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  1. DaBronxPats14

    DaBronxPats14 Rotational Player and Threatening Starter's Job

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    I wasn't really impressed by our running game with BJGE and now it's like running back by committee to me. I can't imagine D coordinators losin sleep over having to defend our runnin game and sayin Pats have 2 potent areas to concentrate on. As much of a passin attack we always had it's still relevant to have a BONIFIED REAL RUNNING BACK because some where in that crucial spot of a crucial game Pats MUST control'da clock move those chains and take a knee. All these RBs are nice but unless somebody is gonna step up and be that Dillon/Faulk guy it's still one sided O to me........
    Thoughts???
     
  2. VJCPatriot

    VJCPatriot Pro Bowl Player

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    Right now the Pats runningback group looks like this:
    Ridley, Vereen, Woodhead, Faulk, Addai

    vs the Pats RBs in 2007:
    Maroney, Morris, Faulk

    We have a lot more depth in 2012. So I'm not worried too much about our RBs, especially if Ridley emerges as the star I think he can be when given the full time starter's role.

    The Pats goto will still be the passing game simply because we are loaded at QB, WR, and TE. It would be crazy not to use those weapons. I think we have enough at RB to keep defenses honest.

    It would have been nice to draft say Doug Martin. But then we would have missed out on Hightower. So I am fine with how the Pats went in the draft and they got a solid vet in Addai to back up Ridley in case of injury.
     
  3. Ron Sellers

    Ron Sellers 2nd Team Getting Their First Start

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    I would like to think that either Ridley and/or Vereen can step up and be that player. There was a much greater need to focus on defense in the draft than on another RB. Considering how much cap space the top veteran RBs take up and how short their careers tend to be after so many hits, I don't think it would have made sense to go after a guy like Steven Jackson, that others here coveted.

    As for BJGE, he played hurt all year; that's why you saw the drop from 4.4 ypc to 3.7, from 1008 yards rushing to 667. He's never going to be the guy that gives you highlight reel 40-yard runs, but that doesn't mean that he's not a solid and worthwhile player.


    Let's see what Ridley and Vereen can actually do first before we write off the unit as a whole.
     
  4. TyronePoole

    TyronePoole Banned

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    Other than the fumbles, when he played Ridley looked like a stud last year. So I'd like to see what he has before I label him a bust like Shonn Greene. We know nothing about Vereen either. Or Bolden. Unless you are going to trade for a stud or draft one high, both of which would have detracted from greater areas of need on this team, then it makes sense to go with this group and see who emerges.
     
  5. Gronkandez

    Gronkandez 2nd Team Getting Their First Start

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    The League trend is away from the one workhorse running back and toward a RB by committee. It's inevitbale that RB's will get hurt and get worn down quickly so if you only have one workhorse, the team is in a bad position when he goes out. There is also an economic piece. Large monetary commitments to an injury prone position isn't smart business.

    Let's look at teams with one stud RB. Minnesota (AP), Chicago (Forte), Philly (McCoy), Pitt (Mendehall), Balt (Ray Rice), Oakland (DMC). In all these instances either the team isn't competitive or the RB has suffered a major injury recently, with the exception of Ray Rice. FWIW Forte and Rice are both in contract disputes.

    Vereen and Ridley are very talented backs who had a shortened training camp last year and needed time during the season to learn the offense, how to block better etc. Make no mistake, these guys, in addition to Woodhead, are poised for a big season IMO. The Pats have handled the situation exactly right. Instead of worrying about this postion, fans should be excited. BJGE was solid but he had NO breakaway potential. You'll all see the difference next year.
     
  6. Aßßynormal

    Aßßynormal PatsFans.com Supporter PatsFans.com Supporter

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  7. PATSYLICIOUS

    PATSYLICIOUS Pro Bowl Player

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    #12 Jersey

    I'm satisfied with Ridley, Vereen, Woodhead, and a veteran addition at RB for depth. Addai is not the guy I wanted but I'm hoping and guessing BB saw something in him that most of us didn't since 2008. Given the fact that in today's market it would've cost us $5M/year to sign a guy like BGJE I'll gladly take this group right now at the current cost (assuming Addai was signed for very cheap).
     
  8. mayoclinic

    mayoclinic PatsFans.com Supporter PatsFans.com Supporter

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    ESPN's Bill Williamson thinks there's a good chance that the Broncos could cut RB Knowshon Moreno in training camp:

    Mailbag: Knowshon Moreno's future - AFC West Blog - ESPN

    Josh McDaniels drafted Moreno 12th overall in 2009, and I wouldn't be at all surprised to pick up Moreno if he became available. He's 4 years younger than Addai, and a very versatile "flex back" who would be adept in the passing game. It may take another year for him to fully recover from his ACL injury, but he could be a useful piece in a "too many weapons to cover" offense.
     
  9. patchick

    patchick Moderatrix Staff Member PatsFans.com Supporter

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    #50 Jersey

    Last year, with BJGE in the fold, Patriots RBs carried 377 times for 1,573 yards. I'll predict that the 2012 RB corps easily eclipses those numbers.
     
  10. PATSYLICIOUS

    PATSYLICIOUS Pro Bowl Player

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    I'm not a fan of Moreno but WOAH, welcome back to the forums mayo! Your insight was missed man, glad you are posting again (unless I'm going blind and just havent noticed you posting)
     
  11. mayoclinic

    mayoclinic PatsFans.com Supporter PatsFans.com Supporter

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    The rushing attack in 2011 was not only the worse since 2005, the RBs were the least involved in the offense in any time over the past 5 years. Here's a year by year breakdown of how the RBs were used in the offense, in terms of both rushing and passing:

    2006:

    The 2006 season was notable for a lack of good WRs, with Deion Branch holding out and David Givens gone as a FA. TB had Reche Caldwell, Doug Gabriel and Jabar Gaffney. Not surprisingly, the offense used the RBs and TEs a lot. The offense averaged 25.7 PPG and the pass/rush ratio was almost even (527 pass attempts, 499 rushes, or 51:49). The pass/rush TD ratio was 55%/45% (25/20). The Pats rushed 499 times for 1969 yards, for a rather pedestrian 3.9 YPC average and 20 rushing TDs. Of the pass attempts, just over half went to the WRs (272/527 = 52%). The other 49% was divided fairly equally between the RBs (113/527 = 21%) and TEs (141/527 = 27%). The completion % of passes targeted at RBs was quite high (89/113 = 79%, compared with an overall completion rate of 62%), with an average YPC to RBs of 8.5 (755 yards receiving on 89 receptions). The rushing attack plus the RBs used in the passing game accounted for 70% of all offensive plays (712/1026), 49% of total yards from scrimmage (2724/5559) and 53% of all TDs (24/45).

    The 2006 offense was very balanced, but the lack of receivers clearly dictated some of that balance. Brady's 61.8% completion rate and 6.8 YPA average were lows - and that included the RBs having an almost 80% completion rate. The completion rate to WRs and TEs was 57% in both cases. That offense was good enough to get the Pats to within 1 minute of their 4th SB appearance. A couple of key receptions would have been decisive.

    2007:

    The FO clearly decided that more help was needed in the WR category going into 2007, and they loaded up with a vengeance: Kelly Washington and Donte Stallworth in FA, Wes Welker signed to an offer as an RFA and then acquired in trade, and finally a draft day trade for Randy Moss. Again, a change in personnel to some extent dictate the offense, which moved to a vertical spread attack. The rushing attack was not abandoned, but clearly assumed a subsidiary role. The offense averaged a record 36.8 PPG and the pass/rush ratio shifted slightly in favor of the passing game (586 pass attempts, 451 rushes, or 56:44). The pass/rush TD ratio was heavily skewed at 50/17 (75% pass/25% rush). The Pats rushed 451 times for 1849 yards, for a 4.1 YPC average and 17 rushing TDs. Of the pass attempts, pver 73% went to the WRs (430/586). Only 4 WRs caught passes, and Moss and Welker accounted for 52% of all pass targets by themselves. The TE target % dropped dramatically to 10.2% (including 3 receptions by Mike Vrabel as an eligible TE). The RBs were targeted 15% of the time, with a 74% completion rate and 6.8 YPA (well under the 8.3 average for all passing attempts). The rushing attack plus the RBs used in the passing game accounted for 52% of all offensive plays (537/1037), 36% of total yards from scrimmage (2432/6708) and 27% of all TDs (18/67) - all significant reductions from 2006.

    Again, personnel to a certain extent permitted - if not dictated - the direction in which the offense was taken. The 2007 offense was clearly much less balanced than 2006, but much more explosive, shattering previous records. The WRs received most of the focus of the offense, an increase mostly taken from the TEs but also from the RBs to a lesser extent. The rushing attack and use of RBs as receives was not abandoned, but it clearly assumed a lesser role as the offense went vertical, which shattering early results. But the rest of the league started to catch up to the spread offense in the second half of the season, and the offense was far from overpowering in the playoffs and SB, where it was held to 14 points. Few fans seemed interest in balance in the face of the offensive blitzkrieg.

    2008:

    It's not clear if the 2008 offense would have differed dramatically from 2007 had it not been for a key personnel change: the season injuring ACL tear suffered by Tom Brady in the opener against Kansas City. That resulted in the untested Matt Cassel being inserted at QB, and the offense was adjusted to a considerable extent to favor and protect him. This was done by reverting back to a more balanced approach emphasizing the rushing attack, and keeping risks to a minimum. The offense averaged 25.6 PPG and the pass/rush ratio shifted back to near equality (534 pass attempts, 513 rushes, or 51:49). The pass/rush TD ratio also equalized at 21:21. The Pats used an RBBC committee approach to rush 513 times for 2278 yards (4.4 YPC average) and 21 TDs. The passing offense was not as vertical as 2007, but not as conservative as 2006 - WRs accounted for 66% of all targets, with TEs remaining constant at 10% and RBs picking up the difference, increasing their receiving involvement to over 20%. The rushing attack plus the RBs used in the passing game accounted for 57% of all offensive plays (599/1047), 50% of total yards from scrimmage (3031/6068) and 57% of all TDs (24/42).

    The 2008 offense was clearly more balanced and conservative than 2008 but much less explosive. However, 25.6 YPG average is misleading, because it included Brady's injury and the transition to a new, inexperienced QB. The offense was damped down considerably the first half of the season, averaging only 21 PPG. But the team averaged over 30 PPG the last 8 games of the season (and almost 33 PPG if you exclude the season-ending 13-0 ice-bowl win over Buffalo; the team scored 47 or more points in 3 of those 7 games, including a blowout over SB-bound Arizona), as Matt Cassel matured and the offense began to open up more. The offense rushed for over 142 YPG over that 8 game span, with over 122 yards rushing in every game. It would have been interesting to see how the 2008 offense would have performed in the playoffs, but the Pats were nosed out despite an 11-5 record and a 6-2 finish. Personally, I think they may well have made a run similar to those made by the 2005 Steelers, 2006 Colts, 2007 and 2011 Giants, and 2010 Packers, all of whom peaked late to squeak into the playoffs, only to win it all. People think of the 2008 offense as conservative, but that was mostly in the first half of the season as Matt Cassel got his sea legs. The offense down the stretch was nearly as explosive as 2007, and much, much more balanced.

    2009:

    The return of Tom Brady brought great hopes for 2009. Unfortunately, the loss of UFA WR Jabar Gaffney left the Pats without a viable 3rd receiver, and the lack of production from the TEs and the rushing attack resulted in a predictable offense that, while explosive at times (especially a 59-0 blowout of Tennessee week 6), could all too easily be shut down. This resulted in a series of losses involving second half meltdowns as opposing defenses made adjustments and shut down the Pats' offense.

    The 2009 offense averaged a record 27.6 PPG(and a mere 24.5 PPG if you exclude the Tennessee blowout). The pass:run balance again became skewed in favor of the passing game (592 pass attempts vs 466 rushes, or back to the 56:44 ratio of 2007). The pass/rush TD ratio also shifted towards the passing game at 28:19 (60:40). The Pats rush ed 466 times for 1921 yards (4.1 YPC average) and 19 TDs. The lack of a viable 3rd WR imited the WR percentage of the passing attack to 62%, but Moss and Welker accounted for 50% by themselves, and 17 of the 28 TDs. TEs involved remained constant at 10% and RBs involvement decreased slightly to 18%, with an average of only 6 YPA. The rushing attack plus the RBs used in the passing game decreased slightly to 54% of all offensive plays (571/1058), 39% of total yards from scrimmage (2529/6461) and 43% of all TDs (20/47).

    The 2009 produced some impressive efforts, but it was personally my least favorite offense of the past 5 years. It was all Moss and Welker, and that was all too easily countered by good defenses. The inability of the offense to score in the second half was a constant plague.

    (continued due to length restrictions)
     
  12. mayoclinic

    mayoclinic PatsFans.com Supporter PatsFans.com Supporter

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    (continued from previous post)

    2010:

    After 3 consecutive seasons of anemic TE performance, BB let Ben Watson walk in FA and cut Chris Baker, leaving the Pats without any TEs. They then went out and signed FA Alge Crumpler and took advantage of the strongest TE draft class in memory to draft both Rob Gronkowski and Aaron Hernandez. Although the Pats started out with an offense similar to 2007/2009 - with Brandon Tate reasonably effective as the 3rd WR - the adjustment of defenses to the spread offense and the quick development of both Gronkowski and Hernandez allowed BB to trade Randy Moss 4 games into the season and totally redefine the offense around the TEs. TB had his best season since 2007 and earned his 2nd MVP, with a 37:5 TD:INT ratio including the longest streak without an interception in NFL history.

    The offense averaged 32.4 PPG and the pass/rush ratio was fairly even (507 pass attempts, 454 rushes, or 53:47). The pass/rush TD ratio was almost 2:1 (37/19, or 66% passing/34% rushing). The Pats rushed 454 times for 1973 yards and a 4.3 YPC average (their best since 2008, perhaps due to the superb blocking of Alge Crumpler) and 19 rushing TDs. Laurence Maroney was traded and BJGE emerged as a 1000 yard back, the first since Corey Dillon in 2004. The percentage of passes targeted at the WRs dropped significantly to 56% (10% down from 2009), with the TE percentage increasing correspondingly to over 26%, and the RBs accouting for 17% (86/507 for 609 yards, or a little over 7 YPA, with a 71% completion rate). The rushing attack plus the RBs used in the passing game accounted for 56% of all offensive plays (540/961), 43% of total yards from scrimmage (2582/5995) and 46% of all TDs (21/46).

    The 2019 offense was a radical departure from 2007/2009, virtually redefining the offense are the TEs. However, this included a very effective rushing attack, in part due to the use of 3 TE sets and Alge Crumpler, who had been instrumental in Chris Johnson's 2000 yard rushing season the year before in Tennessee. Nevertheless, in the playoffs the Jets dropped 8 men into coverage and dared the Patriots to run the ball, highlighting the need for more run/pass balance and integration.

    2011:

    It seemed as though the FO recognized the need for a stronger and more integrated rushing attack. The Pats drafted OLs Nate Solder and Marcus Cannon in the 2011 draft along with RBs Shane Vereen and Steven Ridley, and blocking TEs Lee Smith and (UDFA) Will Yeatman. Those moves seemed to clearly signal more of an interest in a power running attack, as well as more use of the RBs as receivers, especially with the trade back to draft Shane Vereen in the 2nd round. But it didn't work out that way. The lockout and short preseason affected the rookies' ability to get on board. Vereen held out briefly and then injured his hamstring. He was a non-factor with only 15 carries and no receptions for the season. Yeatman and Smith were both cut at the end of training camp, but other teams snatched them up before the Pats could sign them to the PS. Alge Crumpler's shoulder injury kept him out of action as well. As a result, the 2011 team used much less 3 TE sets and really had no depth behind Gronkowski and Hernandez at TE.

    Injuries to the OL probably also affected the running game. Although Brian Waters was superb, Dan Koppen broke his leg and went on IR, and Sebastian Vollmer missed much of the season with back troubles. As a result, the run blocking was probably not up to the level of 2010. The Pats seemed to abandon the running game somewhat, instead relying even more on the TEs, with historic results. The offense averaged 32.1 PPG with an offense heavily skewed towards the pass (612 pass attempts, 438 rushes, or 58:42, the most lopsided ratio in the BB/TB era). The pass/rush TD ratio was over 2:1 (39/18, or 68% passing/32% rushing). The Pats rushed 438 times for 1764 yards (4.0 YPC average) and 18 rushing TDs, the lowest rushing yardage since 2005. The TEs dominated the passing game, with Gronkowski and Hernandez targeted 39% of the time (237/612), with an 71% completion rate. WRs were targeted just under 50% of the time (303/612), and the RB target % dropped as well to a low of 9.5% (58/612), with a 65% completion rate, which was also lower than usual, as was the 6.25 YPA average. As a result, the rushing attack plus the RBs used in the passing game accounted for only 47% of all offensive plays (5496/1050), 30% of total yards from scrimmage (2127/7021) and 32% of all TDs (18/57).

    The 2011 offense not only failed to address the issues with the rushing attack from 2010, it moved towards a more unbalanced offense, with little in the way of either a vertical threat attack or an effective rushing game or use of running backs as receivers. As such, it moved towards the 2009 offense in terms of preditability. 3 players (Welker, Gronkowski and Hernandez) accounted for 40% of all offensive plays. The offense became even more predictable when one of those 3 players missed time or was injured, as was the case with Aaron Hernandez during the season and Rob Gronkowski for the Super Bowl and part of the AFCCG. The offense was held to 18.5 PPG in these 2 contests, almost 2 full TDs below it's season average.

    Summary:

    There has obviously been considerable difference in the offense from year to year, and in the role of the RBs. BB has clearly been looking for certain key elements for the offense - one can view Dan Graham and Ben Watson as a failed attempt to create a Gronk/Hernandez kind of combo. Laurence Maroney was certainly an attempt to draft a "FlexBack" with rushing/receiving skills. There seemed to be clear signs that the Pats with the last draft that the Pats were moving towards RBs who could be integrated into the running game and the capability to run a power offense with the same personnel as the base passing offense.

    But there are obvious cases where the offensive direction was clearly influenced, and even on occasion dictated, by the personnel. The lack of receivers in 2006 pushed the offense towards a TE/RB direction. The injury to Brady in 2008 pushed the offense towards a more conservative approach with more reliance on the rushing game. And without Gronk and Hernandez, BB would not have been able to jettison Randy Moss and redefine the offense through the TEs.

    Personally, my "favorite" offense was probably the 2nd half of 2008, when Matt Cassel started to get comfortable and show flashes of being a Brady understudy and the rushing attack was the best it has every been - probably even including Corey Dillon and the 2004 SB season. I'd like to replicate that kind of offense with Brady at the helm, but with some restraint on the passing game and more balance and integration of the running game. But that's JMHO.

    The Pats have obviously shown that you can craft a potent offense in a number of different ways. They've also shown that a potent offensive isn't enough - the most explosive offense in NFL history was shut down in the 2008 SB. Injuries and defensive adaptation can erode an explosive offense that is not balanced and diversified. Balance, diversification and depth are needed as well. And disguise is one of the most potent advantages to an offense - it is so much harder for a defense to stop the opposing team when it is not clear what they are doing. The element of surprise tends to overwhelm even experienced defenses - look at how the Pats responded the first time Miami unleashed the Wildcat, vs. the second time when they were able to prepare for it.

    Where Do We Go From Here?

    Some of the problems with the rushing attack in 2011 were due to injuries to the offensive line and the lack of a 3rd blocking TE - Alge Crumpler played a big role in Chris Johnson's 2000 yard season with Tennessee in 2009, and he helped the rushing attack quite a bit for the Pats in 2010. Others were due to injuries and inexperience from the rookies. Nevertheless, the 2011 team both used the RBs less and used them less effectively than any other Pats team in the past 5 years. This, combined with the lack of an outside pass threat, made the offense too predictable and too easily stopped by playoff caliber defenses.

    Whether these issues can be addressed with existing personnel or whether additional personnel are needed is an oen question. However, the coaching staff in 2011 seemed to give up on the rushing attack and use of RBs to a certain extent, and that has got to change for the offense to be less predictable.

    Personally, I'd love to see the RBs integrated more into the passing game and the offense become less predictable. I love the way the 2009 and 2011 Saints teams used the RBs as both rushing and receiving weapons. Since the Pats seem to be moving towards a group of RBs who can be effective in both the running and passing game, I'm hoping that they are moving in that general direction.
     
  13. mayoclinic

    mayoclinic PatsFans.com Supporter PatsFans.com Supporter

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    Thank you for your generosity. It's appreciated.
     
  14. patfanken

    patfanken Experienced Starter w/First Big Contract

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    #91 Jersey

    lMayo Clinic, my man, a great effort and kudo's from a man who appreciates posts that take 2 blocks of band width to finish. Not only great effort, great insight.

    Actually I'm very comfortable with our RB situation knowing that there will be more emphasis on it this season. I'm comfortable with the talent of the RB's with the only question being can both Vareen and Ridley do it over the course of a full season.

    I see us carrying 5 RBs this season with Woodhead, Ridley, Vareen, Addai and a FB (the best who comes out of the Darwinian struggle at that position) If one of the camp fodder or Boldin, who some already have adopted as their TC binky, outplays Addai, then Joe will be cut. More likely Boldin will join Ebert and Ebner on the PS this season.

    BTW- not only would I like to see us run the ball about 100 times more this season, I'd like to see Brady use his RB's more as outlet receivers as well.
     
  15. patchick

    patchick Moderatrix Staff Member PatsFans.com Supporter

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    #50 Jersey

    Thanks for a tremendous review, Mayo.

    I know I'm more sanguine about the trio of Ridley, Vereen and Woodhead than most. In part, that's probably just blind optimism about Vereen and -- not blind, but let's say "nearsighted" -- optimism about Ridley. In part, it's also that I consider Danny Woodhead to be a proven, effective NFL running back (just not one who can carry the whole load).

    And in part, it's that I see BJGE's departure as addition by subtraction, rather than a big hole that needs filling. I fully appreciate what he brings to the table, I just think that he was the wrong back for this offense. This offense begs for versatile, three-down running backs.
     
  16. mayoclinic

    mayoclinic PatsFans.com Supporter PatsFans.com Supporter

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    It was literally no work at all - at least not today. All saved from a prior PM a few weeks ago. :D Thank God for saved messages.

    I'm relatively comfortable with our RB situation. I badly wanted Doug Martin in the 2012 draft, but I doubted it would happen. But we have plenty of talent, and I have a lot of confidence in Ridley/Vereen.

    There's a numbers crunch on both offense and defense. It's darned hard to keep 3 QBs, 5 RBs, 3 TEs, 6-7 WRs and 9-10 OLs. The high side of the numbers works out to 28 players on offense. And it's just as crowded on defense. Something will have to give. Personally, I value RBs and TEs more than WRs because of their greater versatility, but I'm in the minority. I think that 4 RBs are a given, and 5 as you suggest quite probable, but we'll just have to see how things play out in camp.
    I too view BJGE's departure as addition by subtraction. Not that I had anything against him, but I also want "versatile, three-down running backs" who integrate into the offense, and the Law Firm didn't fit that mold.

    Off The Grid divides RBs into "flex backs" who can be moved around in different positions, including the slot and out wide at flanker, and "power backs". Vereen, Woodhead, Faulk and Moreno fit in the first group. Addai, Hightower, Ridley and Bolden fit into the latter. While there's some validity to the distinction, I don't see why "power backs" can't also integrate into the passing game. Pierre Thomas, Arian Foster and Matt Forte are prototypical power backs with ridiculous receiving skills. Ditto Doug Martin. Ridley, Bolden, Addai and Hightower are all decent receivers, and while they may not be moved into the slot or split out wide they offer reasonable schematic versatility and disguise on offense. Laurence Maroney started out as a versatile back. By 2009 it was clear that every time he was put in the game the Pats were going to run the ball. Same thing with Benny. I don't want that.
     
  17. mayoclinic

    mayoclinic PatsFans.com Supporter PatsFans.com Supporter

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    Bump. Nice read from Richard Hill at Pats' Pulpit on the RB situation:

    Projecting the Patriots Backfield and Defending Fullbacks - Pats Pulpit

    It will be interesting to see how Josh McDaniels uses the RBs in the offense, both for running and as receivers. McDaniels is generally associated with the spread offense, but in 2008 (his last year as OC for the Pats) he modified the offense when Tom Brady was injured to feature much more run-pass balance. The offense the last 8 games of the season averaged over 142 YPG rushing and 33 PPG. Not too shabby.

    Although offenses have generally become more pass-oriented, it is still possible to have an explosive "passing offense with a supporting running game" in which the rushing attack is more than a footnote, and in which the RBs are integral parts of the passing attack. New Orleans featured such an approach in 2009 and 2011, coincidentally averaging 142 YPG rushing both years, averaging over 130 YPG both years. And, like the 2008 Patriots, they did it with a RBBC approach in which no back had more than 1000 yards rushing (in fact, no back had more than 793 yards rushing from those 3 teams).

    If the Pats end up keeping 5 RBs including a FB (with 4 active on gameday), I think it would be a very strong indication that the backs are to figure prominently in the offense.
     
  18. Off The Grid

    Off The Grid Experienced Starter w/First Big Contract

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    #3 Jersey

    [​IMG] My apologies, Brother Mayo, as I don't believe I've been as clear as I might've been:

    ~ In my warped view of the Universe, I consider any back ~ regardless of weight ~ who is a legitimate threat in the Run Game and the Pass Game to be a Flex Back.

    ~ Hence, Steve Jackson ~ 230 Pounds!! ~ fully meets my criteria for a Flex Back.

    ~ For that matter, so does our boy Mike Tolbert, at 243 Pounds!! :eek:

    ~ "Power Backs" and "Scat Backs" I define as limited "Specialists".

    ~ Power Backs can't take it outside or catch it effectively and reliably: BenJarvus Green.

    ~ Scat Backs can't Block or take it up the middle without risking their lives: We have none.

    ...But that's just my twisted view on the Universe. :D
     
  19. mayoclinic

    mayoclinic PatsFans.com Supporter PatsFans.com Supporter

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    In that case I would argue that Stevan Ridley and Brandon Bolden both have the ability to be used as large flex backs, wherease BJGE fundamentally did not.

     
  20. mayoclinic

    mayoclinic PatsFans.com Supporter PatsFans.com Supporter

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    I think they have the ability. Whether they're used that way is another matter.

     
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