Lucid dreaming

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KontradictioN

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Anyone here know how to successfully train your brain to do it every night? I've read different websites but I can't seem to get a handle on it. Lucid dreaming is awesome and, when I've been able to do it (which is entirely by accident), I've woken up refreshed and have been able to do things like fly or encounter real life situations in the dream. Supposedly there are certain ways that you can train your brain in order to do it and I'd like any tips if anyone is able to do it successfully.
 

Nikolai

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Only done it by accident myself, but only a few times. I'd be curious to know as well.
 

Galeb

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Anyone here know how to successfully train your brain to do it every night? I've read different websites but I can't seem to get a handle on it. Lucid dreaming is awesome and, when I've been able to do it (which is entirely by accident), I've woken up refreshed and have been able to do things like fly or encounter real life situations in the dream. Supposedly there are certain ways that you can train your brain in order to do it and I'd like any tips if anyone is able to do it successfully.
Realizing that you are dreaming is the first step. The best way I know of to realize you are dreaming is to get into a mode, for all states of consciousness, that you question reality and whether you are dreaming. With apps and cell phone/fitbit notifications you can get reminders every 10 minute (this can be used for many spiritual practices besides this, even multiple practices in a list).

The other hard part is remaining asleep after you become lucid. The first thing is too stay calm. If you get too excited, you trigger your sympathetic system, which almost always wakes the dreamer. Of all the tricks I read, the only one that worked consistently for me was looking at my hands until it became obvious that I wasn't waking. In my experience, this was much easier than realizing I was dreaming.

Remembering dreams and getting a "feel" for what your dream world is like also helps one realize when they are dreaming. Keep a dream journal, and also make a point to remember and record your dreams each time you wake up at night. Do it without movement as the more you move, the more you forget. Not only will this aid in realizing you are dreaming, it can provide tremendous insight once you can reliable decipher what your dreams are trying to tell you.

Some people get addicted to lucid dreaming, and when used in such excess can cause significant damage. Another aspect is that constantly manipulating dreams prevents the normal function of dreams. Dreams during the first cycle through the stages for sleep are where we convert short term memories into long term memories, a critical skill for a variety of reasons. our dreams are also our unconscious mind's most direct method of communication with the conscious mind. Tremendous insight can be gleaned from recognizing the significance of, and deciphering the messages of our dreams.

From personal experience, I can confirm that too frequent manipulation of lucid dreams for indulgence can cause significant damage. It inflated my ego to ridiculous proportions and significantly contributed to a severe dissatisfaction with the world around me. It took a long time to overcome this.

I encourage anyone to explore not just lucid dreaming, but their dream world in general. I also urge caution, and to do so more with the intent of personal growth and development rather than the attempted fulfillment of real world desires.
 
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KontradictioN

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Realizing that you are dreaming is the first step. The best way I know of to realize you are dreaming is to get into a mode, for all states of consciousness, that you question reality and whether you are dreaming. With apps and cell phone/fitbit notifications you can get reminders every 10 minute (this can be used for many spiritual practices besides this, even multiple practices in a list).

The other hard part is remaining asleep after you become lucid. The first thing is too stay calm. If you get too excited, you trigger your sympathetic system, which almost always wakes the dreamer. Of all the tricks I read, the only one that worked consistently for me was looking at my hands until it became obvious that I wasn't waking. In my experience, this was much easier than realizing I was dreaming.

Remembering dreams and getting a "feel" for what your dream world is like also helps one realize when they are dreaming. Keep a dream journal, and also make a point to remember and record your dreams each time you wake up at night. Do it without movement as moving around, as the more you move, the more you forget. Not only will this aid in realizing you are dreaming, it can provide tremendous insight once you can reliable decipher what your dreams are trying to tell you.

Some people get addicted to lucid dreaming, and when used in such excess can cause significant damage. Another aspect is that constantly manipulating dreams prevents the normal function of dreams. Dreams during the first cycle through the stages for sleep are where we convert short term memories into long term memories, a critical skill for a variety of reasons. our dreams are also our unconscious mind's most direct method of communication with the conscious mind. Tremendous insight can be gleaned from recognizing the significance of, and deciphering the messages of our dreams.

From personal experience, I can confirm that too frequent manipulation of lucid dreams for indulgence can cause significant damage. It inflated my ego to ridiculous proportions and significantly contributed to a severe dissatisfaction with the world around me. It took a long time to overcome this.

I encourage anyone to explore not lucid dreaming, but their dream world in general. I also urge caution, and to do so more with the intent of personal growth and development rather than the attempted fulfillment of real world desires.
Thanks for the detailed reply and the warning. I'll be sure to keep a handle on it. When you say you look at your hands, is that something you trained yourself to do while in the dream? Did you build anything ala "Inception"? Why do you think it inflated your ego? The only thing I've ever done in them the few times I've lucid dreamed is fly and have sex with celebrities.
 
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IcyPatriot

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I have serious sleep issues but have been sleeping way better with the Melatonin ... everybody's dose is different and it takes a few days or so to really work. I need at least 30mg to have a decent nights sleep which is way higher than recommended ... I've had some real great dreams on it and some real dark dreams ... like some wtf was that dreams. If I take 40 or 50 sometimes the lucid dreams are better ... but it doesn't happen every night and you really have to catch yourself at the right time.

If you catch yourself a the right time and you know your sleeping you can get it to last a bit longer. Definitely a different experience but I cannot say good or bad ... just different. There's always one or 2 accurate things in the dream and then there's always one or 2 not right. Just last night I had one where I walked up a main road to go to a candy store (a memory from grade school) and I walked in and they had old sneakers for sale and I said to them "The last time you were in my dream you had sneakers also ... you're supposed to be a variety store" ... and I left and next I know I am at a soccer field waiting to get in the game. It was my turn to get in the game and i woke up.

Funny **** is that things you cannot do in real life you also cannot do in a lucid dream ... I suck at soccer and I suck at soccer in my dreams also. I was great at golf and the same in my lucid dreams. They can be a lot of fun and enjoyable but I cannot honestly say it's anything more than that. There are some real scary things that can happen but I dare not type them in detail here ... sometimes you end up in sleep paralysis and that's just not fun and sometimes it feels like something is visiting you ... and I'll leave it at that.

What Galeb said above and I quote it below is very true so I enjoy them now and manipulate them way less unless I catch myself in a real good one which averages about once a week or 2 now .... before it was 3-4 a week and it was too much.I found manipulating dreams affected my medical depression for the worse ... I found lucid dreams just letting them happen made my depression better ... dreaming is necessary for health and mathematical arrangement of the brain ... well for me anyways and that's an entire other subject that I have explored. I refuse to take medication for the depression and have found lucid dreaming and better dreaming and sleep in general to help significantly.
From personal experience, I can confirm that too frequent manipulation of lucid dreams for indulgence can cause significant damage. It inflated my ego to ridiculous proportions and significantly contributed to a severe dissatisfaction with the world around me. It took a long time to overcome this.


 
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Galeb

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Thanks for the detailed reply and the warning. I'll be sure to keep a handle on it. When you say you look at your hands, is that something you trained yourself to do while in the dream? Did you build anything ala "Inception"? Why do you think it inflated your ego? The only thing I've ever done in them the few times I've lucid dreamed is fly and have sex with celebrities.
My ego was inflated because I became lucid almost every night and literally spent hours every night experiencing any fantasy I desired without obvious repercussions. That's a helluva power trip for anyone, never mind a guy in his early 20s. Although it is embarrassing to admit, it literally got to a point where if I felt slighted by a beautiful woman in real life, I would actually plan on ways that I would manifest them and have my way with them when I dreamed that night. **** like that causes serious damage, and has left scars on my soul that may never fully heal.

Although I can't recall a dream in the last several years where I didn't realize I was dreaming, I rarely manipulate them now. Although I still have never accessed the Akashic Record, I have gleaned tremendous insight, on almost a nightly basis, about myself and the world around my by consciously observing and interpretting the meaning behind my dreams.

The hands trick is something I learned from a book. When I first started realizing I was dreaming, I usually got too excited and woke up. Because of that, I started including looking at my hands periodically throughout the day as I questioned whether I was dreaming or not. It didn't take long before I did so almost automatically when realizing I was dreaming. That, and consciously trying to stay calm overcame the waking issue in just a couple of months.

In my drunken state, I missed a couple of helpful tips. While dreaming, writing, especially digital displays, tends to be inconsistent as there is no physical world or shared co-creation that binds them. Often times, the writing or digital display will constantly shift, even while you observe it. Try consciously paying attention to digital displays whenever you see them. For those that wear a watch or frequently check the time on their phone, this method can be very helpful in realizing when dreaming.

People who sleep well typically cycle through all the stages of sleep 4 times in a night, briefly waking between each cycle. Going back to sleep in the morning after we have completed all 4 cycles is when we dream the most. Most enter the dream state almost immediately and only have small pauses between dreams. If you truly seek lucid dreaming, this is the best time to explore it.

Another thing that I found helpful was maintaining awareness as far into sleep as possible. To do so, quiet the mind, and any thoughts you do have, simply observe them. Do not "become" those thoughts as when you do, you are no longer mindful. It's been written that some advanced practitioners can maintain awareness all the way into the deepest stages of sleep, but I've never been able to maintain it past the first stage.

The very cusp of sleep is an amazing state of expanded consciousness. It typically doesn't last long, but when you are at the boundary between waking and sleep, you access much more of your brain than at any other time. Being aware in this state can be extremely satisfying and often ecstatic. With practice, you can extend this state. Although some say it can be extended indefinitely, I haven't been able to maintain it for more than a couple of minutes. Full blown dreams don't typically happen in this state, but fleeting, vivid dream "clips" often occur, and they have a very different feel than real dreams. It truly is an awesome experience where you can feel the top rear of the head tingle intensely as you literally feel your consciousness expand.

Some folks contact spirit guides in their dreams. Although I believe such things are a manifestation of our own consciousness, many believe that you can access the Akashic record through these "beings". I've not been able to do such a thing, but there are people for whom this becomes a powerful and transformative spiritual tool.

As for the building like in inception, that is what dreaming is. Our mind is literally building the entire experience. The more experience you get with it, the more you can manipulate the dreams. While lucid dreaming, I have found it a lot easier to simply travel to a place that I'd imagined that actually transform the entire dream around me. What I have found far more fulfilling is manifesting people. I have long since stopped manifesting living people that I know, but tremendous insight can be gained by manifesting historical and fictional characters.

Manifesting loved ones who have died is perhaps the most powerful experience I've ever had dreaming. Do this enough, and it becomes obvious that we never experience others directly in the physical. We experience a mental representation of others that is created by our minds. In other words, you can never know another outside of yourself. That said, when we experience others, it is more than simply sensory, physical perceptions that we experience. We actually "feel" people. Being in their presence actually changes our state of mind and energy. With enough practice, not only was I able to fully "feel" these people in my dreams, I can now feel them while awake. Words can't describe the joy, acceptance and satisfaction this has brought into my life. It was this realization that made it clear to me that we are indeed energetic beings that are part of a greater consciousness.

Sorry for being long winded and going off on so many tangents, but dream mastery can be such a powerful means of positive transformation that I thought it worth it. If you have any more questions feel free to respond in this thread or PM me. I wish you well in this worthy endeavor.
 
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KontradictioN

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My ego was inflated because I became lucid almost every night and literally spent hours every night experiencing any fantasy I desired without obvious repercussions. That's a helluva power trip for anyone, never mind a guy in his early 20s. Although it is embarrassing to admit, it literally got to a point where if I felt slighted by a beautiful woman in real life, I would actually plan on ways that I would manifest them and have my way with them when I dreamed that night. **** like that causes serious damage, and has left scars on my soul that may never fully heal.

Although I can't recall a dream in the last several years where I didn't realize I was dreaming, I rarely manipulate them now. Although I still have never accessed the Akashic Record, I have gleaned tremendous insight, on almost a nightly basis, about myself and the world around my by consciously observing and interpretting the meaning behind my dreams.

The hands trick is something I learned from a book. When I first started realizing I was dreaming, I usually got too excited and woke up. Because of that, I started including looking at my hands periodically throughout the day as I questioned whether I was dreaming or not. It didn't take long before I did so almost automatically when realizing I was dreaming. That, and consciously trying to stay calm overcame the waking issue in just a couple of months.

In my drunken state, I missed a couple of helpful tips. While dreaming, writing, especially digital displays, tends to be inconsistent as there is no physical world or shared co-creation that binds them. Often times, the writing or digital display will constantly shift, even while you observe it. Try consciously paying attention to digital displays whenever you see them. For those that wear a watch or frequently check the time on their phone, this method can be very helpful in realizing when dreaming.

People who sleep well typically cycle through all the stages of sleep 4 times in a night, briefly waking between each cycle. Going back to sleep in the morning after we have completed all 4 cycles is when we dream the most. Most enter the dream state almost immediately and only have small pauses between dreams. If you truly seek lucid dreaming, this is the best time to explore it.

Another thing that I found helpful was maintaining awareness as far into sleep as possible. To do so, quiet the mind, and any thoughts you do have, simply observe them. Do not "become" those thoughts as when you do, you are no longer mindful. It's been written that some advanced practitioners can maintain awareness all the way into the deepest stages of sleep, but I've never been able to maintain it past the first stage.

The very cusp of sleep is an amazing state of expanded consciousness. It typically doesn't last long, but when you are at the boundary between waking and sleep, you access much more of your brain than at any other time. Being aware in this state can be extremely satisfying and often ecstatic. With practice, you can extend this state. Although some say it can be extended indefinitely, I haven't been able to maintain it for more than a couple of minutes. Full blown dreams don't typically happen in this state, but fleeting, vivid dream "clips" often occur, and they have a very different feel than real dreams. It truly is an awesome experience where you can feel the top rear of the head tingle intensely as you literally feel your consciousness expand.

Some folks contact spirit guides in their dreams. Although I believe such things are a manifestation of our own consciousness, many believe that you can access the Akashic record through these "beings". I've not been able to do such a thing, but there are people for whom this becomes a powerful and transformative spiritual tool.

As for the building like in inception, that is what dreaming is. Our mind is literally building the entire experience. The more experience you get with it, the more you can manipulate the dreams. While lucid dreaming, I have found it a lot easier to simply travel to a place that I'd imagined that actually transform the entire dream around me. What I have found far more fulfilling is manifesting people. I have long since stopped manifesting living people that I know, but tremendous insight can be gained by manifesting historical and fictional characters.

Manifesting loved ones who have died is perhaps the most powerful experience I've ever had dreaming. Do this enough, and it becomes obvious that we never experience others directly in the physical. We experience a mental representation of others that is created by our minds. In other words, you can never know another outside of yourself. That said, when we experience others, it is more than simply sensory, physical perceptions that we experience. We actually "feel" people. Being in their presence actually changes our state of mind and energy. With enough practice, not only was I able to fully "feel" these people in my dreams, I can now feel them while awake. Words can't describe the joy, acceptance and satisfaction this has brought into my life. It was this realization that made it clear to me that we are indeed energetic beings that are part of a greater consciousness.

Sorry for being long winded and going off on so many tangents, but dream mastery can be such a powerful means of positive transformation that I thought it worth it. If you have any more questions feel free to respond in this thread or PM me. I wish you well in this worthy endeavor.
Thanks. I think I'm beginning to make some slow progress. Last night, I had a dream that I was at an old high school acquaintance's new home on the beach (this was a manifestation by me as I have not had contact with this person in over 10 years) and she was still living with her mother in spite of the fact that we were both over 30. I looked at my hands in the dream and became aware that I was actually in a dream but became too excited once this realization hit and woke up. I couldn't do it in the subsequent dream I had after drifting back up. I will take your warnings to heart. No need to apologize for being long winded. Posts like that and @IcyPatriot's are the reason I created this thread.
 

KontradictioN

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@Galeb another question: as a matured man in his 30's, do you think I'm better equipped to handle the power trip (should I get a handle on this) than you were in your early 20's?
 

Galeb

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@Galeb another question: as a matured man in his 30's, do you think I'm better equipped to handle the power trip (should I get a handle on this) than you were in your early 20's?
Probably, but only you know if you can handle it. You're certainly a heck of a lot more mature than I was when I was in my early 30s never mind early 20s. I think awareness of the potential downfalls and the intent as a means to expand consciousness than to simply live out fantasies should be enough. That isn't to say you should never indulge in such fantasies. Like anything else, it is how you use it. If you drink or smoke as an escape, it can have harmful effects. If you drink or smoke because it's simply something you desire to do at the time, it can have positive effects. Intent is powerful, but moderation is also recommended.

Speaking of drinking an smoking, both sabotage dream recall. In fact, they completely disrupt the first cycle of the stages of sleep which takes a huge toll on converting short term memories to long term ones. If abstinence is out of the question, try to not smoke or drink for several hours before bed.
 

KontradictioN

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Probably, but only you know if you can handle it. You're certainly a heck of a lot more mature than I was when I was in my early 30s never mind early 20s. I think awareness of the potential downfalls and the intent as a means to expand consciousness than to simply live out fantasies should be enough. That isn't to say you should never indulge in such fantasies. Like anything else, it is how you use it. If you drink or smoke as an escape, it can have harmful effects. If you drink or smoke because it's simply something you desire to do at the time, it can have positive effects. Intent is powerful, but moderation is also recommended.

Speaking of drinking an smoking, both sabotage dream recall. In fact, they completely disrupt the first cycle of the stages of sleep which takes a huge toll on converting short term memories to long term ones. If abstinence is out of the question, try to not smoke or drink for several hours before bed.
I don't smoke anymore and aside from a glass of Jameson here and there during the week, I mostly limit my binge drinking to 1-2 days on the weekend. I'm mostly interested in it to better experience and deal with the full array of emotions one feels on top of expanding my abilities in real life work and social situations. "Living" out certain fantasies comes in second.
 

Galeb

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@KontradictioN Thanks for bringing this up. It has inspired a greater attention and dedication to exploring my dream world which has led to profound growth. You have my gratitude.

The cough suppressant I've been taking the last week is seriously affecting the nature of my dreams. Although my dream recall is only slightly affected, it has become a challenge to become lucid. In addition, the tone and feel of my dreams is profoundly different.

A few nights ago, during a particularly bizarre dream, lucidity came. For the first time in a long time, I decided to indulge, but in a deeper, more conscious way than before. Instead of simply manifesting a beautiful, engaging, receptive woman, I imagined a goddess. The being that emerged was so beautiful and projected a love so powerful, that I panicked and immediately began to wake.

Looking at my hands did nothing and in seconds I found myself at home in bed. Still recovering from such a powerful experience, it took me a bit to question whether I was still dreaming and looked at the clock to see if the display was messed up. The screen was blank, and after realizing that the fan was off, I figured the power must be out. After a quick check of whether what was occurring was consistent with the real world I assumed I was awake. That assumption was wrong, a humble reminder that the ego serves consciousness, not vice versa.

The dream that ensued made clear and dispelled a number of limiting beliefs, leading to a profound state of relaxation and clarity. Even though sick, ever since, I’ve been waking up feeling refreshed, energetic, light and peaceful. It seems fitting that such a positive and profound transformation manifested as a result of the inspiration from this thread and “unwelcome” side effects of a cough suppressant. Thanks again for bringing this up.
 
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KontradictioN

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@KontradictioN Thanks for bringing this up. It has inspired a greater attention and dedication to exploring my dream world which has led to profound growth. You have my gratitude.

The cough suppressant I've been taking the last week is seriously affecting the nature of my dreams. Although my dream recall is only slightly affected, it has become a challenge to become lucid. In addition, the tone and feel of my dreams is profoundly different.

A few nights ago, during a particularly bizarre dream, lucidity came. For the first time in a long time, I decided to indulge, but in a deeper, more conscious way than before. Instead of simply manifesting a beautiful, engaging, receptive woman, I imagined a goddess. The being that emerged was so beautiful and projected a love so powerful, that I panicked and immediately began to wake.

Looking at my hands did nothing and in seconds I found myself at home in bed. Still recovering from such a powerful experience, it took me a bit to question whether I was still dreaming and looked at the clock to see if the display was messed up. The screen was blank, and after realizing that the fan was off, I figured the power must be out. After a quick check of whether what was occurring was consistent with the real world I assumed I was awake. That assumption was wrong, a humble reminder that the ego serves consciousness, not vice versa.

The dream that ensued made clear and dispelled a number of limiting beliefs, leading to a profound state of relaxation and clarity. Even though sick, ever since, I’ve been waking up feeling refreshed, energetic, light and peaceful. It seems fitting that such a positive and profound transformation manifested as a result of the inspiration from this thread and “unwelcome” side effects of a cough suppressant. Thanks again for bringing this up.

No problem, man. Glad I could help. I'm still struggling with being able to do it regularly but I have been able to do it more often than I did before. What I'm still struggling with is the excitement that comes once it happens and I tend to wake up more often than not. But I'm beginning to get the hang of it... slowly but surely.
 

Nikolai

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I've actually been following this thread and I've been working on it as well. Like Kontra, I find myself waking up a lot so I'm not as well rested. But the biggest side effect for me during the course of the day (other than fatigue from interrupted sleeping) is that I'm a lot more calm and circumspect. I don't really get nearly as anxious about problems, say, at work than I did before. I'm keeping an eye on this to see how it all plays out.
 

KontradictioN

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I've actually been following this thread and I've been working on it as well. Like Kontra, I find myself waking up a lot so I'm not as well rested. But the biggest side effect for me during the course of the day (other than fatigue from interrupted sleeping) is that I'm a lot more calm and circumspect. I don't really get nearly as anxious about problems, say, at work than I did before. I'm keeping an eye on this to see how it all plays out.

Can't you see what he was talking about, though? It's almost kind of an addictive feeling when you make it happen. I, too, am waking up more well rested and less stressed. I'm continuing to work on it but I'm still struggling with the excitement of realizing that I nailed it and waking up far too often.
 

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When I was younger I could almost control my dreams by "day dreaming" thinking out a whole story while waiting to go to sleep....
In old age I hardly ever dream, if now and then I do have a dream it's just dream crap....
Pretty girls running through a field of Wild Raspberry Bushes.
 

IcyPatriot

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I was lucid dreaming as a child ... of course I had no clue what I was doing all I know is that several times a week it just happened. My favorite ones were I was flying ... and it was always in my neighborhood and I would use the opportunity to fly to wherever I was not allowed to ride my bike. Some of my dreams really confused me ... I would see a dead relative in my dreams and I would ask them to play catch or something like that and there were times where I woke up and their ghost was right there in the room. I was an avid sleep walker and talker and i later learned that some of those lucid dreams could have been disasterous - lucid dream + sleep walking not a great combination.

One time when I was 7 my father appeared in my dream ... or I thought it was my father. He started speaking to me about school and the next thing I know I woke up and I saw my dad standing in the hallway outside my room. I spoke to him ... no answer ... again ... and again ... so I got up and approached him and went to hug him but my arms went though him. I did this several more times the same thing and I spoke to him but he did not speak back as he did in my dream. So I woke up in the morning and asked my dad about it and he was confused as to my questioning. I later found out my dad was a twin and his twin was still born. So now I know I saw a ghost of his twin and I was scared **** ... slept under the covers for s few weeks after that. I think the ghost appeared as the same age as my dad so as not to scare me ... but I was a kid and of course I was scared.

That same man appeared in my dreams a few more times - we played catch and he would ask me if I wanted to meet other people and I said okay but I was a kid and really had no clue about this stuff. Also he would appear as a ghost every time I moved where I lived but when I got up to approach him he would disappear by running away through the wall. Anyways ... as i got older I became more and more able to control my dreams and I really enjoyed it. People I never met would come and talk to me like they knew me ... I honestly felt I was in some other dimension but again I was a teenager and still didn't understand any of it other than I knew how to do it if it happened - I never knew how to get there. I got a few dream books at the library but there was no internet to really learn about it and the dream books did not help. Had I got a lucid dream book I may have learned but i did not know the term lucid.

Several times I met a pretty girl and my dreams and I figured hey I am going to go for it ... I'm dreaming this is great. Well I half woke up paralyzed ... could not wake up but could not move and I was being humped by some heavy entity on my body. I think I somehow hooked up with a spirit and I crossed over and they crossed over and they took advantage of me. Several times a few held me down and they took turns ... It was really quite scary and after that for a while whenever I got to a lucid dream I would more or less become passive and not control it and it morphed to a normal type weird dream.

It's not always a great thing ... sometimes the dream is quite utopian and I've had bouts of depression after experiencing the same lucid dream too many times in a row. I cannot do it anymore without the Melatonin ... probably because I am older and i do not pass through the stages of sleep normally as i did when younger. Sleep apnea, sleep disturbances get in the way. So if your older than 40 or 50 ... .you really have to make your sleep situation perfect to do the lucid dreaming. Like I sleep with my eyes open so I have to make sure the room is completely dark now or I see spirits and they wake me up ... I've had enough ghosts in my lifetime I've had it with them. My wife has woken up to me standing in the room holding a conversation with a dead relative ... it's really scary stuff the lucid dreaming. But once in a while it's a utopian situation - golfing, bike riding, playing hockey and i must say it's the best because when it happens I am always a young man in my 20's. But no more trying to have sex ... like I said I've had it with ghosts and spirits.:D
 
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Galeb

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After recent trials, a few days without cough medicine has incited a renaissance of sorts. Waking with a profound sense of calm with 168 bpm is a strange thing. The potential of the dreamworld was only touched upon in this thread. Take seriously the warnings given.

Tread carefully when consciously confronting your deepest fears while dreaming. Tread ever more carefully when confronting your own passion. Although the growth I have experienced as a result is clearly worth it IMO, the experience has been traumatic to say the least. Seriously, tread carefully, cuz you're not going to like some of the things you find. I won't get too specific, but will share some techniques that yielded powerful results.

1. While lucid, give forms to different aspects of your personality and different facets of your mind (I.E. the ID, Ego and Superego, the inner child, the shadow or even the judge and victim cited in the 4 agreements. Even emotions like envy etc... can be given form. Anything that you identify within you can manifest in form. The most useful tool I have created is a Tardis for the part of the mind that creates external experience. You can literally open a door to a new universe without effort.

2. Instead of just setting an intent when you fall asleep, set an intent while lucid. You can even manifest different aspects of personality, spiritual guides, including the setting, to start the dream and then just be present as it evolves on it's own.

3. Give physical form to spirit guides. If they don't come on their own, I can attest that they can be manifested intentionally.

4. Realize that dreaming is a partnership between the conscious and the unconscious. If a specific form isn't working for you, create a different one until it works.

5. Use ideals like fairness, justice, heaven, nirvana, hell and kindness as intentions while you're lucid. You'll be amazed at what can manifest. Ideals such as god, goddess or devil can be particularly traumatic.

6. This may sound cliche, but create a "happy place". It can prove invaluable to recover from some of the scary stuff that can happen.

7. Confront fears. Set a vague intent on an "unknown" fear. The unconscious is not shy. Such things can be terrifying. As painful as it can be, the liberation of fear can be ecstatic.

8. More importantly, set a vague intent on what makes you a happy. The answers your unconscious provides may prove shocking.

9. Such experiences will expand your consciousness. Keep your mind open. A closed mind inhibits growth.

10. Try to set goals into motion and be passive as the dream transforms. It may give insight into achieving a goal, but it can also show when a goal doesn't align with what you really want.

11. When one repeatedly feels the need to flee from their own ideal of beauty and love, there is clearly **** that needs to be resolved.

12. As the power of intent becomes more clear, you life will change dramatically, very quickly.

Use caution in exploring the drealm world. The only difference between experiences in the dream world and the real world is that real world experiences are bound to a persistent co created reality. There is legitimate pain in consciously exploring such things, but the potential rewards are beyond imagination.

Thank you so much, @KontradictioN. Your input has manifested in great, positive transformation in another. You have my sincere appreciation.

edit. Perhaps most importantly, work on your grounding. Such rapid intense realizations can create a severe disconnect with "reality". Stay ****ing grounded!
 
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Galeb

Experienced Starter w/First Big Contract
Everyones' truth is different and everchanging. If you do not welcome change, please do not engage in such exploration.
 

Galeb

Experienced Starter w/First Big Contract
I was lucid dreaming as a child ... of course I had no clue what I was doing all I know is that several times a week it just happened. My favorite ones were I was flying ... and it was always in my neighborhood and I would use the opportunity to fly to wherever I was not allowed to ride my bike. Some of my dreams really confused me ... I would see a dead relative in my dreams and I would ask them to play catch or something like that and there were times where I woke up and their ghost was right there in the room. I was an avid sleep walker and talker and i later learned that some of those lucid dreams could have been disasterous - lucid dream + sleep walking not a great combination.

One time when I was 7 my father appeared in my dream ... or I thought it was my father. He started speaking to me about school and the next thing I know I woke up and I saw my dad standing in the hallway outside my room. I spoke to him ... no answer ... again ... and again ... so I got up and approached him and went to hug him but my arms went though him. I did this several more times the same thing and I spoke to him but he did not speak back as he did in my dream. So I woke up in the morning and asked my dad about it and he was confused as to my questioning. I later found out my dad was a twin and his twin was still born. So now I know I saw a ghost of his twin and I was scared **** ... slept under the covers for s few weeks after that. I think the ghost appeared as the same age as my dad so as not to scare me ... but I was a kid and of course I was scared.

That same man appeared in my dreams a few more times - we played catch and he would ask me if I wanted to meet other people and I said okay but I was a kid and really had no clue about this stuff. Also he would appear as a ghost every time I moved where I lived but when I got up to approach him he would disappear by running away through the wall. Anyways ... as i got older I became more and more able to control my dreams and I really enjoyed it. People I never met would come and talk to me like they knew me ... I honestly felt I was in some other dimension but again I was a teenager and still didn't understand any of it other than I knew how to do it if it happened - I never knew how to get there. I got a few dream books at the library but there was no internet to really learn about it and the dream books did not help. Had I got a lucid dream book I may have learned but i did not know the term lucid.

Several times I met a pretty girl and my dreams and I figured hey I am going to go for it ... I'm dreaming this is great. Well I half woke up paralyzed ... could not wake up but could not move and I was being humped by some heavy entity on my body. I think I somehow hooked up with a spirit and I crossed over and they crossed over and they took advantage of me. Several times a few held me down and they took turns ... It was really quite scary and after that for a while whenever I got to a lucid dream I would more or less become passive and not control it and it morphed to a normal type weird dream.

It's not always a great thing ... sometimes the dream is quite utopian and I've had bouts of depression after experiencing the same lucid dream too many times in a row. I cannot do it anymore without the Melatonin ... probably because I am older and i do not pass through the stages of sleep normally as i did when younger. Sleep apnea, sleep disturbances get in the way. So if your older than 40 or 50 ... .you really have to make your sleep situation perfect to do the lucid dreaming. Like I sleep with my eyes open so I have to make sure the room is completely dark now or I see spirits and they wake me up ... I've had enough ghosts in my lifetime I've had it with them. My wife has woken up to me standing in the room holding a conversation with a dead relative ... it's really scary stuff the lucid dreaming. But once in a while it's a utopian situation - golfing, bike riding, playing hockey and i must say it's the best because when it happens I am always a young man in my 20's. But no more trying to have sex ... like I said I've had it with ghosts and spirits.:D
Thank you for sharing. Dream experiences can be infinitely personal.

Some of what you are speaking of may not be lucid dreaming but channeling or even hallucinations. Such things can be related, but not necessarily. Without deep exploration, do not assume that such entities are external. They may be manifestations of your own consciousness.

I recommend reading everything written by Carl Jung and his disciples. That said, and Jung would agree, anything in the dream is 100% personal and may not align with defined archetypes. Intuition, trust acceptance and many other "spiritual tools" can assist in positive resolution of such experiences.

I recommend using serious exploration of dreams as part of a larger spiritual practice. When confronting the nature of one's deepest beliefs, things can get uncomfortable fast.
 
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