from Pat’s new parent thanking me for releasing my son to him,” Bissell wrote in his book. “I held back my tears as I informed Mr. Sullivan that I never offered to give him up or was I even given the chance to hug him, just once, before he ended up in his new parents’ arms.”​
Sullivan, he wrote, ultimately paid him $100 to use Pat as the team logo.​






His first sports cartoon was published when he was fourteen. After going to Boston School of Practical Arts, he did a stint in the army. He then became an office boy for the Christian Science Monitor, soon graduating to be their sports cartoonist. He was sports cartoonist for the Boston Herald and Boston Globe (1953-65). He designed the official logo of the Boston Patriots. His cartoon art is on display in the halls of fame for baseball, football, basketball, and hockey.​
 

jmt57

Moderator
Staff member
Today in Patriots History
Patriots Hall of Famer Announcer

Gil Santos
Born April 19, 1938 in Acushnet
Died April 19, 2018 in Raynham




Patriots Hall of Fame: Gil Santos

Gil Santos was the voice of the Patriots for 36 seasons – touching five decades. The venerable Santos called 743 career Patriot games and earned the moniker “Voice of the New England Patriots.” Patriots owner and CEO Robert Kraft surprised Santos with the announcement that the legendary radio broadcaster would become the 20th person to be inducted into the Patriots Hall of Fame and just the second non-player to earn the honor as a contributor for his off-field contributions to the team. It is the highest honor the team can bestow an individual.
Santos began calling games for the Boston Patriots at Fenway Park in 1966. For the first five seasons, he provided color analysis alongside veteran play-by-play man Bob Starr. When the team moved to Foxborough in 1971, Santos moved into his current role as play-by-play voice of the Patriots (1971-79).
WBZ lost the Patriots radio rights in the 1980s, but got them back in 1991 at which time it returned Santos to his natural position as Voice of the New England Patriots, a position he held for the 22 more seasons until his retirement following the 2012 season. The veteran play-by-play broadcaster was also the sports director of WBZ News Radio in Boston, where he earned dozens of awards and honors for his reporting, sportscasting and play-by-play excellence.
He retired from WBZ after 38 years in 2009 and was inducted into the Massachusetts Broadcasters Hall of Fame that year. In addition to his work at WBZ, the skilled play-by-play broadcaster also called basketball games for the Boston Celtics and Providence Friars, as well as football games for the Penn State Nittany Lions, Boston College Eagles, Brown Bears and Boston Breakers of the USFL. Inducted 2013.





 

Tony2046

PatsFans.com Supporter
PatsFans.com Supporter
2019 Weekly Picks Winner
Today in Patriots History
Pat Patriot and a Pats Hall of Famer
( Dedicated to @italian pat patriot )


April 19, 1960
Cartoonist Phil Bissell drew what would become known as Pat Patriot as part of his newspaper duties.




Pat gets his name from that first cartoon. Courtesy Phil Bissell

Great article on Bissell with some Patriot history here:
The Story Behind Patriot Pat from the Cartoonist Who Created Him

In 1960, Boston Globe cartoonist Phil Bissell, working for $25 a day, was handed an assignment that would change his life—and the lives of fans of the brand-new AFL football team coming to Boston.
“Sports editor Jerry Nason came to me and he said, ‘They’ve decided to call the team the Boston Patriots. You better have a cartoon ready for tomorrow’s edition.’ I sat down, I drew that cartoon original of Pat in about 45 minutes,” Bissell said. “I thought about it for about two minutes and went to work. I had to get the day’s work out.”
The whereabouts of that original drawing are a source of some consternation for Bissell.
“In those days, I was told I worked for the paper, they owned everything I did, and that was all there was to it,” he said. “And I told them at that time, a cartoonist should be able to get his material back, and what they were being paid—what I was being paid—should just be for use of that cartoon.”
After submitting it for publication, Bissell never saw the original drawing again.
“When the cartoon appeared in the paper, Nason took it, he gave it—G-A-V-E—he gave it away to Billy Sullivan, who was the owner of the Patriots,” Bissell said.
To make matters worse, the drawing would meet an untimely demise. As Bissell describes it, “It went up in flames in Billy Sullivan’s summer home on Cape Cod with all the original cover programs.”
That said, Bissell describes his relationship with Sullivan, who owned the Patriots from 1960 to 1988, as one of the best he’s ever had.
“When he got the cartoon, he wrote me a very nice letter thanking me because Jerry said I gave my permission for them to have it. It never happened,” Bissell said.
Upon learning about this miscommunication, Sullivan called Bissell into his office and not only paid him $100 for the use of his illustration, but hired him to create the artwork for the team’s now-famous program covers—placing an inordinate amount of trust in the cartoonist.
“Billy Sullivan told me, ‘I don’t want to see any of your covers until I enter the stadium, because when I see the covers in the hands of the people, and they are getting a smile out of it, I know the cartoons have been successful,'” Bissell said. “And that’s the way Billy Sullivan worked. He was an awful good egg.”











I was going to check out his book, but $987.25 for a paperback?!!!
Two years ago I saw it was $599 and I thought it was a typo ($5.99) but apparently not; it is an out of print highly coveted collector's item.


PatsPa!: 65 Years of Cartoons, Caricatures & Creating a Football Icon | Amazon


Another good article here, focusing on how the book above came to be, as well as his history.


“I have two real sons, Steve and Chris, and I consider Pat to be my third son,” Bissell said one afternoon recently while sitting in his living room.​
So, on April 18, 1960 — interestingly enough, the 185th anniversary of Paul Revere’s legendary midnight ride — Bissell sat down at his desk in the Globe newsroom. Within 45 minutes, he had come up with the rendering of the grizzled and intense Colonial soldier hiking the football, That cartoon was on the front page of the Globe the next day.​
“I drew him and I named him and then he was stolen from me by Jerry Nason,” Bissell said, referring to then-Globe Sports Editor Jerry Nason. “I sat down and within 45 minutes it was ready to go to press.”​
According to Bissell and his account in his book, Nason took the original drawing and gave it as a gift to Sullivan, who then decided that the Pat Patriot logo would be the Patriots’ official logo for the 1961 season — replacing the hideous tri-corner cap logo the team wore in its inaugural season.​
“The following Monday, I received a phone call from Pat’s new parent thanking me for releasing my son to him,” Bissell wrote in his book. “I held back my tears as I informed Mr. Sullivan that I never offered to give him up or was I even given the chance to hug him, just once, before he ended up in his new parents’ arms.”​
Sullivan, he wrote, ultimately paid him $100 to use Pat as the team logo.​






His first sports cartoon was published when he was fourteen. After going to Boston School of Practical Arts, he did a stint in the army. He then became an office boy for the Christian Science Monitor, soon graduating to be their sports cartoonist. He was sports cartoonist for the Boston Herald and Boston Globe (1953-65). He designed the official logo of the Boston Patriots. His cartoon art is on display in the halls of fame for baseball, football, basketball, and hockey.​

Wow. Thank you for that. That's an amazing piece of Pat's history.
 

Tony2046

PatsFans.com Supporter
PatsFans.com Supporter
2019 Weekly Picks Winner
Today in Patriots History
Patriots Hall of Famer Announcer

Gil Santos
Born April 19, 1938 in Acushnet
Died April 19, 1938 in Raynham




Patriots Hall of Fame: Gil Santos

Gil Santos was the voice of the Patriots for 36 seasons – touching five decades. The venerable Santos called 743 career Patriot games and earned the moniker “Voice of the New England Patriots.” Patriots owner and CEO Robert Kraft surprised Santos with the announcement that the legendary radio broadcaster would become the 20th person to be inducted into the Patriots Hall of Fame and just the second non-player to earn the honor as a contributor for his off-field contributions to the team. It is the highest honor the team can bestow an individual.
Santos began calling games for the Boston Patriots at Fenway Park in 1966. For the first five seasons, he provided color analysis alongside veteran play-by-play man Bob Starr. When the team moved to Foxborough in 1971, Santos moved into his current role as play-by-play voice of the Patriots (1971-79).
WBZ lost the Patriots radio rights in the 1980s, but got them back in 1991 at which time it returned Santos to his natural position as Voice of the New England Patriots, a position he held for the 22 more seasons until his retirement following the 2012 season. The veteran play-by-play broadcaster was also the sports director of WBZ News Radio in Boston, where he earned dozens of awards and honors for his reporting, sportscasting and play-by-play excellence.
He retired from WBZ after 38 years in 2009 and was inducted into the Massachusetts Broadcasters Hall of Fame that year. In addition to his work at WBZ, the skilled play-by-play broadcaster also called basketball games for the Boston Celtics and Providence Friars, as well as football games for the Penn State Nittany Lions, Boston College Eagles, Brown Bears and Boston Breakers of the USFL. Inducted 2013.






It's amazing that Gil did all of that in less than 24 hours.
 

jmt57

Moderator
Staff member
Happy 69th birthday to Mark van Eeghen
Born April 19, 1952 in Cambridge
Patriot FB, 1982-1983; uniform #34
Claimed off waivers from Oakland on September 7, 1982


Mark van Eeghen was born in Massachusetts, grew up in Cranston Rhode Island, and went to college at Colgate. The Raiders released him at the end of training camp after they had drafted Marcus Allen, and the Pats picked him up at the age of 30.

In his time with the Patriots van Eeghen appeared in 24 games with 16 starts, totaling 860 yards from scrimmage with three touchdowns. A bit of trivia: his daughter Amber became a Patriot cheerleader, and later married Dan Koppen. In his post-NFL career van Eeghen returned to Rhode Island, working in commercial insurance.

While he did spend his last two NFL seasons in Foxboro, van Eeghen is primarily known as an Oakland running back, a major part of two Super Bowl championships. In ten NFL seasons van Eeghen scored 41 touchdowns, rushed for over 1,000 yards three times, and totaled 8,234 yards from scrimmage. In 1973 Mark rushed for 1,273 yards (in a 14-game season), which was second most in the NFL that year. He also had another 737 yards and four touchdowns during the playoffs.





Happy 26th birthday to Chase Winovich
Born April 19, 1995 in Jefferson Hills, PA
Patriot edge defender, 2019-; uniform #50
Selected in the 3rd round (77th overall) of the 2019 draft, from Michigan

In two seasons Winovich has not missed a game, accounting for 11 sacks, 22 QB hits, 74 tackles, 10 tackles for a loss, two pass deflections and a forced fumble. As a rookie he was on the field for 29% of the Pats defensive snaps, and 56% of the special team snaps. In 2020 Winovivh took on a larger role, starting nine games while increasing his playing time to 58% of the defensive snaps and 46% of ST snaps.





April 19, 1973
Pats trade Jim Cheyunski, Halvor Hagen and Mike Montler to Buffalo for Edgar Chandler, Jeff Lyman and Wayne Patrick.

At the Cheyunski had been the Patriots starting MLB for the last four seasons; he would continue as a starter for four more years, two each with the Bills and Colts. Hagen had lost his starting job at guard in '72; he was moved to defensive end and spent three seasons with Buffalo. Mike Montler would play center for six more years, four as part of the offensive line that was blocking for OJ's record setting years.

Edgar Chandler replaced Cheyunski at MLB and lasted one season before being cut. Lyman was a linebacker who was traded away for a bag of footballs early in training camp, and never played in the NFL again. Similarly RB Wayne Patrick was waived, and never again played in the NFL.

The net total for the Patriots was one season (12 games, 11 starts) while Buffalo's net was nine seasons, 105 games and 83 starts.

This was one of the worst trades in Pats history, despite some stiff competition.



April 19, 1991
The Patriots trade away the #1 pick of the draft to the Dallas Cowboys, who use that selection on DT Russell Maryland. In exchange the Pats receive the #11 pick (Pat Harlow), a second (#41, Jerome Henderson), Ron Francis, David Howard and Eugene Lockhart.

Maryland may not have lived up to the expectations that come with being a number one pick, but he was better than the sum of what the Pats received in return. Harlow was a four-year starter at right tackle before Bill Parcells replaced him with Max Lane in '95. Tuna traded Harlow to Oakland for a 2nd, which seemed like a great deal. However, Parcells traded that 2nd for a 3rd, 4th, and 5th, and none of those three ever did anything. Henderson was a free safety who was sent packing early in his third season, Howard and Lockhart were old linebackers that lasted two seasons before retiring, and Francis never played another down in the NFL.

Another bad trade, though somewhat salvaged by Harlow's contributions.



This next one turned out to be a much better trade:


Pioli also stated that he and Belichick secretly met with Dillon in order to get to know him a little bit prior to making the trade. Since he was still under contract with the Bengals at that time, now that this news is public, will the NFL take draft picks away from the Patriots for tampering?



April 19, 1988: Patriots sign free agent kicker Jason Staurovsky
The 5'9 kicker from Tulsa would spend four seasons with the Patriots, though 1990 was the only time he was the Pats kicker for all 16 games. Staurovsky did not have the strongest leg, but he kept coming back in relief of inaccurate or injured kickers; in 40 games he connected on 50 field goals and 57 extra points for the Pats.



April 19, 2000: Patriots sign 19 undrafted rookie free agents
The only name from the long list of UDFAs I recognized was Lonie Paxton, from Sacramento State and the Big Sky Conference in the FCS. Paxton earned three super bowl rings while playing in all but three games over his nine years with the Patriots.





One other pro football player born on this date with New England connections:

Joe Scibelli was born April 19, 1939 in Springfield MA
Died December 11, 1991 at the age of 52 in Boston

Scibelli was a western Mass native: born in Springfield, graduated from Springfield Cathedral High School, and attended American International College in Springfield. He transferred to Notre Dame and then spent 15 years at right guard for the Los Angeles Rams. Scibelli played in 202 NFL games, plus six playoff games.


Joe Scibelli (71) clears a path for Rams RB Les Josephson, circa 1967​
 

Wax Frog

Experienced Starter w/First Big Contract
Semi-OT - I've often wondered why the logo below doesn't get much love. Is it because it was so short-lived, or too basic? It intrigues me more than Pat as a throwback, looks very old-timey (and this is in no way meant as a throwdown on the latter). Maybe, as I'd mentioned elsewhere, it's because I missed out on it due to being a bit too young and not being a NE 'local'.

 
Last edited:

jmt57

Moderator
Staff member
Semi-OT - I've often wondered why the logo below doesn't get much love. Is it because it was so short-lived, or too basic? It intrigues me more than Pat as a throwback, looks very old-timey (and this is in no way meant as a throwdown on the latter). Maybe, as I'd mentioned elsewhere, it's because I missed out on it due to being a bit too young and not being a NE 'local'.

Some of that may be due to it being difficult to figure out what the logo is, when seen by itself. It's obvious when the tricorn is on top of the head of someone dressed in late 18th century attire, but is rather vague when viewed as a drawing with no other point of reference.

Flying Elvis avoided those issues because by that time sports fans were already familiar with the Patriots, another obstacle the tricorn had to overcome. By comparison Pat Patriot was relatively clear in what the logo was representing (football and a 'patriot'/revolutionary war soldier).
 

captain stone

Hall of Fame Poster
April 19, 1991
The Patriots trade away the #1 pick of the draft to the Dallas Cowboys, who use that selection on DT Russell Maryland. In exchange the Pats receive the #11 pick (Pat Harlow), a second (#41, Jerome Henderson), Ron Francis, David Howard and Eugene Lockhart.

Maryland may not have lived up to the expectations that come with being a number one pick, but he was better than the sum of what the Pats received in return. Harlow was a four-year starter at right tackle before Bill Parcells replaced him with Max Lane in '95. Tuna traded Harlow to Oakland for a 2nd, which seemed like a great deal. However, Parcells traded that 2nd for a 3rd, 4th, and 5th, and none of those three ever did anything. Henderson was a free safety who was sent packing early in his third season, Howard and Lockhart were old linebackers that lasted two seasons before retiring, and Francis never played another down in the NFL.

Another bad trade, though somewhat salvaged by Harlow's contributions.

That our GM (whoever he was...Dick Steinberg still?) didn't DEMAND Dallas' 1992 first-rounder as part of ANY trade-down scenario is, in the words of President Carter, a Disgrace to the Human Race.
 

Actual Pats Fan

PatsFans.com Supporter
PatsFans.com Supporter
The venerable Santos called 743 career Patriot games and earned the moniker “Voice of the New England Patriots.”
The best football play-by-play announcer I ever heard, calling games for our home team.

Professional, informative, humble, aware and really, the most inspirational. We're spoiled with Johnny Most, Fred Cusick and some great Sox announcers, along with John Carlson.

But Gil is my top choice to call a football game.
 

Actual Pats Fan

PatsFans.com Supporter
PatsFans.com Supporter
“When the cartoon appeared in the paper, Nason took it, he gave it—G-A-V-E—he gave it away to Billy Sullivan, who was the owner of the Patriots,” Bissell said.
The story I heard is that young Patrick Sullivan saw the cartoon in the Globe and pointed it out to his dad. Could be part of the story.

Stunning that even our opponents who hate us nevertheless admire, like and prefer our real logo and uniform. Compassion and empathy from the most unlikely source. Perhaps, the greatest proof that Kraft made the wrong decision.
 
Last edited:

Patjew

PatsFans.com Supporter
PatsFans.com Supporter
The best football play-by-play announcer I ever heard, calling games for our home team.

Professional, informative, humble, aware and really, the most inspirational. We're spoiled with Johnny Most, Fred Cusick and some great Sox announcers, along with John Carlson.

But Gil is my top choice to call a football game.
I loved Cousy as a color guy for the Cs in the 80s. Mon ami...
 

Top