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The Cooking Thread

2021 Patriots Season:
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Mon
Dec 6th

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ForThoseAboutToRock

In the Starting Line-Up
Immersion circulators/sous vide machines are gold. Do a roast. The ability to cook forever (more or less) allows you to get amazing tenderness from tough cuts. Need to pay attention to handling/temp guidelines, but worth the brief headache. Fun little gadgets. Can similarly prep burgers en masse, pop em out, sear and serve. Makes a vac sealer almost a requirement, but the uses are endless from there (brine chix parts in vac bags, use less brine, throw out the trash after).

Made some spanish chicken roulletes the other night. Big batch of "dirty beans" for dirty rice/beans. Tonight will be quick meat sauce to wipe out some left over pasta.

Kids have started to realize "dinner is different at dads." They dont have a clue. Two consecutive "south american" dishes w/ a little heat and no objections. Can't wait til I can start playing with heat more consistently.

Not sure where I'm taking the pork loins yet. Tatziki+tabouleh with naan/rice and choice of protein is a household favorite. Works decent with most leftover proteins, and is pretty damn healthy. Feta, kalamatas, etc can take things up a notch.

Whoever mentioned the wife worrying about pork, FDA relatively recently changed safe cook temp guidelines for pork. Medium->med-well is safe, juicey, FDA approved goodness.
funny I started spouting off about sous vide before I read through your post.

I disagree a little about the vac sealer - I've done dozens of SV dishes in 1 gal (or bigger) freezer bags, no problem. Vac sealer might be good - but not a necessity in my book.
 

woolster22

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funny I started spouting off about sous vide before I read through your post.

I disagree a little about the vac sealer - I've done dozens of SV dishes in 1 gal (or bigger) freezer bags, no problem. Vac sealer might be good - but not a necessity in my book.
You can get away with ziplocs or whatever, but once you get that far in, it becomes more of an inevitability.
 
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ForThoseAboutToRock

In the Starting Line-Up
You can get away with ziplocs or whatever, but once you get that far in, it becomes more of an inevitability.
Do you like your vac sealer? I guess I just never bit the bullet and bought one (and I've been a SV acolyte for like 5 years now) because reviewers had so many complaints.
 

Deus Irae

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Modified version of taco spaghetti for dinner tonight. It's a one pan meal that takes less than half an hour.
 
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woolster22

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Do you like your vac sealer? I guess I just never bit the bullet and bought one (and I've been a SV acolyte for like 5 years now) because reviewers had so many complaints.
If you know how to use one (just make sure the lip being sealed is flat) they're great. Mine has a habit of not completely sealing the first attempt. No big deal, I just run the seal cycle twice and have never had a problem. It's a bit of a benefit depending on the application. If I was stuck with the pre-programmed vac times (can just switch to seal mid cycle) I'd hate the thing.

I spent a decade working in kitchens though, ymmv. I'm pretty sure the thing was ~$100. One of the FoodSaver models. Has some hose accessory port for god knows what.

There's peace of mind that comes with a vac sealed bag for sv, again personal preference.
 

Deus Irae

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With the weather sucking the way it did today, soup was in order. So tonight's meal was hamburger soup. Extra heavy on the garlic, and very tasty...
 
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Deus Irae

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A couple of days back, I made a dry-brined pan roasted duck with potatoes and carrots. For any who are interested, but have never tried it, I'll lay out the basics of the way I prepared it this most recent time*.


  1. Remove the innards and neck
  2. Spatchcock the bird (I also like to pop the legs out of their joints, as it makes it easier to cut them off afterwards, but that's a personal preference)
  3. Pat the skin dry, on both sides
  4. Score the skin in a diamond pattern
  5. Place the bird on a sufficiently large baking sheet or roasting pan (It should be just large enough to fit the whole duck in it if it's a roasting pan, or just a bit larger if it's a baking sheet)
  6. Season both sides of the duck with your seasoning a/k/d dry brining mix (Usually something like salt/pepper/sugar)
  7. With the bird skin side up, place the wings underneath the the back
  8. Place the bird, uncovered, in your refrigerator, for 48-72 hours (You can do it for less, but if you're looking for crispy skin, the longer the time, the better)
  9. Take the duck from the fridge and let it sit for 30 minutes or so
  10. Preheat your oven to 375 degrees
  11. Place the duck on a cutting board, pat the duck, gently, on both sides, in order to get any remaining surface moisture
  12. Now is the time to add any additional seasoning you want to the non-skin side of the duck
  13. Cut your potatoes to the same thickness (Say, 3/4 of an inch) and season well. For best results with sopping up the duck drippings, you should only cut up enough potatoes to fit underneath the bird
  14. Place your potatoes in the roasting pan, taking care that they are placed so the heights match
  15. Place the duck on top of the potatoes, skin side up
  16. Now is the time to add any additional seasoning you might want on the skin side of the duck
  17. Place the duck in the oven, and cook until the internal temperature of the breasts reaches 140, rotating the bird after about 20-25 minutes (ovens vary, so start thinking about checking the bird after 40 minutes, but don't be surprised if it takes up to 55 minutes. You just have to find out your exact times based upon your particular oven)
  18. Turn the oven up to 475 degrees
  19. Cook the duck until the skin is brown and crispy (it should take something like 8-12 minutes)
  20. Take the duck out of the oven, tent it loosely, and let it rest for 15 minutes
  21. Cut up the bird, serve, and enjoy!

*The carrots are more of an optional thing, and I don't usually add them when I'm making duck, so I'll leave them out but, if you choose to add them, you should par-boil them for about 5 minutes or so before adding them to the roasting pan when you add the potatoes.
 

Tunescribe

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My simple recipe for nutrition-packed green smoothie. I have some 8-oz. bottles and make this in batches using a Vita-Mix blender, which liquifies everything you put in it and is well worth the $500 price tag. I've had mine about 10 years and use it several times a week, the most powerful countertop blender on the market.

* Organic baby spinach.
* Organic baby kale.
* Kiwi fruit.
* Granny Smith green apples.
* Water (small amount).

Kiwi and apple are dominant flavors although you need to experiment with the ratios of what you put in. Pretty refreshing and a convenient way to get your healthy leafy greens.
 

sean10mm

Rotational Player and Threatening Starter's Job
If I'm just making plain wings just to dip in sauce, I kind of think baking them is better than deep frying them.

Thick side of the skin up @ 450 for 20 minutes
Turn over, lower to 400 @ 30-40 minutes

No effort, crisped up skin, moist meat, practically fall apart.

OTOH real fried chicken (buttermilk brined, breaded/battered & fried) can't be done close to right any other way IMO. The closest I got was a process that ended up making it more greasy than a proper deep frying lol
 

IllegalContact

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If I'm just making plain wings just to dip in sauce, I kind of think baking them is better than deep frying them.

Thick side of the skin up @ 450 for 20 minutes
Turn over, lower to 400 @ 30-40 minutes

No effort, crisped up skin, moist meat, practically fall apart.

OTOH real fried chicken (buttermilk brined, breaded/battered & fried) can't be done close to right any other way IMO. The closest I got was a process that ended up making it more greasy than a proper deep frying lol


I've got a new range coming where the oven has an air-fry mode.......stay tuned
 

sean10mm

Rotational Player and Threatening Starter's Job
I'm also going to be a buffalo wing heretic and say tumbling wings in sauce after crisping them (be it fryer or oven) is a mistake, because you're undoing the crisping action by having sauce sit on them. Sauce on the side & dip as you go like chicken nuggets. But I'm weird like that.

Grilling is a whole other thing, brushing on BBQ sauce or whatever and then letting the fire work on it a bit more works great.

I'm starting to get Hot Wing Takes :rofl:
 

Deus Irae

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I'm also going to be a buffalo wing heretic and say tumbling wings in sauce after crisping them (be it fryer or oven) is a mistake, because you're undoing the crisping action by having sauce sit on them. Sauce on the side & dip as you go like chicken nuggets. But I'm weird like that.

Grilling is a whole other thing, brushing on BBQ sauce or whatever and then letting the fire work on it a bit more works great.

I'm starting to get Hot Wing Takes :rofl:


With the double frying, these are supposed to maintain their crunch, and to be delicious. They're on my list of things to try this summer, but you're more than welcome to beat me to it.
 

Deus Irae

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Tonight, I made a version of Adobo chicken. This version was very much in the sweet/sour mode, with little emphasis on salt, and no emphasis on spiciness. I've preferred other versions of the dish, but this one went over well with the others eating, as they aren't big on spicy food.
 

Deus Irae

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I don't know if any of y'all have ever had a Portuguese pot roast. Tonight, I made a pressure cooker version. It was tasty, especially with the gravy.
 

Deus Irae

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My question is not limited to use in cooking, and is more of an invitation to dialogue, but I'd love to hear people's opinions on Stevia and other non-honey, non maple syrup/sugar, sugar substitutes.
 

Deus Irae

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I cooked up some Korean style pork chops tonight. They were very tasty, and I recommend that those of you who like to experiment a bit give them a try. I need to use thicker chops (3/4" - 1") next time, though, as I mistakenly used thin chops and they did get a little bit dry. They had a nice balance of sweet and heat, and the soy sauce didn't make them too salty.
 

A Defiant Goose

Experienced Starter w/First Big Contract
I got this fat ass delmonico/ribeye I planned to cook for father's day but I was full off all the burgers so I'm saving it for the 4th. I am going to take a risk and try my version of a reverse sear with it by smoking it at a low heat with mesquite wood, and then searing it hot as all hell over some lump charcoal. Really do not wanna **** around and overcook it, so I might end up smoking it til about 100-105 and then searing it for about 45 seconds per side. I can't wait. Been a while since I had a nice big steak
 

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