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May 7th in Pats History: Babe Parilli

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jmt57

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Today in Patriots History
Babe Parilli


Happy birthday to Babe Parilli, who would have been 91 today
Born May 7, 1930 in Rochester, Pennsylvania
Patriot QB, 1961-1967; uniform #15
Died July 15, 2017 at the age of 87
Acquired in a trade with the Oakland Raiders on April 4, 1961




After playing for Bear Bryant at the University of Kentucky, Parilli was the 4th overall pick in the 1952 draft by Green Bay. During the fifties he bounced back and forth between the Packers, Air Force, Browns and Ottawa in the CFL, and then was a backup for the Raiders in 1960.

With an over-the-hill Butch Songin as their starting quarterback, the Patriots were at minimum in need of depth, and preferably a viable alternative at the position. On April 4, 1961 the Pats traded FB Alan Miller, HB Dick Christy and DT Hal Smith to Oakland in exchange for Parilli and FB Billy Lott. Granted it was early in the history of the AFL, but it was the biggest trade in the first half of the league's existence. To say that the Patriots got the better end of that deal would be a vast understatement.



Before the Boston Patriots took the field against the Denver Broncos in the early days of the American Football League, someone broke into the Patriots’ locker room and stole the team’s playbook. That didn’t faze veteran quarterback Babe Parilli, according to his teammate Larry Garron, a running back.

“Babe restructured the entire offense on the fly and we won the game,” Garron recalled. “Babe was our leader. He always had a great read of the defense and I know he made me a better player.”


At the age of 31 the journeyman quarterback's career took off with the Patriots. Parilli became a three-time AFL All-Star, and the Pats became one of the best teams in the league. His 31 touchdown passes in 1965 was a team record that would stand for an amazing 42 years. 42 years!!! In seven seasons with the Pats, Parilli threw 132 touchdown passes, and also ran for 14 more TDs. He led the AFL in completion percentage in 1961, passing yards in 1964, touchdowns in 1964, and was Comeback Player of the Year in 1966. Parilli was durable in an era that was unforgiving, missing just four games during his seven seasons with the Patriots.

“He was a true pioneer and an important part of an era that helped establish the Patriots and the AFL,” said Patriots legend Gino Cappelletti, a receiver and placekicker and later game announcer. “I was real happy he showed up. He had a quick release and delivered the ball to us in the right place at the right time, and he would do anything and everything to win.


Babe Parilli was inducted to the College Football Hall of Fame in 1982, and the Patriots Hall of Fame in 1993. He is a member of the Patriots All-Decade Team of the 1960s, the All-AFL 10-Year Team, Kentucky Pro Football Hall of Fame and also the National Italian American Sports Hall of Fame. After retiring as a player, he was an assistant coach for several NFL teams and a head coach in the World Football League and Arena Football League. Parilli was also a real estate broker and media relations director for the mayor and city council in Commerce City, Colorado.






Babe Parilli | Fenway Park Diaries

Known as the “Rochester Rifle” after his home steel country, Parilli set four NCAA passing records – for touchdown passes in a season and a career, most passes completed and passing yards in three varsity seasons. He was twice a first team All-America selection and finished third and fourth in Heisman Trophy balloting.

In 1960, the American Football League was born, and Parilli went to Oakland where he and Tom Flores divided the qb duties. Traded from Oakland to Boston after the 1960 season along with Billy Lott for Dick Christy and Hal Smith, Babe shared the quarterbacking duties with Butch Songin in 1961. The Pats sent Butch to the New York Titans in 1962, and Babe took over the number one slot. Ably backed up by Tom Yewcic, Babe at last had a team he could call entirely his own.

For the next six seasons, Parilli’s schooling under Bryant paid back all the accrued dividends that Babe’s previous coaches in Green Bay, Cleveland, Oakland, and Ottawa might have collected for their respective teams. With a talented receiving corps that included Gino Cappelletti, Jim Colclough, Artie Graham, Tony Romeo, and Larry Garron out of the backfield, Babe directed an exciting offensive show in virtually every game.

Parilli set every passing record in the young club’s history over seven seasons, and his stats have endured in the Pats’ record books to where he is still now fourth all-time behind Drew Bledsoe, Steve Grogan, and Tom Brady. Babe threw 2,410 times as a Patriot and completed 1,140 passes for 16,747 yards and 132 touchdowns.

The Patriots had a winning record in five of Parilli’s seven seasons and posted an overall mark of went 50-39-9. Babe was a three-time league all-star and the comeback player of the year in 1966 when he led the team to a record of 8-4-2 after a 4-8-2 campaign the previous season.






Parilli bounced around the NFL and even the Canadian Football League before finally finding a home in the American Football League with the Boston Patriots. A three-time AFL All-Star, Parilli had 31 touchdown passes in 1965 which remained a Patriots record until Tom Brady broke it in 2007. Many of those throws went into the hands of Gino Cappelletti, a fellow NIASHF inductee. The flashy duo became known as the “Grand Opera”.

Parilli wasn’t just a pocket passer, he used his legs to amass four yards per rush on 383 career attempts. With a total of 201 career touchdowns including 23 on the ground, Parilli was one of the most successful players in AFL history.



Parilli was the quarterback for the only Kentucky team that has won an outright SEC football championship. The 1950 Wildcats went 5-1 in league play and posted an 11-1 overall record that included a 13-7 victory over previously undefeated Oklahoma in the Sugar Bowl.

Parilli broke the SEC single-season record for passing yards when he threw for 1,627 in 1950, and he broke it again in 1951 when he threw for 1,643.

Parilli was the SEC Player of the Year in 1950, when he finished fourth in the voting for the Heisman Trophy. In 1951, Parilli finished third in the Heisman voting.


Vito 'Babe' Parilli | Beaver County Sports Hall of Fame

Vito (Babe) Parilli ranks as one of the all time star passing quarterbacks in pro football with 1552 completions in 3330 attempts for 22681 yards and 178 touchdowns. What most fans outside the Pittsburgh area don’t realize is that Babe served as quarterback coach of the Pittsburgh Steelers for four seasons (1970-1973) and played a key role in developing the talents of Terry Bradshaw, Terry Hanratty, and Joe Gilliam.​


 

jmt57

Moderator
Staff member
Today in Patriots History
Matt Light Retires


May 7, 2012:
Matt Light retires after eleven seasons with the New England Patriots.










 

jmt57

Moderator
Staff member
Today in Patriots History
May 7th Birthdays


Happy 53rd birthday to Mike Arthur
Born May 7, 1968 in Minneapolis
Patriot C, 1993-1994; uniform #65
Waiver claim from the Bengals on September 1, 1993

Mike Arthur grew up in Houston and went to Texas A&M. He was drafted by Cincinnati and started at center for three years with the Bengals before heading to Foxborough. Arthur started 24 games at center during Drew Bledsoe's first two seasons with the Patriots. He then finished his NFL career as a backup offensive lineman the next two years in Green Bay, earning a ring with the Packers - ironically against his former team, in the Pack's Super Bowl 31 victory over the Patriots.







Happy 56th birthday to Tim Gordon
Born May 7, 1965 in Ardmore, Oklahoma
Patriot safety, 1991-1992; uniform #41
Waiver claim from the Falcons on December 21, 1990

After four years in Atlanta, Gordon played in 21 games for the Patriots with 15 starts over two seasons. In his final NFL season in 1992 he had 39 tackles (25 solo) with two passes defensed. Gordon played in 67 games with 41 starts over six NFL seasons, with eight interceptions and four fumble recoveries (two with the Pats).






Happy 49th birthday to Chris Hayes
Born May 7, 1972 in San Bernardino, California
Patriot FS, 2002; uniform #29
Signed as a veteran free agent on March 12, 2002

Chris Hayes was signed as a veteran free agent in March of 2002, but released at the end of training camp. The Pats re-signed him in early December and he played in the final four games of the 2002 season. As a rookie Hayes was a teammate of Mike Arthur in Green Bay for their Super Bowl 31 victory over the Patriots. Hayes was a special teams ace who played in 84 NFL games from 1996-2002, and apparently caught the eye of Bill Belichick when both were with the Jets prior to playing for the Patriots.






Happy 58th birthday to Benton Reed
Born May 7, 1963 in Baton Rouge
Patriot DE, 1987; uniform #71
1987 strike replacement player

A 10th round pick out of Ole Miss in 1986 by Tampa Bay, Ben Reed appeared in the three replacement games in the '87 strike season. He is now a commercial sales manager in the lumber and building material industry for McCoy's Building Supply in Texas, and his son is a major league baseball player with the San Francisco Giants.





Happy 33rd birthday to Leonard Hankerson
Born May 7, 1988 in Fort Lauderdale
Patriot WR, 2015; uniform #15
Claimed off waivers from the Falcons on December 16, 2015

Hankerson was a third round selection by Washington in the 2011 draft, but he suffered a bad hip injury in his third start and was never really the same after that. In 2013 he blew out his knee and spent most of 2014 on PUP. Atlanta signed him in 2015 but he again landed on IR, this time due to a hamstring injury.

After being waived-injured the Pats signed him for depth due to injuries to Julian Edelman and Danny Amendola. Hankerson appeared in one game for ten snaps with no stats - and was let go just ten days after being signed. Over five NFL seasons Hankerson played in 41 games; he had 107 receptions for 1,408 yards (13.2 ypc) and nine touchdowns.

Hankerson spent two seasons at UMass, first as an offensive graduate assistant (2017) and the next as the wide receivers coach. Next was two years as the outside wide receivers coach for Stephen F Austin State University; he is now the offensive quality control coach for the San Francisco 49ers.

Leonard was able to land these jobs despite an embarrassing cheap shot by Rex Ryan in what turned out to be his final NFL game.








Happy 31st birthday to A.J. Francis
Born May 7, 1990 in Washington DC
Patriot DT, 2013; uniform #69
Claimed off waivers from Miami on September 1, 2013

A day after final roster cuts in 2013 the Patriots acquired four players off waivers, one of whom was Francis (from Miami). He was released on September 7 to make room for Josh Kline, and then signed to the practice squad. In late November the Dolphins signed Francis to their 53-man roster, ending his stint in New England without ever having played in a game for the Pats.

Since then Francis was signed and cut by Seattle, Tampa Bay, Washington and lastly by the Giants in 2018. He appeared in nine NFL games, with 20 tackles. Of his 192 NFL defensive snaps, 164 came with Washington in 2017.





Other players born on May 7 with New England area connections:

Rondell Jones (May 7, 1971) - born in Sunderland MA, the free safety spent five seasons in the NFL with the Broncos and Ravens.

Pat McInally (May 7, 1953) - the Harvard graduate was Cincinnati's punter and wide receiver for ten seasons, earning All-Pro honors in 1981. McInally was enshrined to the College Football Hall of Fame in 2016 and scored a perfect 50 on the Wonderlic test.

Algy Clark (May 7, 1904) - a single wing blocking back and offensive tackle in the thirties, Clark scored one touchdown in 1932 for the Boston Braves.

Dolph Eckstein (May 7, 1902) - Brown University
The Providence Steamroller was an All-Pro center in 1925.

Belf West (May 7, 1896) - Phillips Andover Academy
All-American tackle at Colgate could also pass the ball 70 yards and once kicked a 52 yard field goal - in 1919! West was a first-team All-Pro in 1921 for the Canton Bulldogs.




Also well worth mentioning:

Johnny Unitas (May 7, 1933-Sept 11, 2002) - one of the greatest players in sports history.
 
Today in Patriots History
Babe Parilli


Happy birthday to Babe Parilli, who would have been 91 today
Born May 7, 1930 in Rochester, Pennsylvania
Patriot QB, 1961-1967; uniform #15
Died July 15, 2017 at the age of 87
Acquired in a trade with the Oakland Raiders on April 4, 1961


After playing for Bear Bryant at the University of Kentucky, Parilli was the 4th overall pick in the 1952 draft by Green Bay. During the fifties he bounced back and forth between the Packers, Air Force, Browns and Ottawa in the CFL, and then was a backup for the Raiders in 1960.

With an over-the-hill Butch Songin as their starting quarterback, the Patriots were at minimum in need of depth, and preferably a viable alternative at the position. On April 4, 1961 the Pats traded FB Alan Miller, HB Dick Christy and DT Hal Smith to Oakland in exchange for Parilli and FB Billy Lott. Granted it was early in the history of the AFL, but it was the biggest trade in the first half of the league's existence. To say that the Patriots got the better end of that deal would be a vast understatement.



Before the Boston Patriots took the field against the Denver Broncos in the early days of the American Football League, someone broke into the Patriots’ locker room and stole the team’s playbook. That didn’t faze veteran quarterback Babe Parilli, according to his teammate Larry Garron, a running back.

“Babe restructured the entire offense on the fly and we won the game,” Garron recalled. “Babe was our leader. He always had a great read of the defense and I know he made me a better player.”


At the age of 31 the journeyman quarterback's career took off with the Patriots. Parilli became a three-time AFL All-Star, and the Pats became one of the best teams in the league. His 31 touchdown passes in 1965 was a team record that would stand for an amazing 42 years. 42 years!!! In seven seasons with the Pats, Parilli threw 132 touchdown passes, and also ran for 14 more TDs. He led the AFL in completion percentage in 1961, passing yards in 1964, touchdowns in 1964, and was Comeback Player of the Year in 1966. Parilli was durable in an era that was unforgiving, missing just four games during his seven seasons with the Patriots.

“He was a true pioneer and an important part of an era that helped establish the Patriots and the AFL,” said Patriots legend Gino Cappelletti, a receiver and placekicker and later game announcer. “I was real happy he showed up. He had a quick release and delivered the ball to us in the right place at the right time, and he would do anything and everything to win.


Babe Parilli was inducted to the College Football Hall of Fame in 1982, and the Patriots Hall of Fame in 1993. He is a member of the Patriots All-Decade Team of the 1960s, the All-AFL 10-Year Team, Kentucky Pro Football Hall of Fame and also the National Italian American Sports Hall of Fame. After retiring as a player, he was an assistant coach for several NFL teams and a head coach in the World Football League and Arena Football League. Parilli was also a real estate broker and media relations director for the mayor and city council in Commerce City, Colorado.






Babe Parilli | Fenway Park Diaries

Known as the “Rochester Rifle” after his home steel country, Parilli set four NCAA passing records – for touchdown passes in a season and a career, most passes completed and passing yards in three varsity seasons. He was twice a first team All-America selection and finished third and fourth in Heisman Trophy balloting.

In 1960, the American Football League was born, and Parilli went to Oakland where he and Tom Flores divided the qb duties. Traded from Oakland to Boston after the 1960 season along with Billy Lott for Dick Christy and Hal Smith, Babe shared the quarterbacking duties with Butch Songin in 1961. The Pats sent Butch to the New York Titans in 1962, and Babe took over the number one slot. Ably backed up by Tom Yewcic, Babe at last had a team he could call entirely his own.

For the next six seasons, Parilli’s schooling under Bryant paid back all the accrued dividends that Babe’s previous coaches in Green Bay, Cleveland, Oakland, and Ottawa might have collected for their respective teams. With a talented receiving corps that included Gino Cappelletti, Jim Colclough, Artie Graham, Tony Romeo, and Larry Garron out of the backfield, Babe directed an exciting offensive show in virtually every game.

Parilli set every passing record in the young club’s history over seven seasons, and his stats have endured in the Pats’ record books to where he is still now fourth all-time behind Drew Bledsoe, Steve Grogan, and Tom Brady. Babe threw 2,410 times as a Patriot and completed 1,140 passes for 16,747 yards and 132 touchdowns.

The Patriots had a winning record in five of Parilli’s seven seasons and posted an overall mark of went 50-39-9. Babe was a three-time league all-star and the comeback player of the year in 1966 when he led the team to a record of 8-4-2 after a 4-8-2 campaign the previous season.






Parilli bounced around the NFL and even the Canadian Football League before finally finding a home in the American Football League with the Boston Patriots. A three-time AFL All-Star, Parilli had 31 touchdown passes in 1965 which remained a Patriots record until Tom Brady broke it in 2007. Many of those throws went into the hands of Gino Cappelletti, a fellow NIASHF inductee. The flashy duo became known as the “Grand Opera”.

Parilli wasn’t just a pocket passer, he used his legs to amass four yards per rush on 383 career attempts. With a total of 201 career touchdowns including 23 on the ground, Parilli was one of the most successful players in AFL history.



Parilli was the quarterback for the only Kentucky team that has won an outright SEC football championship. The 1950 Wildcats went 5-1 in league play and posted an 11-1 overall record that included a 13-7 victory over previously undefeated Oklahoma in the Sugar Bowl.

Parilli broke the SEC single-season record for passing yards when he threw for 1,627 in 1950, and he broke it again in 1951 when he threw for 1,643.

Parilli was the SEC Player of the Year in 1950, when he finished fourth in the voting for the Heisman Trophy. In 1951, Parilli finished third in the Heisman voting.


Vito 'Babe' Parilli | Beaver County Sports Hall of Fame

Vito (Babe) Parilli ranks as one of the all time star passing quarterbacks in pro football with 1552 completions in 3330 attempts for 22681 yards and 178 touchdowns. What most fans outside the Pittsburgh area don’t realize is that Babe served as quarterback coach of the Pittsburgh Steelers for four seasons (1970-1973) and played a key role in developing the talents of Terry Bradshaw, Terry Hanratty, and Joe Gilliam.​


 

jmt57

Moderator
Staff member
Your one of the more sane posters on here but for the life of me I can't understand why you wish a happy birthday to dead people.
I hadn't thought of that way, lol... Good question!

I guess it's somewhat similar to celebrating Washington and Lincoln's birthday?

Or just an excuse to get away from the petty arguing on this forum for a moment or two?
 

Pape

In the Starting Line-Up
I hadn't thought of that way, lol... Good question!

I guess it's somewhat similar to celebrating Washington and Lincoln's birthday?

Or just an excuse to get away from the petty arguing on this forum for a moment or two?
Dont change a thing... These are the best posts on the forum...

and thanks for the Hankerson pic... adding it to my ever growing collection
 

Actual Pats Fan

PatsFans.com Supporter
PatsFans.com Supporter
Today in Patriots History
Babe Parilli


Happy birthday to Babe Parilli, who would have been 91 today
Born May 7, 1930 in Rochester, Pennsylvania
Patriot QB, 1961-1967; uniform #15
Died July 15, 2017 at the age of 87
Acquired in a trade with the Oakland Raiders on April 4, 1961


After playing for Bear Bryant at the University of Kentucky, Parilli was the 4th overall pick in the 1952 draft by Green Bay. During the fifties he bounced back and forth between the Packers, Air Force, Browns and Ottawa in the CFL, and then was a backup for the Raiders in 1960.

With an over-the-hill Butch Songin as their starting quarterback, the Patriots were at minimum in need of depth, and preferably a viable alternative at the position. On April 4, 1961 the Pats traded FB Alan Miller, HB Dick Christy and DT Hal Smith to Oakland in exchange for Parilli and FB Billy Lott. Granted it was early in the history of the AFL, but it was the biggest trade in the first half of the league's existence. To say that the Patriots got the better end of that deal would be a vast understatement.



Before the Boston Patriots took the field against the Denver Broncos in the early days of the American Football League, someone broke into the Patriots’ locker room and stole the team’s playbook. That didn’t faze veteran quarterback Babe Parilli, according to his teammate Larry Garron, a running back.

“Babe restructured the entire offense on the fly and we won the game,” Garron recalled. “Babe was our leader. He always had a great read of the defense and I know he made me a better player.”


At the age of 31 the journeyman quarterback's career took off with the Patriots. Parilli became a three-time AFL All-Star, and the Pats became one of the best teams in the league. His 31 touchdown passes in 1965 was a team record that would stand for an amazing 42 years. 42 years!!! In seven seasons with the Pats, Parilli threw 132 touchdown passes, and also ran for 14 more TDs. He led the AFL in completion percentage in 1961, passing yards in 1964, touchdowns in 1964, and was Comeback Player of the Year in 1966. Parilli was durable in an era that was unforgiving, missing just four games during his seven seasons with the Patriots.

“He was a true pioneer and an important part of an era that helped establish the Patriots and the AFL,” said Patriots legend Gino Cappelletti, a receiver and placekicker and later game announcer. “I was real happy he showed up. He had a quick release and delivered the ball to us in the right place at the right time, and he would do anything and everything to win.


Babe Parilli was inducted to the College Football Hall of Fame in 1982, and the Patriots Hall of Fame in 1993. He is a member of the Patriots All-Decade Team of the 1960s, the All-AFL 10-Year Team, Kentucky Pro Football Hall of Fame and also the National Italian American Sports Hall of Fame. After retiring as a player, he was an assistant coach for several NFL teams and a head coach in the World Football League and Arena Football League. Parilli was also a real estate broker and media relations director for the mayor and city council in Commerce City, Colorado.






Babe Parilli | Fenway Park Diaries

Known as the “Rochester Rifle” after his home steel country, Parilli set four NCAA passing records – for touchdown passes in a season and a career, most passes completed and passing yards in three varsity seasons. He was twice a first team All-America selection and finished third and fourth in Heisman Trophy balloting.

In 1960, the American Football League was born, and Parilli went to Oakland where he and Tom Flores divided the qb duties. Traded from Oakland to Boston after the 1960 season along with Billy Lott for Dick Christy and Hal Smith, Babe shared the quarterbacking duties with Butch Songin in 1961. The Pats sent Butch to the New York Titans in 1962, and Babe took over the number one slot. Ably backed up by Tom Yewcic, Babe at last had a team he could call entirely his own.

For the next six seasons, Parilli’s schooling under Bryant paid back all the accrued dividends that Babe’s previous coaches in Green Bay, Cleveland, Oakland, and Ottawa might have collected for their respective teams. With a talented receiving corps that included Gino Cappelletti, Jim Colclough, Artie Graham, Tony Romeo, and Larry Garron out of the backfield, Babe directed an exciting offensive show in virtually every game.

Parilli set every passing record in the young club’s history over seven seasons, and his stats have endured in the Pats’ record books to where he is still now fourth all-time behind Drew Bledsoe, Steve Grogan, and Tom Brady. Babe threw 2,410 times as a Patriot and completed 1,140 passes for 16,747 yards and 132 touchdowns.

The Patriots had a winning record in five of Parilli’s seven seasons and posted an overall mark of went 50-39-9. Babe was a three-time league all-star and the comeback player of the year in 1966 when he led the team to a record of 8-4-2 after a 4-8-2 campaign the previous season.






Parilli bounced around the NFL and even the Canadian Football League before finally finding a home in the American Football League with the Boston Patriots. A three-time AFL All-Star, Parilli had 31 touchdown passes in 1965 which remained a Patriots record until Tom Brady broke it in 2007. Many of those throws went into the hands of Gino Cappelletti, a fellow NIASHF inductee. The flashy duo became known as the “Grand Opera”.

Parilli wasn’t just a pocket passer, he used his legs to amass four yards per rush on 383 career attempts. With a total of 201 career touchdowns including 23 on the ground, Parilli was one of the most successful players in AFL history.



Parilli was the quarterback for the only Kentucky team that has won an outright SEC football championship. The 1950 Wildcats went 5-1 in league play and posted an 11-1 overall record that included a 13-7 victory over previously undefeated Oklahoma in the Sugar Bowl.

Parilli broke the SEC single-season record for passing yards when he threw for 1,627 in 1950, and he broke it again in 1951 when he threw for 1,643.

Parilli was the SEC Player of the Year in 1950, when he finished fourth in the voting for the Heisman Trophy. In 1951, Parilli finished third in the Heisman voting.


Vito 'Babe' Parilli | Beaver County Sports Hall of Fame

Vito (Babe) Parilli ranks as one of the all time star passing quarterbacks in pro football with 1552 completions in 3330 attempts for 22681 yards and 178 touchdowns. What most fans outside the Pittsburgh area don’t realize is that Babe served as quarterback coach of the Pittsburgh Steelers for four seasons (1970-1973) and played a key role in developing the talents of Terry Bradshaw, Terry Hanratty, and Joe Gilliam.​


Like over half a dozen others I take Babe over Bledsoe every day especially on Sundays.
 

Actual Pats Fan

PatsFans.com Supporter
PatsFans.com Supporter
Your one of the more sane posters on here but for the life of me I can't understand why you wish a happy birthday to dead people.
Merry Christmas...

Seriously, it's really important to understand and appreciate the contributions, accomplishments and examples set by folks who passed away. Their birthdays are the best, most fun time to do so. Yeah they're not around to hear you, depending on what you believe about the afterlife, but people benefit today immeasurably from their efforts and sacrifice.

Nothing he or anyone else for that matter ever did diminished Patriots denigration and abuse; but the profound sadness and anger I've felt since Julius Adams passed away has had the biggest effect on me these last several years. Adoration, reverence and exaltation of vastly less deserving Patriots being stroked while they're alive makes me sick.
 
Merry Christmas...

Seriously, it's really important to understand and appreciate the contributions, accomplishments and examples set by folks who passed away. Their birthdays are the best, most fun time to do so. Yeah they're not around to hear you, depending on what you believe about the afterlife, but people benefit today immeasurably from their efforts and sacrifice.

Nothing he or anyone else for that matter ever did diminished Patriots denigration and abuse; but the profound sadness and anger I've felt since Julius Adams passed away has had the biggest effect on me these last several years. Adoration, reverence and exaltation of vastly less deserving Patriots being stroked while they're alive makes me sick.
Jeesh lighten up. This is why I very rarely post on here.
 

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