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August 11 in Pats History: Daryl Johnson

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jmt57

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Today in Patriots History
Daryl Johnson


Happy 75th birthday to Daryl Johnson
Born August 11, 1946 in Richmond, Virginia
Patriot CB, 1968-1970; uniform #23
Pats 8th round (197th overall) selection of the 1968 draft, from Morgan State

Daryl Johnson started all 42 games for the Patriots in his first three years with the Pats. He had five interceptions, two fumble recoveries, one touchdown and one safety. However he missed the entire 1971 season on injured reserve due to a severely broken ankle, and was never quite the same after that. Although his playing time in New England was short, it was impactful enough that Johnson is a member of the Patriots All-Decade Team of the 1960s, in a defensive backfield with CB Chuck Shonta and safeties Ron Hall and Don Webb.

Johnson was waived on September 5, 1972 and claimed by Cincinnati. He re-signed with the Patriots in February of 1973, but was waived again at the start of training camp, on July 31, 1973. After another year of rehabbing the ankle, Johnson spent two years in the World Football League. He played for the Houston Texans in '74 and the Shreveport Steamer when the franchise moved in '75. Among Johnson's teammates were several other former Patriots: RB Jim Nance, QB Mike Taliaferro, QB Don Trull, DB Art McMahon, and former AFL all-stars Don Maynard and Willie Frazier.

Johnson went through all of high school and college with the teams he played on never losing a single game.


From the 1971 New England Patriots Media Guide, when Johnson was still just 24 years old:
One of pro football's most promising young cornerbacks . . . allowed only one reception in team's first five games last season . . . has been a starter since his '68 rookie year . . . often rhymes a prediction on how he feels he will fare in a given game . . . one of Pats' most colorful performers . . . exceptional jumping ability . . . strong on sweeps run in his direction . . . beginning his fourth season . . . quarterbacked Morgan State as a senior . . . has previously been running back, receiver, defensive back in college . . . Morgan never lost a game in Daryl's three varsity seasons . . . his high school, Maggie Walker High of Richmond, Virginia also never lost when Morgan played there . . . when drafted he was tabbed one of the most underrated selections in the draft . . . now an off-season Ivy Clothing Shoppe executive in Belmont . . . also hosts a radio talk show . . . seldom at a loss for words.​


Some more, from the 1972 Media Guide:
Coming back after a year's absence due to ankle injury . . . rated as extremely promising cornerback . . . was starter since his rookie year of '68 when he was eighth round draft choice . . . very strong versus running game . . . challenges all receivers . All-everything at Morgan State where he played quarterback and defensive back . . . team never lost in his three years . . . NCAA small college player of the year . . . threw five TD passes in a game three times.​



Daryl Johnson was a quarterback in college; here he is handing off in a 1966 game for Morgan State


Daryl E. Johnson is a native of Richmond, Virginia and graduated from Maggie L. Walker High School. He entered Morgan State University in 1964 and received his Bachelor of Science in Business Administration degree. Mr. Johnson was a four year letterman in football playing on three undefeated Central Intercollegiate Athletic Association (CIAA) Championship Football teams from 1965-1967, and was a two-year letterman in track and field.​

Mr. Johnson acquired many honors during his amazing football career; however, he carved his own piece of Morgan athletic history as the starting quarterback during the 1966 and 1967 CIAA Championship football seasons. In 1966, Morgan State University became the first predominantly African-American team selected to play in the Tangerine Bowl (now the Citrus Bowl). Mr. Johnson led the Morgan Bears on one of the biggest stages the University had been on to a historic 14-6 win over West Chester (Pa.) State. He ended the season being selected to the 1st Team Maryland All-State Team as a Place Kicker and 1st Team All-CIAA.​

During the 1967 season, Mr. Johnson led the Bears to their third consecutive CIAA Championship and undefeated seasons. He set a school record by becoming the first quarterback to pass for over 1,000 yards in single season, completing 54 percent of his passes for 1,050 yards. His senior year performance was so outstanding that he was selected 1st Team Maryland All-State Team as quarterback, 1st Team All-CIAA Quarterback and 1st Team Pittsburg Courier Black All-American Defensive Back. Mr. Johnson also received the prestigious Pigskin Club of Washington D.C. Award for NCAA Small College Player of the Year. Mr. Johnson finished his career leading Morgan to the longest winning streak in college football at the time, 26 games. The Morgan football team only lost one game during Mr. Johnson’s four year career.​

Mr. Johnson was drafted in the eighth-round in 1968 by the Boston Patriots and played from 1968-1971, becoming a starter in his rookie season. He was selected to the Patriots’ All-Star 1960-1969 Team by Patriots’ fans. Mr. Johnson also played in the World Football League with the Houston Texans/Shreveport Steamer teams.​

After his professional football career, Mr. Johnson achieved additional success in the corporate world as a stockbroker, small business owner and small business liaison. He currently resides in West Newbury, Massachusetts, where he is a self-employed sports consultant to professional, college and high school athletes and is a Master Mason of the Prince Hall Grand Lodge of Free & Accepted Masons of Massachusetts.​


January 9, 2015:
Sometimes, looking back, Daryl Johnson wonders if it truly happened. Did he really lead Morgan State's football team to two undefeated seasons and then play in the pros for the Patriots?​

"It's a life you dream about as a kid. Then, while you're living it, you can't believe it," said Johnson, 68, of Haverhill, Mass. "And now, while watching the Ravens play New England [Saturday], I'll be thinking, 'Was that actually me out there years ago?' "​

A 5-foot-10, 175-pound walk-on from Richmond, Va., Johnson played wide receiver and place kicker before moving to quarterback as a junior. Again the Bears went unbeaten, averaged 40 points and finished with a 14-6 victory over West Chester State (Pa.) in the Tangerine Bowl in Orlando. That game, in 1966, celebrated the first postseason win by a historically black college against a predominately white one.​

"Back then, black college teams were considered a little better than high school," Johnson said. "But we thought we could play with anyone in the country, so we sure weren't going to let them [West Chester] beat us." . . .​


Boston proved different. In Johnson's three years there, the Patriots won 10 of 42 games.​

"At Morgan, I remember looking across the field and wondering how it felt to be losing, 40-0," he said. "I found out, playing for Boston."​

Johnson tried to psyche up the Patriots. "I dyed my football shoes red, but the league wouldn't allow it," he said. And he shared poems with the media before each game, to wit:​

"With [Miami receiver Paul] Warfield out there, we'll be under the gun,

But I still think I'm going to hold him to one."

After football, Johnson worked in auto sales, as a stockbroker and as an insurance claims adjuster before retiring. Married 30 years, he has two children, one grandchild and an interest in latch hooking (wall hangings made of acrylic yarns). A kidney ailment requires dialysis three times a week.​

"I had about seven concussions in football, so I keep testing myself to see if I'm still sane," he said. "I come up with a 50-50 response because, honestly, you have to be crazy to play the game in the first place."​
 

jmt57

Moderator
Staff member
Today in Patriots History
A pair of local alums make the team


Happy 70th birthday to Steve Corbett
Born August 11, 1951 in Dover, New Hampshire
Patriot guard, 1974-1975; uniform #62
Pats 2nd round (30th overall) selection of the 1974 draft, from Boston College


From 1975: Steve Corbett (62) blocks for Mack Herron (42) as Jim Plunkett (16) looks on.

Steve Corbett was a local southeastern New Hampshire guy. He grew up in Dover and went to St Thomas Aquinas High School in his hometown, then Bridgton Academy in Maine for a postgraduate year.

May 17, 2010: Corbett held the line in Dover and beyond

After Bridgton, it was off to BC. Under coach Joe Yukica, Corbett distinguished himself as one of the nation's best offensive linemen. He battled a nagging neck injury during his time with the Eagles, but still performed well enough to be drafted by the Patriots as their top pick in 1974.​
"I had a pretty good career at BC," Corbett said. "A lot of nagging injuries, though. I had neck surgery twice before I joined the Patriots."​
He participated in the Pats' training camp in 1974, but sat out the entirety of what would have been his rookie season due to the surgery. He was back in 1975 and played all 14 games alongside such famous names as Jim Plunkett, Steve Grogan and Hall-of-Famer John Hannah.​
Unfortunately for Corbett, 1975 turned out to be his only season in the NFL.​
"It's hard to be an offensive lineman with a bad neck," Corbett said. "I tried to make a comeback in '79, but I couldn't do it."​




Happy 71st birthday to Joe Wilson
Born August 11, 1950 in Raeford, North Carolina
Patriot RB, 1974; uniform #23
Claimed off waivers from Cincinnati on September 11, 1974


Joe Wilson was another local guy: he graduated from Jamaica Plain High School before entering the College of the Holy Cross in Worcester. Wilson played in twelve games for the Pats in a backup role and on special teams. His stat line with the Patriots reads 15 rushes for 57 yards (3.8 ypc), three receptions for 38 yards (12.7 ypc) and two kickoff returns for 33 yards.

Joseph Wilson Bio | GoHolyCross.com
Wilson was an outstanding running back for Holy Cross from 1970-1972, twice winning the Davitt Award as the team’s top offensive back. At the time of his graduation, Wilson held the all-time school records for most rushing yards in a single game (274 against Rutgers in 1972), a single season (973 in 1971) and a career (2,350). He also holds the record for Holy Cross’ longest ever rush from scrimmage, with a 94-yard run against Boston University in 1970. Wilson ranked third in both points scored (146) and touchdowns scored (24) at the end of his career.​
During his time with the Crusaders, Wilson received the Turco Award as the most valuable player of the 1971 homecoming game against Boston University, and the O’Melia Award as the most valuable player of the 1971 game with Boston College.​
Selected by the Cincinnati Bengals in the eighth round of the 1973 National Football League draft, Wilson went on to play two seasons in the NFL for the Bengals and the New England Patriots. He was inducted into the Holy Cross Varsity Club Hall of Fame in 1978, as the youngest man ever enshrined and the first African American to be honored.​


Semi-related: - Sept 8, 2018:


And on another side note, I stumbled across this article while researching Joe Wilson. It is an interesting column on one of his Crusader teammates and four other notables at Holy Cross while Wilson was a student there:

Perfect Dolphin and the Holy Cross 'Fraternity' | Bleacher Report
 

jmt57

Moderator
Staff member
Today in Patriots History
Another vet gets a ring as a Patriot


Happy 45th birthday to Jed Weaver
Born August 11, 1976 in Bend, Oregon
Patriot TE, 2004; uniform #85
Signed as a free agent September 29, 2004




Jed Weaver was a 7th round draft pick by the Eagles in 1999. Primarily a blocking end, the best season for the 6'4, 258 pound Oregon Duck came with San Francisco in 2003 when he had 35 receptions for 437 yards. Prior to that he spent three seasons in Miami, clearing paths for Ricky Williams when he led the NFL in rushing, and the Dolphins twice made the playoffs.

Foxborough was the final stop of Weaver's six-season NFL career. He played in ten games with one start for the Pats, and earned a ring for Super Bowl 39 in the final game of his NFL career. Jed played in 90 NFL games, with 88 receptions and six touchdowns.


Sept 28, 2004:


March 30, 2017 interview:
Winning the Super Bowl is the pinnacle of success in football and it was up to that point the greatest accomplishment of my life. No words can express the excitement and satisfaction I felt once we were crowned champions!



In 1999 Jed started a six year NFL career that took him to Philadelphia, Miami, San Francisco and finally Boston where he played with the Super Bowl XXXIX Champion New England Patriots.​

Playing for the Miami Dolphins and living South Florida was such a great experience that Jed and his wife Jori decided to make their permanent residence here in South Florida.​

Jed’s motivation for going into the real estate business was to provide a service to his clients that he was unable to receive during his playing career. His #1 priority is his clients happiness and he takes the work ethic and determination required to succeed in the NFL into his Real Estate business. He works tirelessly to find his clients the best luxury property for their needs now and into the future. Without a completely happy client a realtor has nothing. This mind set has enabled him to close over $50,000,000 in purchase & sale contracts in just 8 short years in the business.​

Jed works in all aspects of the market from South Beach to Palm Beach focusing on luxury, high end properties, waterfront communities and distressed asset purchases.​
 

jmt57

Moderator
Staff member
Today in Patriots History
Another SB 39 Ring Winner - but he sold it!


Happy 42nd birthday to Brock Williams
Born August 11, 1979 in Hammond, Louisiana
Patriot CB, 2001-2002; uniform #28

Pats 3rd round (86th overall) selection of the 2001 draft, from Notre Dame



Brock Williams never played a down for the Patriots, but he did receive
a Super Bowl ring - which he infamously pawned for just $2,600.


As a rookie Brock Williams was on the active roster in week one, but was a healthy scratch. He then tore his ACL and was placed on injured reserve, missing the entire 2001 season. The following offseason Williams was limited by an ankle injury, and was released as part of final roster cuts. The next day the Patriots signed Williams to their practice squad, then released him for good on October 22. He later spent time with the Bears and Raiders, seeing action in 12 games before ending his NFL career being cut by Oakland at the end of the 2005 training camp.


Apr 22, 2011: ESPN the Magazine: When athletes can't keep up with their lifestyle, they turn to pawn shops for a loan


May 25, 2014: Brock Williams' 2001 Super Bowl ring still resides in Las Vegas at that very famous Pawn Shop | Sports Rings


Aug 11, 2015: A history of misappropriated Patriots rings | Boston.com
 

jmt57

Moderator
Staff member
Today in Patriots History
Did not buy into "Do Your Job" concept


Happy 41st birthday to Hakim Akbar
Born August 11, 1980 in Riverside, California
Patriot S, 2001; uniform #29
Pats 5th round (163rd overall) selection of the 2001 draft, from Washington


Nov 24, 2001:
Akbar was in satisfactory condition with non-life threatening injuries, said Nancy Cawley, spokeswoman for Rhode Island Hospital in Providence.​
Akbar was traveling north on Interstate 95 in Mansfield when his sport utility vehicle went off the highway rolled over at about 1:30 a.m., said State Police Lt. Paul Maloney. Maloney said Akbar was ejected from the vehicle and landed in a marsh.​
He was alone in the car.​
Maloney said speed may have been a factor in the crash, but alcohol does not appear to have been involved. The crash is still under investigation, he said.​
Patriots coach Bill Belichick said he didn’t know the extent of Akbar’s injuries. “I think it’s unlikely he’ll be playing football any time in the immediate future,” he said.​


Jan 29, 2008:
In November 2001, a year after Williams was hurt, Akbar suffered a spinal injury and nearly died. He was driving home, alone and tired, after socializing with teammates. He says he fell asleep at the wheel and woke up to find he was speeding down the interstate, going at least 80 mph.​
His Cadillac Escalade went off the road, and Akbar, who wasn’t wearing a seat belt, was thrown 30 feet through the sunroof. He spent a month in the hospital, eating through an IV, with three fractured vertebrae, broken ribs and an injured hip and shoulder.​
Police said alcohol wasn’t involved. But Akbar was charged with driving with the intent to endanger, among other offenses.​
A doctor told Akbar he wouldn’t play football again. But three months after the accident, Akbar was working out, preparing to make his way back. Although he didn’t play in the Super Bowl, the Patriots presented him with a ring. Afterward, the team released him.​
Akbar’s career became a blur of teams and injuries — the Texans, Rams, Buccaneers, Jaguars and the Canadian Football League’s Calgary Stampeders; a torn knee ligament, separated shoulder, pulled hamstring and two dislocated fingers. Since quitting the game in 2006, Akbar has had three surgeries, with three more to go.​
These days, Akbar lives in California. He’s investing in real estate and thinking of starting a bar and grill, maybe with some memorabilia on the walls.​

Oct 19, 2018: Husky Legend: Hakim Akbar | University of Washington Athletics
A turning point in the 2000 season was when Akbar's close friend and fellow safety Curtis Williams was seriously injured during a game against Stanford, where Williams was left paralyzed. The impact of Williams' unfortunate incident had a dramatic effect on Akbar who was in his third year of playing alongside Williams.​
"Especially when Curtis went down, we did it for him, we wanted to play hard to get him a ring," said Akbar. "We did it for Curtis, we had CW on our jersey, we came together really strong and hard for Curtis and for each other. We all drove off of each other."​
After the end of Akbar's junior season, he declared for the 2001 NFL Draft where he would be taken by the New England Patriots in the fifth round. Though injuries hampered Akbar's play on the field, he was also presented with a different brand of football than he was accustomed to.​
"It was a lot different, it was more of a business," said Akbar on the NFL. "The college game is so passionate. I noticed it was us being told to do our job, everyone does their job and let's go get them. That was our breakdown in the huddle one time, everybody knows their job, and execute your job. I couldn't relate to that. And to that I was frustrated, with the lack of passion that was there. It was more about individuals than a team sometimes. It was a big difference, and it took some adjusting from me to understand it is a business, and it isn't college anymore."​
Akbar received a Super Bowl ring after the Patriots won the 2002 Super Bowl. The NFL career of Akbar would span until 2006 after playing for five different NFL franchises.​

Mar 20, 2002:
The New England Patriots announced that they have released safety Hakim Akbar. The Patriots drafted the 6-foot, 212-pound prospect from the University of Washington in the fifth round (163rd overall) of the 2001 NFL draft. He appeared in six games and recorded five special teams tackles before being placed on the reserve/non-football injury list for the remainder of the season on Nov. 16, 2001.​



It has neither been confirmed nor denied that Hakim is a relative of Admiral Ackbar
 

jmt57

Moderator
Staff member
Today in Patriots History
A replacement player and other August 11 trivia


Happy 57th birthday to Rogers Alexander
Born August 11, 1964 in Washington, DC
Patriot LB, 1987; uniform #91

Rogers Alexander was fourth round draft pick out of Penn State by the Jets in 1986. He played in all three Replacement Games for the Patriots in 1987.

Rogers Alexander attended Penn State from 1982 to 1985. While at Penn State he was a member of the 1982 National Championship Team and Team Captain in 1985 for the National Championship game against Oklahoma. Alexander was also recognize as the MVP of the Hula Bowl as a Nittany Lion.​

Alexander was the 4th round pick in the 1985 NFL draft by the NY Jets and also played for the New England Patriots.​

For the past 5 years Rogers as been employed as a consultant in mostly service related or charitable industry advisement. He has been involved with children and young adult mentoring since being a DeMatha Day Camp Counselor in high school. While a police officer in Washington DC he witnessed first hand the impact of the environment on young lives. C4C was a natural fit for Rogers.​




Joe Paterno with his 1985 Penn State captains: Alexander, Todd Moules, and Mike Zordich
The undefeated Nittany Lions lost to #2 Oklahoma 25-7 in the Orange Bowl,
in what was Barry Switzer's third national championship.​




Aug 11, 2011:
In their first preseason game of 2011, all the New England Patriots players wear a MHK patch on their uniform. The Patriots dedicated the 2011 season to the late Myra Kraft, who died on June 20 after a long battle with cancer.






Rookie Stevan Ridley scored three touchdowns and backup quarterbacks Brian Hoyer and Ryan Mallett looked impressive as the Patriots opened the preseason with a 47-12 rout of the Jacksonville Jaguars at Gillette Stadium.​

Ridley, a rookie out of LSU, rushed 16 times for 64 yards and two touchdowns. He also caught seven passes for 47 yards and another score.​

With Tom Brady sitting out the game, Hoyer got the start. He played the first half, going 15 of 21 for 171 yards and a touchdown. Mallett played the second half, finishing 12 of 19 for 164 yards.​

Taylor Price caught five passes for 105 yards and a touchdown.​











And one other pro football player born on this date with a New England connection:

- Ned Mathews (1918-2002)
The wingback scored ten touchdowns from 1941-1947 with four teams, including the Boston Yanks. Mathews was also head coach of the Chicago Rockets of the All-American Football Conference, who finished fourth in the AAFC West behind the Cleveland Browns, San Francisco 49ers and Los Angeles Dons.
 

captain stone

Hall of Fame Poster
Today in Patriots History
Another SB 39 Ring Winner - but he sold it!


Happy 42nd birthday to Brock Williams
Born August 11, 1979 in Hammond, Louisiana
Patriot CB, 2001-2002; uniform #28

Pats 3rd round (86th overall) selection of the 2001 draft, from Notre Dame



Brock Williams never played a down for the Patriots, but he did receive
a Super Bowl ring - which he infamously pawned for just $2,600.


As a rookie Brock Williams was on the active roster in week one, but was a healthy scratch. He then tore his ACL and was placed on injured reserve, missing the entire 2001 season. The following offseason Williams was limited by an ankle injury, and was released as part of final roster cuts. The next day the Patriots signed Williams to their practice squad, then released him for good on October 22. He later spent time with the Bears and Raiders, seeing action in 12 games before ending his NFL career being cut by Oakland at the end of the 2005 training camp.


Apr 22, 2011: ESPN the Magazine: When athletes can't keep up with their lifestyle, they turn to pawn shops for a loan


May 25, 2014: Brock Williams' 2001 Super Bowl ring still resides in Las Vegas at that very famous Pawn Shop | Sports Rings


Aug 11, 2015: A history of misappropriated Patriots rings | Boston.com

What a predictably lousy pick that stiff was...Thanks Bill.
 
Last edited:

captain stone

Hall of Fame Poster
Today in Patriots History
Did not buy into "Do Your Job" concept


Happy 41st birthday to Hakim Akbar
Born August 11, 1980 in Riverside, California
Patriot S, 2001; uniform #29
Pats 5th round (163rd overall) selection of the 2001 draft, from Washington


Nov 24, 2001:
Akbar was in satisfactory condition with non-life threatening injuries, said Nancy Cawley, spokeswoman for Rhode Island Hospital in Providence.​
Akbar was traveling north on Interstate 95 in Mansfield when his sport utility vehicle went off the highway rolled over at about 1:30 a.m., said State Police Lt. Paul Maloney. Maloney said Akbar was ejected from the vehicle and landed in a marsh.​
He was alone in the car.​
Maloney said speed may have been a factor in the crash, but alcohol does not appear to have been involved. The crash is still under investigation, he said.​
Patriots coach Bill Belichick said he didn’t know the extent of Akbar’s injuries. “I think it’s unlikely he’ll be playing football any time in the immediate future,” he said.​


Jan 29, 2008:
In November 2001, a year after Williams was hurt, Akbar suffered a spinal injury and nearly died. He was driving home, alone and tired, after socializing with teammates. He says he fell asleep at the wheel and woke up to find he was speeding down the interstate, going at least 80 mph.​
His Cadillac Escalade went off the road, and Akbar, who wasn’t wearing a seat belt, was thrown 30 feet through the sunroof. He spent a month in the hospital, eating through an IV, with three fractured vertebrae, broken ribs and an injured hip and shoulder.​
Police said alcohol wasn’t involved. But Akbar was charged with driving with the intent to endanger, among other offenses.​
A doctor told Akbar he wouldn’t play football again. But three months after the accident, Akbar was working out, preparing to make his way back. Although he didn’t play in the Super Bowl, the Patriots presented him with a ring. Afterward, the team released him.​
Akbar’s career became a blur of teams and injuries — the Texans, Rams, Buccaneers, Jaguars and the Canadian Football League’s Calgary Stampeders; a torn knee ligament, separated shoulder, pulled hamstring and two dislocated fingers. Since quitting the game in 2006, Akbar has had three surgeries, with three more to go.​
These days, Akbar lives in California. He’s investing in real estate and thinking of starting a bar and grill, maybe with some memorabilia on the walls.​

Oct 19, 2018: Husky Legend: Hakim Akbar | University of Washington Athletics
A turning point in the 2000 season was when Akbar's close friend and fellow safety Curtis Williams was seriously injured during a game against Stanford, where Williams was left paralyzed. The impact of Williams' unfortunate incident had a dramatic effect on Akbar who was in his third year of playing alongside Williams.​
"Especially when Curtis went down, we did it for him, we wanted to play hard to get him a ring," said Akbar. "We did it for Curtis, we had CW on our jersey, we came together really strong and hard for Curtis and for each other. We all drove off of each other."​
After the end of Akbar's junior season, he declared for the 2001 NFL Draft where he would be taken by the New England Patriots in the fifth round. Though injuries hampered Akbar's play on the field, he was also presented with a different brand of football than he was accustomed to.​
"It was a lot different, it was more of a business," said Akbar on the NFL. "The college game is so passionate. I noticed it was us being told to do our job, everyone does their job and let's go get them. That was our breakdown in the huddle one time, everybody knows their job, and execute your job. I couldn't relate to that. And to that I was frustrated, with the lack of passion that was there. It was more about individuals than a team sometimes. It was a big difference, and it took some adjusting from me to understand it is a business, and it isn't college anymore."​
Akbar received a Super Bowl ring after the Patriots won the 2002 Super Bowl. The NFL career of Akbar would span until 2006 after playing for five different NFL franchises.​

Mar 20, 2002:
The New England Patriots announced that they have released safety Hakim Akbar. The Patriots drafted the 6-foot, 212-pound prospect from the University of Washington in the fifth round (163rd overall) of the 2001 NFL draft. He appeared in six games and recorded five special teams tackles before being placed on the reserve/non-football injury list for the remainder of the season on Nov. 16, 2001.​



It has neither been confirmed nor denied that Hakim is a relative of Admiral Ackbar

This dude, on the other hand, was taken close enough to where he should've gone...Too bad about his accident; he might've been useful to us for at least the length of his rookie contract...
 

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