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Will BB take a gamble on bloodlines again this draft?

Discussion in 'Patriots Draft Talk' started by PATRIOTSFANINPA, Apr 21, 2009.

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  1. PATRIOTSFANINPA

    PATRIOTSFANINPA Rookie

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    Last years draft saw BB take 2 guys who have had relatives in the NFL - Slater from his HOFer dad Jackie and Rudd from his LB brother in Tampa Bay who is a pretty good player

    It was odd to see not 1 but 2 guys with bloodlines in the NFL selected by the Pats and I wonder if it will happen again

    In that regards Clay Matthews is the premiere guy with the bloodlines not to mention his dad played for BB but am not sure of any others with famous athletes

    A bit unrelated but interesting is that James Laurainitis (his last name sounds like a terminal disease :D) is the son of 'Animal' who was the cowrestler of the WWF tag team 'The Road Warriors'

    Any others mentionable?
  2. bakes781

    bakes781 Rookie

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    #12 Jersey

    LOTS!

    Jarius Byrd - The son of former San Diego Chargers cornerback Gill Byrd.

    Darius Butler - Cousin of Baltimore Ravens' running back Willis McGahee.

    Vontae Davis - Brother of 49ers TE Vernon Davis.

    There's more I'm sure.
  3. patsfaninpa

    patsfaninpa Rookie

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    Couldn't resist the obvious.

    Connor Barwin - God

    Seriously, I'll be surprised if we taken C.Matthews Jr. at 23 or 34. The guys you mentioned were late round picks. Not going to risk a first on bloodlines. When their is plenty of film and data out there on tangible things.
  4. Synovia

    Synovia Rookie

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    Theres a big difference in picking a bloodline in the 7th (ruud) and in the first.
  5. mayoclinic

    mayoclinic PatsFans.com Supporter PatsFans.com Supporter

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    Isn't Hacksaw Reynolds' son in the draft somewhere?
  6. jeffbiologist

    jeffbiologist Rookie

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    Last year I referred to these as "Legacy picks". While I will never like the Slater pick, I can understand the fact that there SHOULD be alot lower chance of a "legacy" being a "bust" than a similarly talented player without the pedigree. And while we can suggest lower round picks be used to "gamble" with, hoping to shine dull rocks into diamonds, I have to think that BB simply wants coachable players and NO headcases.
  7. DaBruinz

    DaBruinz Pats, B's, Sox PatsFans.com Supporter

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    What makes you think that the bloodlines for Slater and Ruud was the reason that BB selected them?
  8. Palm Beach Pats Fan

    Palm Beach Pats Fan Rookie

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    I think that he sons of football players have an advantage in the all-important "football is important to me" category which BB rightfully values. They likely grew up with the game being central to their life but rather than shying away from it they came to embrace it. If they have remained close to their dad, they likely have also have had someone in their ear keeping their head on straight about how hard they have to work to make it.

    Sure the skill set has to be there, but it can come with some built-in intangibles with player's and coach's sons. Now when you extend it to cousins and such, it becomes a lot less relevant.
  9. Synovia

    Synovia Rookie

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    Everyone outside the 3rd round has issues, and I think thats part of it. When you draft a legacy in the 7th, you're hoping that he either physically, or mentally, developes like dad.


    IE, if you have a kid who was a good football player, is 22, and is 6'3 210 lbs, and dad was a LB at 6'4 265, theres a good chance that the kid will put on the weight and keep his speed.
  10. PATRIOTSFANINPA

    PATRIOTSFANINPA Rookie

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    No real solid reason,Just a bit unusual when you consider that Slater was not expected until the late 6th or 7th if at all, while Rudd could have been a stab in the dark but when you think of how many college players there were to pick from for the last 4 rounds and 2 of BBs picks happen to be players with a relatives background of NFL experience it makes one say hmmmm ...or at least me to think maybe BB likes players whose bloodlines show HOFers or solid veterans still in the league.

    Don't forget Joe Klecko's son Dan was also taken by BB a few years ago, although Dan could not tie his dads shoelaces when it came to defense and so far I cannot remember any player drafted with prior NFL bloodlines by the Patriots being any good although Slater and Rudd deserve another year or two to develop or get cut.
    Last edited: Apr 21, 2009
  11. SamBamsFan

    SamBamsFan Rookie

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    Paul Coffman's son looks like he'll be taken in the 3rd-4th round also as a TE.
  12. stinkypete

    stinkypete Rookie

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    I think this whole talk about bloodlines is nonsense. You're a football player or you're not.
  13. JoeShmoe

    JoeShmoe Rookie

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    +1

    :rolleyes:
  14. PATRIOTSFANINPA

    PATRIOTSFANINPA Rookie

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    Well,some bloodlines will produce while others will fail

    Most fail to be as good as thier elders,but some turn out to be damn good in thier own right.

    Obviously,Bloodlines are more prevalent in a sport such as horses and horse racing than it would be for humans
    Last edited: Apr 21, 2009
  15. Palm Beach Pats Fan

    Palm Beach Pats Fan Rookie

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    People are talking more about the physical, I'm talking about the mental aspect of the game. Part of what can make you succeed is what is between your ears. You have likely learned more about the game if you grew up with it. Every bio about Bill Belichick cites how his attention to detail, his love for the game, really even his ability to succeed dates clearly back to when he was at his father's side when he was coaching. Some things can rub off. Not always, but more often than you see in players with no family connection to the game.
  16. dryheat44

    dryheat44 Rookie

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    Obviously true. However, kids who grow up around the game are more likely to "respect the game", "carry themselves like a professional", and "take to coaching."

    Nobody's mentioned Brian Robiskie yet? London Fryar? DJ Boldin?

    Oh, and Patrick Chung, who is Eugene's nephew.
    Last edited: Apr 21, 2009
  17. Ungeheuer

    Ungeheuer Rookie

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    I think it has a lot more to do with the mental aspect, agreed. You take a relative of an NFL player and you know he knows the lifestyle, the work requirements, the pressures, etc. Guys who don't have that advantage are going to be surprised by all sorts of things. Moreover it's good to know that a guy who knows how hard the NFL is still wants it.

    Incidentally, Bo Ruud's father also played in the NFL, I think. That's a lot of legacies BB has picked: Slater, Ruud, Klecko, Daniel Graham, and then of course Tully Banta-Cain is I think the nephew of Rodney Rogers.

    Have to also look at Rashad Jennings, whose father played fullback for the Giants.
  18. primetime

    primetime Rookie

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    No he's not. They're not related at all.
  19. Taxed in Maine

    Taxed in Maine Rookie

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    I'd be pleased if they chose Brian Robiskie at 47 or 58.
  20. AzPatsFan

    AzPatsFan Rookie

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    But the point is that Clay Matthews has very little to point to. He never started until half way through his senior season. He has a career total of 3-4 sacks, and is branded a "great" pass rusher? he has zero INTs and his discribed as a "great" pass coverage person.

    He is a PR agents scam, based on an easy story for sportwriters. He has NO PRODUCTION that merits anything more than a second day developmental pick.
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