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August 5 in Pats History: He Died in the Line of Duty

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Dec 6th

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jmt57

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Staff member
Today in Patriots History
'In The Line of Duty'


In memory of Larry Carwell, who would have been 77 today
Born August 5, 1944 in Vada, Georgia
Patriot CB, 1969-1972; uniform #41
Acquired in a seven player trade with the Oilers on March 24, 1969
Died January 9, 1984 at the age of 39

Larry Carwell was a third round draft pick by the Oilers in 1967, out of Iowa State. After two seasons there he was part of a blockbuster trade between Boston and Houston. Two months after the 'common' (combined AFL and NFL) 1969 draft, the Oilers sent Carwell, RB Sid Blanks, MLB Ron Caveness and Charley Frazier to the Patriots in exchange for CB Leroy Mitchell and the Pats second round draft pick in 1970. Mitchell was an All-Star with seven interceptions the previous year, and just 24 years old.

The Patriots of that time were rebuilding and in need of upgrades everywhere. In 1966 they seemed destined to win the AFL East and possibly represent the American Football League in the first super bowl. But the Pats were upset on the final game of the season and the entire roster seemed to age and get slow at the same time, resulting in back-to-back ten-loss seasons. Boston was willing to give up a high draft pick and a budding star for four
players, but the plan did not work out. Blanks was an all star as a rookie, but had done next to nothing since then; he rarely saw any action behind Jim Nance and Carl Garrett. Frazier did score seven touchdowns in '69, but he was over the hill and had only nine receptions the following year. (If you are rebuilding aren't you trying to get younger, not older?) Caveness never played a single down for the Pats.

Larry Carwell was the only one of the four that made the trade worthwhile. He was a four-year starter for the Patriots at left corner, from '69-'72 in a period of time when there was not much support from either the pass rush or from the offense. Carwell had ten interceptions (with one touchdown) for the Pats, and also contributed on special teams with 13 punt returns and two kickoff returns.


Remembering Larry Carwell
Larry Carwell was an exceptional Iowa State football player from 1964-66. He was also a huge success as a professional, playing six seasons (1967-72) in the AFL for the Houston Oilers and New England Patriots, collecting 14 career interceptions along the way.​
A native of Campbell, Ohio, Carwell lettered three years at Iowa State as an outstanding defensive back. He tallied 127 tackles and picked off seven passes in his career. On Oct. 8, 1966, Carwell picked off two Kansas passes and returned the interceptions for 123 return yards. His interception return yardage that day is still a Cyclone school record.​
Carwell started over 50 games in the AFL during his distinguished professional career. He had five interceptions for the Patriots in 1971 and returned two interceptions for touchdowns in his career.​
Unlike today’s professional athletes, players in the 1970s were underpaid. They needed a second career to survive, and Carwell was determined and ready for another challenge.​




Carwell entered the United States Drug Enforcement Administration in 1974 shortly after retiring from the pros. He soon became a special agent for the DEA, and on Jan. 9, 1984, Carwell, along with four Air Force servicemen, died in a helicopter crash during an anti-narcotics mission.​
Larry Carwell was stationed in Houston with the United States Department of Justice Drug Enforcement Administration’s Houston Field Division soon after becoming a special agent. He was a Sunday school teacher for a local Baptist church and active in drug prevention and sports programs in the community.​
Carwell was sent to Miami with the task of stopping drug runners in the Bahamas. During the 1980s, cocaine smuggling was at its peak and the Bahamas was a key link in the smuggling chain.​
Just off the coast of the Bahamas, his helicopter developed complications. The aircraft suffered from a dual engine flame out and crashed into the sea. All five bodies were never found.​
Carwell was 39 years old.​


 

Zuma

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Today in Patriots History
'In The Line of Duty'


In memory of Larry Carwell, who would have been 77 today
Born August 5, 1944 in Vada, Georgia
Patriot CB, 1969-1972; uniform #41
Acquired in a seven player trade with the Oilers on March 24, 1969
Died January 9, 1984 at the age of 39

Larry Carwell was a third round draft pick by the Oilers in 1967, out of Iowa State. After two seasons there he was part of a blockbuster trade between Boston and Houston. Two months after the 'common' (combined AFL and NFL) 1969 draft, the Oilers sent Carwell, RB Sid Blanks, MLB Ron Caveness and Charley Frazier to the Patriots in exchange for CB Leroy Mitchell and the Pats second round draft pick in 1970. Mitchell was an All-Star with seven interceptions the previous year, and just 24 years old.

The Patriots of that time were rebuilding and in need of upgrades everywhere. In 1966 they seemed destined to win the AFL East and possibly represent the American Football League in the first super bowl. But the Pats were upset on the final game of the season and the entire roster seemed to age and get slow at the same time, resulting in back-to-back ten-loss seasons. Boston was willing to give up a high draft pick and a budding star for four
players, but the plan did not work out. Blanks was an all star as a rookie, but had done next to nothing since then; he rarely saw any action behind Jim Nance and Carl Garrett. Frazier did score seven touchdowns in '69, but he was over the hill and had only nine receptions the following year. (If you are rebuilding aren't you trying to get younger, not older?) Caveness never played a single down for the Pats.

Larry Carwell was the only one of the four that made the trade worthwhile. He was a four-year starter for the Patriots at left corner, from '69-'72 in a period of time when there was not much support from either the pass rush or from the offense. Carwell had ten interceptions (with one touchdown) for the Pats, and also contributed on special teams with 13 punt returns and two kickoff returns.


Remembering Larry Carwell
Larry Carwell was an exceptional Iowa State football player from 1964-66. He was also a huge success as a professional, playing six seasons (1967-72) in the AFL for the Houston Oilers and New England Patriots, collecting 14 career interceptions along the way.​
A native of Campbell, Ohio, Carwell lettered three years at Iowa State as an outstanding defensive back. He tallied 127 tackles and picked off seven passes in his career. On Oct. 8, 1966, Carwell picked off two Kansas passes and returned the interceptions for 123 return yards. His interception return yardage that day is still a Cyclone school record.​
Carwell started over 50 games in the AFL during his distinguished professional career. He had five interceptions for the Patriots in 1971 and returned two interceptions for touchdowns in his career.​
Unlike today’s professional athletes, players in the 1970s were underpaid. They needed a second career to survive, and Carwell was determined and ready for another challenge.​




Carwell entered the United States Drug Enforcement Administration in 1974 shortly after retiring from the pros. He soon became a special agent for the DEA, and on Jan. 9, 1984, Carwell, along with four Air Force servicemen, died in a helicopter crash during an anti-narcotics mission.​
Larry Carwell was stationed in Houston with the United States Department of Justice Drug Enforcement Administration’s Houston Field Division soon after becoming a special agent. He was a Sunday school teacher for a local Baptist church and active in drug prevention and sports programs in the community.​
Carwell was sent to Miami with the task of stopping drug runners in the Bahamas. During the 1980s, cocaine smuggling was at its peak and the Bahamas was a key link in the smuggling chain.​
Just off the coast of the Bahamas, his helicopter developed complications. The aircraft suffered from a dual engine flame out and crashed into the sea. All five bodies were never found.​
Carwell was 39 years old.​


Geez…didn’t know this. RIP
 

p8ryts

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Today in Patriots History
'In The Line of Duty'


In memory of Larry Carwell, who would have been 77 today
Born August 5, 1944 in Vada, Georgia
Patriot CB, 1969-1972; uniform #41
Acquired in a seven player trade with the Oilers on March 24, 1969
Died January 9, 1984 at the age of 39

Larry Carwell was a third round draft pick by the Oilers in 1967, out of Iowa State. After two seasons there he was part of a blockbuster trade between Boston and Houston. Two months after the 'common' (combined AFL and NFL) 1969 draft, the Oilers sent Carwell, RB Sid Blanks, MLB Ron Caveness and Charley Frazier to the Patriots in exchange for CB Leroy Mitchell and the Pats second round draft pick in 1970. Mitchell was an All-Star with seven interceptions the previous year, and just 24 years old.

The Patriots of that time were rebuilding and in need of upgrades everywhere. In 1966 they seemed destined to win the AFL East and possibly represent the American Football League in the first super bowl. But the Pats were upset on the final game of the season and the entire roster seemed to age and get slow at the same time, resulting in back-to-back ten-loss seasons. Boston was willing to give up a high draft pick and a budding star for four
players, but the plan did not work out. Blanks was an all star as a rookie, but had done next to nothing since then; he rarely saw any action behind Jim Nance and Carl Garrett. Frazier did score seven touchdowns in '69, but he was over the hill and had only nine receptions the following year. (If you are rebuilding aren't you trying to get younger, not older?) Caveness never played a single down for the Pats.

Larry Carwell was the only one of the four that made the trade worthwhile. He was a four-year starter for the Patriots at left corner, from '69-'72 in a period of time when there was not much support from either the pass rush or from the offense. Carwell had ten interceptions (with one touchdown) for the Pats, and also contributed on special teams with 13 punt returns and two kickoff returns.


Remembering Larry Carwell
Larry Carwell was an exceptional Iowa State football player from 1964-66. He was also a huge success as a professional, playing six seasons (1967-72) in the AFL for the Houston Oilers and New England Patriots, collecting 14 career interceptions along the way.​
A native of Campbell, Ohio, Carwell lettered three years at Iowa State as an outstanding defensive back. He tallied 127 tackles and picked off seven passes in his career. On Oct. 8, 1966, Carwell picked off two Kansas passes and returned the interceptions for 123 return yards. His interception return yardage that day is still a Cyclone school record.​
Carwell started over 50 games in the AFL during his distinguished professional career. He had five interceptions for the Patriots in 1971 and returned two interceptions for touchdowns in his career.​
Unlike today’s professional athletes, players in the 1970s were underpaid. They needed a second career to survive, and Carwell was determined and ready for another challenge.​




Carwell entered the United States Drug Enforcement Administration in 1974 shortly after retiring from the pros. He soon became a special agent for the DEA, and on Jan. 9, 1984, Carwell, along with four Air Force servicemen, died in a helicopter crash during an anti-narcotics mission.​
Larry Carwell was stationed in Houston with the United States Department of Justice Drug Enforcement Administration’s Houston Field Division soon after becoming a special agent. He was a Sunday school teacher for a local Baptist church and active in drug prevention and sports programs in the community.​
Carwell was sent to Miami with the task of stopping drug runners in the Bahamas. During the 1980s, cocaine smuggling was at its peak and the Bahamas was a key link in the smuggling chain.​
Just off the coast of the Bahamas, his helicopter developed complications. The aircraft suffered from a dual engine flame out and crashed into the sea. All five bodies were never found.​
Carwell was 39 years old.​


Didn't know that. Good story, always liked him as a player.
 

jmt57

Moderator
Staff member
Today in Patriots History
More August 5th Birthdays


Happy 57th birthday to William Roberts
Born August 5, 1962 in Miami
Patriot LG, 1995-1996; uniform #76
Signed as a free agent on July 24, 1995


William Roberts was a late first round draft pick from Ohio State in 1984, playing for the Giants until 1994. During his first few years in the NFL he manned both offensive tackle positions, then from 1989 on he played left guard. As an LG he was named to the Pro Bowl in 1990.

Roberts was a two-year starter with the Pats, one of many former G-Men recruited by Bill Parcells while in the twilight of their careers. He even followed the Big Tuna back to Jersey for his final NFL season with the Jets in '97 - which makes him a guy who played 195 NFL games, for three different teams - and only one head coach. I'm guessing he is the only person to perform that feat.

In the 1996 season he started all 19 games for the Pats, culminating in their Super Bowl 31 loss to Green Bay. That was Roberts' third trip to the Super Bowl. He had previously won his first ring when the Giants defeated Denver 39-20 in Super Bowl 21. This came just one season after the Bears demolished New England in the super bowl, and were still a formidable opponent. New York and Chicago both finished the season with records of 14-2. But in the divisional round game Washington upset the Bears 27-13, shutting Chicago out 20-0 in the second half while limiting Doug Flutie to an 11-31, 134 yards, 1 TD, 2 Int game. The following day the Giants annihilated San Francisco 49-3 in the early game, and then Denver came from behind to defeat the Pats 22-17. The New England defense did its part by limiting John Elway to a 13-32 day with two picks, but Tony Eason - who did throw a 19 and 45 yard touchdown passes to Stanley Morgan - was sacked six times, including one for a fourth quarter safety.



Dec 16, 1995 in Pittsburgh: William Roberts in action protecting Drew Bledsoe's blind side.



Dec 1, 1996 in San Diego: Robert Kraft congratulates Larry Whigham after the Pats 45-7 victory over the Chargers. Curtis Martin and William Roberts precede Whigham.



Jan 12, 1997 at Foxboro Stadium: Fans congratulate William Roberts after the Pats 20-6 AFCCG victory over Jacksonville



Jan 26, 1997 in New Orleans: William Roberts stares at the jumbotron in disbelief during Super Bowl 31.





Happy 43rd birthday to Will Allen
Born August 5, 1978 in Syracuse
Patriot CB, 2012; uniform #26
Signed as a free agent on March 21, 2012

Will Allen was another former Giant, also selected in the first round. New York tabbed the corner from Syracuse as their 22nd overall pick of the 2001 draft. Allen spent five seasons with the Giants and five more in Miami before a final training camp in Foxboro. The Patriots placed Allen on injured reserve on August 27, 2012, 13 days prior to their week one kickoff. He spent the full season on IR and never played for the Pats.

To make matters a bit confusing for football fans there was another Will Allen who was also a defensive back, whose career overlapped (2004-2015) that of our Will Allen (2001-2012). The other Will Allen played for the Bucs, Steelers and Cowboys.


Aug 28, 2012:
Allen, who came off the field after warm-ups in Wednesday and Thursday practices in Tampa, didn't play Friday night against the Buccaneers.​
Usually when a player is placed on injured reserve, that means they are lost for the season.​
But in this case, the option is there for the team to work out injury settlements with all three players at any time. If the injury settlement is worked out within five days of them being placed on injured reserve, the option opens for that player to potentially return to the team later in the season.​
A negotiated injury settlement would be for a specific number of games. The team could then approach the players about returning six games after the number of games settled upon.​



Mar 1, 2017:
Prosecutors said Allen and Daub ran a Massachusetts company, Capital Financial Partners, that took in more than $35 million from investors between 2012 and 2015, supposedly to loan money and then earn money on the interest.​
Some of the loans the duo claimed to issue never existed, authorities said, and in other instances, Allen and Daub exaggerated the size of the loans they made. They used new investments to repay existing investors, claiming the money was coming from loan payments.​



Mar 1, 2017:
Will Allen was sentenced to six years in prison and three years of supervised release as well as ordered to pay $16.8 million in restitution by a federal judge on Wednesday for his role in a multimillion-dollar Ponzi scheme.​
Co-defendant Susan Daub received the same sanctions when U.S. District Court Judge William G. Young announced the sentence in Boston. Allen, 38, and Daub, 56, pleaded guilty in November to two counts of wire fraud, one count of conspiracy and one count of money laundering as part of a $35 million fraudulent loan scheme targeted at professional athletes.​
“The sentences imposed by the court today send a strong message – those who defraud investors to unjustly enrich themselves will pay a hefty price,” Special Agent in Charge of IRS Criminal Investigation Joel P. Garland said in a statement “As a former professional football player, Mr. Allen’s conduct is especially egregious. He used his status as an NFL athlete to legitimize his dealings with investors. We are proud to bring our financial expertise to joint investigations of this magnitude, and help prevent future victims of such schemes.”​
“The defendants’ elaborate Ponzi scheme robbed many of the investors of a stable financial future,” Acting United States Attorney William D. Weinreb said in a statement. “The significant sentences the court imposed today should remind investment professionals to handle their clients’ money with the transparency and integrity that the law requires.”​




Other pro football players born on August 5 with New England connections:

Freddie Scott, 69 (8/5/52); Amherst
Wide receiver played in the NFL for ten years, with the Colts and Lions from 1974 to 1983.

Ernie McCann (1902-1971); Hartford Blues
Tackle, end and guard from Penn State played in the NFL back in the twenties.

Sky August (1904-1993); Providence Steam Roller
Presumably known for his ability to jump high, this tailback and wingback from Villanova was in the NFL for one season, 1931.

Dwight Bingham, 60 (8/5/61); grew up in Stamford CT
Jamaican born defensive end was one of the replacement players in 1987, for Atlanta.




Some of the other pro football players born on this date include:

Roman Gabriel, 81 (8/5/40)
Four-time Pro Bowl quarterback; from 1967-69 his Rams went 32-7-3, but were never able to win the NFL championship.

Bruce Coslet, 75 (8/5/46)
After seven seasons as a tight end, Coslet was a head coach for 16 years with the Jets and Bengals.

C.J. Spiller, 34 (8/5/87)
Averaged 5.2 yards per rush in 2011 with the Bills, then followed that up with 6.0 ypc the next season, gaining 1,703 yards from scrimmage.

Wendell Hayes (1940-2019)
The fullback scored 35 touchdowns from 1963-74, winning a ring in Super Bowl 4 with the Chiefs.

Howie Ferguson (1930-2005)
Pro Bowl fullback for the Packers in the fifties.

Gary Beban, 75 (8/5/46)
Beban is the answer to the trivia question, 'what UCLA quarterback won the 1967 Heisman Trophy over OJ Simpson'?
 

jmt57

Moderator
Staff member
Today in Patriots History
August 5th Transactions


August 5, 1961:
The Patriots release three players: Bob Knight, Bob Lasch and Larry Lavery, none of whom ever played in the AFL or NFL.

A search for Knight was fruitless since he shares the same name as the legendary basketball coach, and nothing came up for Bob Lasch either. As for Lavery, it turns out that he was a lineman at Illinois who was drafted by Philadelphia in the 17th round of the 1961 draft, 238th overall. Although undrafted by the AFL he chose instead to sign with the Boston Patriots.

At some point very early in training camp Lavery suffered an injury that caused his pro football career to end before it even began, and he was released by the Pats on August 5th. Larry returned to Illinois where he wound up the 1961 season as football coach at Galena High School and in 1962 posted a 9-1 mark at Freeport Acquin.

A few years later Lavery became the head football coach at Peoria Central, a position he remained in for 27 seasons. While there he won more games (he finished with a 176-109-2 record) than any coach in the history of the school, before retiring following the 1998 season.

Greater Peoria Sports Hall of Fame | Larry Lavery


August 5, 1963:
Patriots trade Dick Klein to Oakland for the rights to Jim Leo, and cash considerations.

Klein was an AFL All-Star at defensive tackle in 1962, and had played in 26 of a possible 28 games over the previous two seasons, with 22 starts. Leo was a defensive end for the Giants and Vikings from 1960-62, who never did play for the Patriots.

More on Richard 'Sleepy' Klein here:

 

jmt57

Moderator
Staff member
Didn't know that. Good story, always liked him as a player.
Yeah, it was a long time ago but I definitely remember liking him as a player as well.

I had no idea about his post-football career or death until I started doing these daily trivia posts. Cool yet sad story.
 

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