Bruschi was pretty candid regarding opposing players injuries on Thursday. (FILE:Icon/SMI)

You have to love Tedy Bruschi’s honesty.

Obviously when he was a member of the Patriots the plan was obviously to say little and let their talking on the field take care of the rest.  Well Bruschi’s play did enough over the course of his career on the field to be able say what he wants now that he’s no longer playing on it, and the ESPN analyst told ESPN Radio Thursday that he’d target Texans runningback Arian Foster’s hamstring if he was still playing.

Foster recently revealed an MRI photo on Twitter that highlighted white spots which he said were “anti-awesomeness” while referencing his injured hamstring, and Bruschi said that as a defensive player he’d target that area.

“As a defensive player, if this is his hamstring, noting that the sore spot–the white spot he calls ‘anti-awesomeness’–is in the middle of the hamstring, as I’m getting off of a pile, maybe I push,” Bruschi said. “Maybe that’s where I push. Because I know that’s exactly where it is. I give it a little dig. I give it a little twist as I get off the pile. Maybe I do that.”

Bruschi’s comments make you realize potentially why Belichick isn’t overly descriptive when it comes to injuries. The reason is if he told reporters the exact nature of every injury, in a league where winning is everything, obviously any weakness gives the opposition a reason to potentially target an area on that same player when he returns from that injury.  At least if the other team doesn’t know exactly what it is, it prevents potential situations like what Bruschi said he would do if it were him.

It’s obviously a little insight into an NFL world where in most cases if Bruschi was still playing – he obviously wouldn’t have said it.

So credit Bruschi for being able to give fans a little more insight into how players think, since this may give those wondering why we don’t hear an exact injury definition from Belichick a reason to understand why he handles things that way.