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April 4th in Pats History: Happy 70th Birthday, John Hannah

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jmt57

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Today in Patriots History
John Hannah


Happy 70th birthday to John Hannah
Born April 4, 1951 in Canton, Georgia
Patriot LG, 1973-1985; uniform #73
Pats 1st round (4th overall) selection of the 1973 draft, from Alabama


  • 9 Pro Bowls
  • 10 All Pro selections
  • Pats All-Decade Team of the 70s
  • Pats All-Decade Team of the 80s
  • Pats 50th Anniversary Team
  • New England Patriots Hall of Fame
  • Uniform #73 retired by Patriots
  • Pro Football Hall of Fame
  • NFL 75th Anniversary All-Time Team
  • Anchor of offensive line for the 1978 team that set the NFL record with 3,165 yards rushing
  • Considered by many to be the best guard in the history of the NFL


John Hannah | Pro Football Hall of Fame Official Site

In 'Offensive Conduct,' NFL Great Hannah Details His 'Living Nightmare'






John Hannah says Bear Bryant 'brainwashed' him about the importance of practice

John Hannah | American football player
 

jmt57

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Staff member
Today in Patriots History
Leon Gray is elected into the Pats Hall of Fame


Whether it was by design or just coincidence, I found it fitting that Leon Gray was elected into the New England Patriots Hall of Fame on John Hannah's birthday.


April 4, 2019: Leon Gray elected into Patriots Hall of Fame

Gray was a third-round draft pick in 1973 by the Miami Dolphins as an offensive tackle out of Jackson State. He was cut by Miami before the start of the season and claimed off waivers by New England. By the 1976 season, he was viewed as arguably the best left tackle in the game. He was a key member of an offensive line that allowed a franchise-low 14 sacks in 1977. Gray teamed with Patriots and Pro Football Hall of Famer John Hannah to form what is generally considered one of the best guard/tackle tandems in NFL history. At the end of the 1976 season, Gray was selected to play in the Pro Bowl – the first of two such honors as a Patriot and the first of four trips to the Pro Bowl during his 11-year NFL career.
In 1976, Gray helped power a Patriots rushing game that averaged 210.6 yards per game (which remains a franchise record) and led the Patriots to their first 11-win season in franchise history. In 1978, Gray once again paved the way as the Patriots surpassed their season rushing record with 3,165 yards, an NFL record that still stands 41 years later. Gray was named a first-team All-Pro by the Associated Press, Pro Football Weekly and the PFWA. He was also selected to the Pro Bowl for the second time.





 

jmt57

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Staff member
Aside from John Hannah there is only one other former Patriot born on this date.


Happy 70th birthday to Arthur Moore
Born April 4, 1951 in Daingerfield, Texas

Patriot DT, 1973-1977; uniform #75
Claimed off waivers from SF on Sept 11, 1973

Arthur Moore was a sixth round 1973 draft pick (149th overall) by the 49ers, out of Tulsa. He was waived as part of final roster cuts at the end of his rookie training camp, and picked up by the Patriots. Moore saw a lot of playing time his first two seasons, but was very limited due to injuries after that. The Pats traded him to Cleveland in exchange for a conditional draft pick on Oct 4, 1977 but he never got on the field with the Browns. Arthur Moore played in a total of 29 games for the Pats, 24 of which came in his first two seasons.


Excerpt from the 1977 Patriots Media Guide:

three year performer at Tulsa who earned all-Missouri Valley honors in 1972. . . once made 23 tackles in a game against Montana. . . played in all but one regular season game as a rookie. . . led team with two blocked field goals as a rookie, and also had four sacks to his credit. . . shared nose tackle spot with Ray Hamilton in 1974 until sidelined by injury. . . was having a standout year until knee injury forced him to the sidelines for last three games. . . placed on physically unable to perform list for 1975 season. . . played in first four games of 1974 before being forced to the sidelines for the remainder of the year with a gastric condition.​



After six seasons playing for the National Football League, former defensive tackle Art Moore was poisoned by rivals. Doctors told Moore he would probably die.​
This near-fatal event was the catalyst that eventually turned the 6-foot-6-inch athlete into the senior pastor of the Yes I Can! church in Baton Rouge.​
Moore and his wife Gail, a professional singer, started Yes I Can! as a non-profit in 1979.​


Past the pain - [225]

Arsenic. Lye. Pipe cleaner.​
Combined, these three poisons changed the trajectory of Art Moore’s life, but in a way no one would have expected.​
Off the field, Moore lived the high life, drinking heavily and using drugs. It was going into his sixth season in the league when, according to Moore, a jealous former teammate who had been cut mixed a toxic cokctail and served it to him. The drink savaged Moore’s entire digestive tract. Unable to eat or even hold down an aspirin, he took medical leave from the NFL and was laid up in the hospital for many weeks.​



Former professional football player Art Moore has done charity work all over the country. He recently moved to South Mississippi from Baton Rouge, LA. Now, he's looking to spread his message of hope and inspiration across the coast.​
Standing 6'6", in the 1970s, Art was known as one of the most dominant defensive lineman in the NFL.​
"They say I hold the most single season tackles against OJ Simpson," Art said. "I played against the Namaths and the Terry Bradshaws."​
Art spent six seasons with the New England Patriots when he said his career was cut short after a near death experience. That experience led to a life changing encounter.​
 

jmt57

Moderator
Staff member
There are also several former NFL players with ties to the New England region born on this date.

  • CB Phillip Gaines, 30 (1991); born in Concord MA. Houston Texans and others, 2014-present.
  • LB John Woodring, 62 (1959); Brown University. Jets, 1981-1985.
  • RB Nick Giaquinto, 66 (1955); Bridgeport CT, Stratford HS, UConn. Miami, Wash 1980-83; SB 17 ring.
  • DL Joe Moreino, 66 (1955); born in Providence RI. Jets, 1978.
  • OT Brian Vertefeuille, 70 (1951); born in Willimantic CT, Windham (CT) HS. Chargers, 1974.
  • LB/C Carl Schuette (1922-75); coached at Brown and Harvard, Boston resident. Lions, Packers, Bills (AAFC)
  • C/LB Ed Gustafson (1922-2012); Dartmouth College. Brooklyn (AAFC), 1947-48.
  • C/OL/LB Chet Gladchuck (1917-1967); Bridgeport CT, Harding HS, Boston College. Steelers, Giants, 1941-47.
  • FB Lee Woodruff (1910-1947); Providence Steam Roller, Boston Braves, 1931-1933.
  • FB Fred DaGata (1908-1980); Fall River, Durfee HS, Boston College, Providence U. Providence Steam Roller, 1931.
 

NormZauchin

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Today in Patriots History
John Hannah


Happy 70th birthday to John Hannah
Born April 4, 1951 in Canton, Georgia
Patriot LG, 1973-1985; uniform #73
Pats 1st round (4th overall) selection of the 1973 draft, from Alabama


  • 9 Pro Bowls
  • 10 All Pro selections
  • Pats All-Decade Team of the 70s
  • Pats All-Decade Team of the 80s
  • Pats 50th Anniversary Team
  • New England Patriots Hall of Fame
  • Uniform #73 retired by Patriots
  • Pro Football Hall of Fame
  • NFL 75th Anniversary All-Time Team
  • Anchor of offensive line for the 1978 team that set the NFL record with 3,165 yards rushing
  • Considered by many to be the best guard in the history of the NFL


John Hannah | Pro Football Hall of Fame Official Site

In 'Offensive Conduct,' NFL Great Hannah Details His 'Living Nightmare'






John Hannah says Bear Bryant 'brainwashed' him about the importance of practice

John Hannah | American football player
From Canton, Georgia to Canton, Ohio.
 

jmt57

Moderator
Staff member
April 4, 1970:
Foxborough is selected to be the new playing site for the Patriots.


On February 1, 1970, the NFL and AFL formally announced their merger, four years after the original agreement. One portion of that plan was that stadiums had to have a capacity of at least 50,000.

The Patriots were one of six teams that had to come up with an idea to comply. Denver had already added a second and third deck to Mile High Stadium to meet the minimum seating limit, and the Bears moved from Wrigley Field to Soldier Field.

The Chiefs and Bills moved into new stadiums that took a bit longer to build (1972 and 1973), while one NFL team was for some reason given a pass on this edict for more than a decade. The Vikings played in Metropolitan Stadium with a capacity that was close, but still under the 50k minimum until 1982. In fact their seating max actually decreased by about 2,000 in 1974, in order to add some luxury suites.


4/4/2000: Patriots reach 30 years in Foxboro | Patriots.com

On April 4, 1970, the organization announced its move to the town after playing 10 years in Boston. The official ground-breaking for a new stadium, which was later named Schaefer Stadium, was held five months later on Sept. 23, and the park was opened nearly one year later.



But by 1968 fellow league owners fed up with Patriots’ inadequate facilities adopted a rule that all franchises by 1970 required a permanent stadium capable of seating at least 50,000 — or risk being relocated to another market. Although the new rule applied to all teams following the AFL-NFL merger, it clearly targeted the Patriots, and was a catalyst for all that followed.
So with the clock ticking, the hunt was on for a permanent location. There were plenty of prospective sites, with Weston, South Boston, Needham, Wilmington, Sturbridge and Salem, N.H. all competing for the club’s attention. In addition, Sullivan was exploring offers from other cities, including Tampa, Memphis and Seattle.
By the beginning of 1970, however, the only substantive proposal involved building a new stadium near Neponset Circle in Dorchester off the Southeast Expressway, a site then occupied by the Neponset Drive-In. The plan had the support of Gov. Frank Sargent, who pledged to file necessary legislation, as well as prominent members of the business community. More importantly, Billy Sullivan had committed to it.
Meanwhile, back in Foxboro, influential insiders were musing over the different scenarios. In particular, Pres Hobson, general manager of the old Bay State Harness Raceway, thought that land just south of the racing oval was a superior location for a pro football stadium. His boss — raceway owner Elias Marcus (E.M.) Loew — thought so too. Loew was a shrewd businessman who made a fortune operating a string of movie theaters, and obviously understood the value of a stadium to his Foxboro holdings.
Hobson also discussed the advantages of Foxboro during a mid-February conversation with his son, Patriot Ledger sportswriter Ron Hobson, saying that Loew might be willing to donate land adjacent to the raceway for a new stadium — and in turn suggested that Ron pursue the idea with Sullivan.




Before the Patriots played at Gillette Stadium | Boston.com

The Foxborough Bay State Raceway was the proposed site of a new Patriots stadium in 1970.
The Boston Patriots had played in various venues in the city for their first 11 seasons, including Fenway Park from 1963 to 1968.




The exterior of the Patriots' new stadium, Schaefer Stadium, in 1971. The stadium was built in just 327 days at a cost of $7.1 million.




April 4, 1961: Patriots trade for Babe Parilli

The Boston Patriots made what turned out to be a significant trade with Oakland on this date in 1961. Parilli was major upgrade at quarterback, manning that position over the next seven seasons. During that time he was a three-time AFL All-Star, highlighted by his 1964 All-AFL season when he led the league in passing touchdowns and passing yardage. The Pats immediately turned around from a last place record in 1960, and finishing second (no wild card back then) four times with records of 9-4-1, 9-4-1, 10-3-1 and 8-4-2. Parilli owned many franchise passing records that lasted for decades, and even to this day is still considered to be one of top four quarterbacks in franchise history.

The Patriots also received RB Billy Lott, who scored 14 touchdowns over three seasons with the team.

The Raiders felt Parilli was an expendable backup to Tom Flores (who later became a Hall of Fame coach for Oakland), due to needs in other areas. In exchange they received FB Alan Miller, Dick Christy and DT Hal Smith. Miller was named to the All-Star team in '61, named a team captain and was the Raiders' MVP in 1965. Christy never played for the Raiders, and ended up with the New York Titans. Smith lasted on season in Oakland, appearing in eight games with three starts.

Definitely a winning trade for the Patriots.




April 4, 1984: Patriots trade for Number One Overall Draft Pick

Four weeks prior to the 1984 draft the Pats make a blockbuster trade with Cincinnati. New England sends the Bengals two firsts (#16, #28) and a tenth (#265) in the upcoming draft, plus a 1985 fifth round pick. The Patriots move up fifteen spots, and utilize the selection on Nebraska WR/PR Irving Fryar.




April 4, 2014: Adrian Wilson released
The Pats had signed the hard hitting five-time Pro Bowl safety in 2013, after twelve seasons in Arizona. Unfortunately there wasn't much tread left on the tires, and he landed on season-ending injured reserve due to an Achilles tendon injury as final roster cutdowns approached. Pleased with the performance of strong safety Duron Harmon, the Pats elected to move on and released Wilson prior to the draft.




April 4, 1991: Patriots hire Ian Pyka as strength and conditioning coach
Pyka was once set to represent the US in the Olympics, but that was derailed due to the boycott of the 1980 Moscow Olympics. Prior to his stint in Foxborough he was the strength and conditioning coach at Tulane and UMass. While he was with the Patriots he met his future wife, a cousin of linebacker Ilia Jarostchuk. He and his wife now run a sports rehab and wellness center in Boca Raton.
 

DarrylS

PatsFans.com Supporter
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2019 Weekly Picks Winner
When the Pats had TC at Bryant, the players used to pass through ropes on the way to the practice field.. a fan could get up real close to them.

When I saw John Hannah up close I realized with a "big, powerful man" he was, his thighs were bigger than my waist.. he played "mean" as though he had something to prove every time he stepped on the field..
 

captain stone

Hall of Fame Poster
April 4, 1970:
Foxborough is selected to be the new playing site for the Patriots.


On February 1, 1970, the NFL and AFL formally announced their merger, four years after the original agreement. One portion of that plan was that stadiums had to have a capacity of at least 50,000.

The Patriots were one of six teams that had to come up with an idea to comply. Denver had already added a second and third deck to Mile High Stadium to meet the minimum seating limit, and the Bears moved from Wrigley Field to Soldier Field.

The Chiefs and Bills moved into new stadiums that took a bit longer to build (1972 and 1973), while one NFL team was for some reason given a pass on this edict for more than a decade. The Vikings played in Metropolitan Stadium with a capacity that was close, but still under the 50k minimum until 1982. In fact their seating max actually decreased by about 2,000 in 1974, in order to add some luxury suites.


4/4/2000: Patriots reach 30 years in Foxboro | Patriots.com

On April 4, 1970, the organization announced its move to the town after playing 10 years in Boston. The official ground-breaking for a new stadium, which was later named Schaefer Stadium, was held five months later on Sept. 23, and the park was opened nearly one year later.



But by 1968 fellow league owners fed up with Patriots’ inadequate facilities adopted a rule that all franchises by 1970 required a permanent stadium capable of seating at least 50,000 — or risk being relocated to another market. Although the new rule applied to all teams following the AFL-NFL merger, it clearly targeted the Patriots, and was a catalyst for all that followed.
So with the clock ticking, the hunt was on for a permanent location. There were plenty of prospective sites, with Weston, South Boston, Needham, Wilmington, Sturbridge and Salem, N.H. all competing for the club’s attention. In addition, Sullivan was exploring offers from other cities, including Tampa, Memphis and Seattle.
By the beginning of 1970, however, the only substantive proposal involved building a new stadium near Neponset Circle in Dorchester off the Southeast Expressway, a site then occupied by the Neponset Drive-In. The plan had the support of Gov. Frank Sargent, who pledged to file necessary legislation, as well as prominent members of the business community. More importantly, Billy Sullivan had committed to it.
Meanwhile, back in Foxboro, influential insiders were musing over the different scenarios. In particular, Pres Hobson, general manager of the old Bay State Harness Raceway, thought that land just south of the racing oval was a superior location for a pro football stadium. His boss — raceway owner Elias Marcus (E.M.) Loew — thought so too. Loew was a shrewd businessman who made a fortune operating a string of movie theaters, and obviously understood the value of a stadium to his Foxboro holdings.
Hobson also discussed the advantages of Foxboro during a mid-February conversation with his son, Patriot Ledger sportswriter Ron Hobson, saying that Loew might be willing to donate land adjacent to the raceway for a new stadium — and in turn suggested that Ron pursue the idea with Sullivan.




Before the Patriots played at Gillette Stadium | Boston.com

The Foxborough Bay State Raceway was the proposed site of a new Patriots stadium in 1970.
The Boston Patriots had played in various venues in the city for their first 11 seasons, including Fenway Park from 1963 to 1968.




The exterior of the Patriots' new stadium, Schaefer Stadium, in 1971. The stadium was built in just 327 days at a cost of $7.1 million.

My family moved to that same part of Dorchestah in June of 1970...and I would start going to the late, lamented Neponset Drive-In a few years later myself... Didn't know back then just how close I came to being able to walk to home games if Billy Sullivan had gone through with his commitment to build the new stadium there...
 
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PP2

Pro Bowl Player
Legend has it that DB coaches would teach their DB's that they were to fall down if they got stuck in John Hannah's path to avoid getting hurt.

He actually bent someone's facemask while run-blocking, I forgot whose.
 

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