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What are your religious beliefs?

Discussion in 'Religion and Lighthearted Discussion' started by gomezcat, Aug 20, 2007.

  1. gomezcat

    gomezcat It's SIR Moderator to you Staff Member PatsFans.com Supporter

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    It's time to get something going in here. I was born, and partly raised a Catholic. I went to Mass until I was 10. Then, in my teenage years, I flirted with Evangelical Christianity. That was before my Heavy Metal phase- I've yet to grow out of that.

    Currently, I'm an agnostic. Something or someone created the universe and I don't know what it was. As such, I just can't be an atheist.

    So, what's the story for everyone else?
     
  2. Seymour93

    Seymour93 Experienced Starter w/First Big Contract

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    Born Catholic. Went to the local Catholic church until I was around 8 or so. My dad refused to go to church except for Christmas, so my mom got tired of bringing me and my litter sister because we were pretty hard to handle. Mom started going to the Presbyterian church with my sister because she knew more people who went there such as my paternal grandmother. I go there just for Christmas now. I consider myself agnostic. If I'm to do religion again it will be with the Catholic church as I have more respect for them.
     
  3. Real World

    Real World Moderator Staff Member

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    I'm a catholic and not overly religious in the sense that I don't really go to church. I believe in God. While a believer, I am completely aware that one may, or may not exist (afterall Shaq was traded). I don't think anyone who doesn't believe is evil in any way, or that my God is holier than someone else's. That crap is junk. I think respect is key. When you begin to take your beliefs and impose them onto others, you lose me.
     
  4. Lifer

    Lifer Banned

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    lessee, I was born to a Jewish family that went from being very involved in the Temple ( my father was the first President of the new Reform Synagogue that was built in South Windsor, Connecticut in the early 1960's) to a family that pretty much dropped out of things in the 70's, although we believed in God, it was pretty much a Hes-out-to-get-us relationship.
    I didnt really have a spiritual life into my early adulthood until 1985 at the age of 23 when I hit a bottom with trying to do it all myself and I reached out to God. I had a very strong belief in God for many years that I was sure didnt include Jesus Christ until I was born again in 2005. That has changed everything for me. That relationship is a part of me everyday and it is a pleasure to share it. Its also a pleasure to hear other peoples journeys and I always look forward to doing so.
     
  5. ironwasp

    ironwasp Rotational Player and Threatening Starter's Job

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    There's a theme developing here. I too was raised a Catholic, and practiced until my mid-teens. I didn't so much fall out with religion as found it interfered with other things (sports, chasing girls etc) and just fell away.

    When I got married in 1999 though it was to a practicing Catholic and so I got involved a little again and married in church. But now I cannot reconcile myself to the Church's irresponsible and hypocritical social policy, nor really its fire and brimstone black-and-white certainty of the way the world works. So I've fallen away again (and will therefore obviously go to hell).

    We practice in the Anglican church in our village occasionally, but that is really more of a community thing than a religious thing to me.

    So I still believe in a god of sorts, I'm just not sure who or where he is or what he would make of those who profess to organise the rest of us on his behalf.
     
  6. reflexblue

    reflexblue PatsFans.com Supporter PatsFans.com Supporter

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    #91 Jersey

    There's a theme developing here. I too was raised a Catholic, and practiced until my late teens,then sort of fell away. In collage I read about the "childrens crusade" and realy disliked the Catholic church. But many years later I got into reading the bible,so much so that one fell apart on me. Have come to believe all the major "profets" Jesus, Budda,Mohammid, Zoroaster etc. are all voices of one diety,or entity. I believe in the anthropic principle of the universe, that is it couldn't happen randomly,the odds calculated by one theoretical physicist are 1 in15,000000000000000 that the universe would form the way it has, being able to support life. Thoses are stagering odds if true. I just ordered a couple of books dealing with the subject.One by a philosopher,and one by a T.physacist. As for me know I'm more into the mixing of Christianity,and Buddismmorals and spirituality are pretty much the same in all religeons. As long as people don't go and reinterprit them. Also I wouldn't want to belong to any organized religeon that would have me for a member. ;)
     
    Last edited: Aug 21, 2007
  7. DarrylS

    DarrylS PatsFans.com Supporter PatsFans.com Supporter

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    Holy crap, talk about a consistent theme. Born and raised Catholic, attended catholic schools.. good catholic boy.. got married in the church, then divorced 17 years later. Stopped being involved with the church during that marriage, that was my fault.

    After divorce, essentially banned from catholic church... find this hypocritical, as do not believe that Jesus would want me in a mundane, dead relationship.. instead would want me where I am not, in an alive one.

    Couple of years ago had to go in for some major Kidney surgery, before I went in went to a franciscan chapel for confession.. anyways talked to the priest, told him my sitz. he started telling me about annulment.. almost crapped my pants. In other words, give the church about 5K go through a bunch of hoops, then you will ok in the eyes of the Catholic Church.. don't believe that that is the answer.

    Now do not go to church, except for special occasions, but do stop by an open church light a candle and say a few prayers. Most days I stop for prayer, live a good moral life, dedicated to family.. it is what it is, I am a man who still believes in the basic concepts of the catholic church, but have issues with many of its laws and stands on issues. Most of the laws were made by grey haired men, who never have experienced a good relationship with a woman or ever experienced the intimacy of family life and all of its ups and downs.
     
  8. ironwasp

    ironwasp Rotational Player and Threatening Starter's Job

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    I don't suppose it should be a huge surprise that there is a plethora of Catholics in the NE area, given the history and demography of Boston. But perhaps the rest of us Catholics are attracted for reasons of assimilation...
     
  9. DarrylS

    DarrylS PatsFans.com Supporter PatsFans.com Supporter

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    Not sure if anything makes sense, but this makes as much sense as anything.. grew up hardly knowing any protestant kids, a few Jewish kids.. when I went to BU for graduate school in '82, inundated with gay jewish kids.. found that interesting, and any homophobia I had went away quickly.
     
  10. ironwasp

    ironwasp Rotational Player and Threatening Starter's Job

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    I had a similar experience going to college. I'd been at an independent school in the south west of England, where there were pretty much no blacks, no Asians, no Jews, no anything much other than middle class white kids. (That included the town, which was as undiverse as any I've been to in the UK). I was an oddity being a Catholic as everyone else was Anglican.

    Then I went to colleage in the east (rough) end of London, and it was like being plonked down in the United Nations general assembly. It helped me revise a lot of my world view that was entirely the product of a (relatively) privileged, insulated and ignorant upbringing.

    (btw Where is Block Island Sound? My cousin lives in Newport; is it near there?)
     
  11. fleabassist1

    fleabassist1 In the Starting Line-Up

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    #12 Jersey



    I was born catholic, and about 8 or 9 I was baptised Baptist. After that, I started to loose faith in the Christian god because of personal things that happened to me - so I started experimenting (and studying) with several different religions ranging from Buddhism to some Pagan religions. After studying for years and years, I am still agnostic - searching for what I find as a good fit.
     
  12. Flying Fungi

    Flying Fungi In the Starting Line-Up

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    We are generally known as 'recovering catholics'

    I am good for 12 years of schooling. Something about having my parents 'excommunicated' from our parish because they got divorced started to turn me off.

    Now...I find organized religion to be a source of history and fascinating architecture...

    I'll identify myself as a quantum theorist with spiritual tendencies and no conviction that anything more than **** luck led us to where we are. Consciousness is its own punishment.
     
  13. DarrylS

    DarrylS PatsFans.com Supporter PatsFans.com Supporter

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    In reality it is RI.
     
  14. ironwasp

    ironwasp Rotational Player and Threatening Starter's Job

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    Pretty near then. I love Rhode Island. Visiting my cousin has become one of my favourite trips. It's been about two years now, so I'm excited to be heading to Newport in November.
     
  15. Handel

    Handel Third String But Playing on Special Teams

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    Was raised as catholic (actually my mom wanted that I go to the Church each sunday to forge my character - you know enduring the boredom during 45 minutes- ). I stopped going to church during teen (14-15).

    Became atheist and rather anti-clerical.
     
  16. wistahpatsfan

    wistahpatsfan Pro Bowl Player

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    #75 Jersey

    Born and raised Catholic. Wised-up when I was about ten. Had to go to church by force after and went to Catholic shool until I could get out of the house at 17 on graduation. Parents' divorce caused the dioscese to cut off contributions to my HS tuition and had to quit sports my senior year to work for tuition. Parish shut my mom off, too, at a time when she really needed help. I'll never go back to the HRCC for that alone.

    Now an affirmed athiest (seen and experienced way too many absolutely unholy things). Admittedly, missing the social connections churches offer.

    The only valid religion, IMO, is science. All religions are based in mind control and fairy tales originally designed to protect children and explain things science has yet to understand. There is no life after death or before birth as far as we know....there might be, though, but I'm not giving any money to those who say there is, yet.
     
  17. Miss Gomezcat

    Miss Gomezcat Rookie

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    Erm, I have an Anglican mother and a Jewish father. What does that make me? Sitting on the fence in many ways as I don't feel that I completely belong to either camp. Faith-wise, I'm an agnostic and very nearly an atheist though I can't be a complete atheist without proof that there is no God and I doubt I'll ever get that. Mr G Cat has just observed that this is the closest thing to a post from a non-Catholic, non-Jew so far on this thread.
     
  18. jct

    jct Third String But Playing on Special Teams

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    I am a lifelong Catholic.
    I aspire to be a disciple of Jesus.
    One of my protestant mentors had me study the red letter edition of the bible.
    That is pure wisdom.
     
  19. Fogbuster

    Fogbuster Pro Bowl Player

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    Nice to see this forum cleaned up!! Congrats to those who made it happen.


    As to my beliefs, I was born, baptized, and raised in the Episcopal Church. My dad was very seriously committed to his faith: he took the whole family to church every Sunday; he would lead us in prayer each night before sleep time; and he prayed every morning before he started his day.

    I attended Church, was confirmed, and served as an acolyte (liturgical assistant to the priest leading the service) for five years. I had a spiritual experience with Christ Jesus when I attended my first mid-night Christmas Eve service. My dad had to push me to go, as I was a sleepy teenager, but I am forever grateful to him that he did because it opened my spiritual eyes to the love and grace of God.

    When I went to college, though, my church attendance and spiritual pursuit dropped off, as I became more secular in my thinking: my concerns were focused on "making it big" in the world. Things like money, power, and fame became the "glamorous" attractions in my life. At the same time, however, I could not escape feeling my obligation to God and Jesus and my nation. It was the Vietnam era, so I felt I should join the military to fight militant atheistic communism, which I viewed the biggest threat to America and the world.

    After I went on active duty, however, I began to see that the use of force does NOT provide the lasting solution to human conflicts; I needed to find a better way, a more peaceful way, a non-violent way to end human struggles. But it had to be a way that did not exclude God or people who believed in God and eternal world. I even had another visitation by Jesus when I was working on a farm in New Hampshire and Christ came to me and told me to keep on searching, that he indeed loved me very much.

    Finally, after much searching for about ten years, I met the Unification Church movement in 1975 -- in New York City, of all places. I learned about God's ideal of creation, how Adam and Eve had been given a beautiful world, while being born as God's children, who should fully inherit God's love, life, and lineage. Then I saw how tragically Adam and Eve had been tempted by a rebellious archangel, Lucifer, and how they fell into unprincipled self-centered love, the opposite of God's love for the sake others. The first human ancestors fell into into the false, unGodly love of the archangel, which led to their accusing and hating each other, as well as the serpent archangel. This then later led to the first murder, when Cain killed Abel.

    History has always been working to solve this fundamental problem because the human being has an innate sense of conscience that always seeks goodness. Today this desire for the right and principled way is being pursued by those who realize that God needs true sons and true daughters to grow up pure and true to God's unchanging, eternal, unique and absolute love. I learned this by the life-long support I have received from Jesus and Heaven, who led me to meet the Original True Parents, Father and Mother Moon.

    The Rev. Dr. Sun Myung Moon and his wife, Dr. Hak Ja Moon, have been taking responsibility to educate the whole world about God's ideal and how to realize it, and they have endured unimaginable hardships to fulfill this mission, which is exactly what Jesus and all others have endured when trying to tell the sinful world of God's ideal. But more than Jesus and other saintly people, the True Parents have been able to establish the foundation of God's blessing of marriage to create families of pure, unchanging, eternal true love. It's been done here on earth and can never be removed, indeed, the greatest victory of all time for God.

    I know that my observations will probably elicit skepticism, maybe even hostility. Nevertheless, it is what I have personally experienced and thus is the core of my religious belief, as this thread has asked, "What are your religious beliefs?".


    //
     
  20. Wotan_the_Wanderer

    Wotan_the_Wanderer Third String But Playing on Special Teams

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    Well, followers of the Unification Church are mocked and disparaged enough as is, so it's really not my intention here to perpetuate this intolerance or even to criticize your religion. But I do find the quoted passage above a bit odd. Though Sun Myung Moon has suffered social ostracization, persecution and hardship, especially in the US and his native South Korea, I really can't say it's at all comparable to what Christ is said to have suffered. Obviously, Christ never had mansions throughout the world including Gloucester MA, nor did he own the Washington Times, was once the owner of the international new wire service UPI, nor did he possess extensive holding throughout the world including the Brazilian football clue Sao Paolo. I really wouldn't say Christ or even the Dalai Lama for that matter had such extensive holdings.

    As far as my religious background is concerned, I was born and raised a protestant and attended a Catholic primary school for a few years, but I cannot say I am a practicing Christian given that I only attend church twice a year on Christmas and at Easter. I've also read a bit on other religions both antiquated and current, and have attended Buddhist and Krishna temples as well as Sufi gatherings on many occasions. But when it comes down to it, I do believe in divine order and creation, and am by default a Christian given that one cannot easily dismiss the influence of cultural immersion that began since birth.

    Said all this, I'll be honest and say that at this point in life, my real religious goal is to become a guru of a sex cult in San Diego. :D
     
    Last edited: Sep 22, 2007

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