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White House summary of case for national health care

Discussion in 'Political Discussion' started by Patters, Aug 13, 2009.

  1. Patters

    Patters Moderator Staff Member PatsFans.com Supporter

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    This is from a White House email, and contains info that the White House is hoping to go viral in response to all the distortions and lies being pushed by insurance companies and their Republican allies. I'm curious to know what people find most objectionable, positive, dishonest, or noteworthy. (Note, I'm printing more than 4 sentences because this is not copyrighted and the email expressly encourages its distribution.)

    8 ways reform provides security and stability to those with or without coverage

    1. Ends Discrimination for Pre-Existing Conditions: Insurance companies will be prohibited from refusing you coverage because of your medical history.
    2. Ends Exorbitant Out-of-Pocket Expenses, Deductibles or Co-Pays: Insurance companies will have to abide by yearly caps on how much they can charge for out-of-pocket expenses.
    3. Ends Cost-Sharing for Preventive Care: Insurance companies must fully cover, without charge, regular checkups and tests that help you prevent illness, such as mammograms or eye and foot exams for diabetics.
    4. Ends Dropping of Coverage for Seriously Ill: Insurance companies will be prohibited from dropping or watering down insurance coverage for those who become seriously ill.
    5. Ends Gender Discrimination: Insurance companies will be prohibited from charging you more because of your gender.
    6. Ends Annual or Lifetime Caps on Coverage: Insurance companies will be prevented from placing annual or lifetime caps on the coverage you receive.
    7. Extends Coverage for Young Adults: Children would continue to be eligible for family coverage through the age of 26.
    8. Guarantees Insurance Renewal: Insurance companies will be required to renew any policy as long as the policyholder pays their premium in full. Insurance companies won't be allowed to refuse renewal because someone became sick.

    Learn more and get details: Health Insurance Consumer Protections

    8 common myths about health insurance reform

    1. Reform will stop "rationing" - not increase it: It’s a myth that reform will mean a "government takeover" of health care or lead to "rationing." To the contrary, reform will forbid many forms of rationing that are currently being used by insurance companies.
    2. We can’t afford reform: It's the status quo we can't afford. It’s a myth that reform will bust the budget. To the contrary, the President has identified ways to pay for the vast majority of the up-front costs by cutting waste, fraud, and abuse within existing government health programs; ending big subsidies to insurance companies; and increasing efficiency with such steps as coordinating care and streamlining paperwork. In the long term, reform can help bring down costs that will otherwise lead to a fiscal crisis.
    3. Reform would encourage "euthanasia": It does not. It’s a malicious myth that reform would encourage or even require euthanasia for seniors. For seniors who want to consult with their family and physicians about end-of life decisions, reform will help to cover these voluntary, private consultations for those who want help with these personal and difficult family decisions.
    4. Vets' health care is safe and sound: It’s a myth that health insurance reform will affect veterans' access to the care they get now. To the contrary, the President's budget significantly expands coverage under the VA, extending care to 500,000 more veterans who were previously excluded. The VA Healthcare system will continue to be available for all eligible veterans.
    5. Reform will benefit small business - not burden it: It’s a myth that health insurance reform will hurt small businesses. To the contrary, reform will ease the burdens on small businesses, provide tax credits to help them pay for employee coverage and help level the playing field with big firms who pay much less to cover their employees on average.
    6. Your Medicare is safe, and stronger with reform: It’s myth that Health Insurance Reform would be financed by cutting Medicare benefits. To the contrary, reform will improve the long-term financial health of Medicare, ensure better coordination, eliminate waste and unnecessary subsidies to insurance companies, and help to close the Medicare "doughnut" hole to make prescription drugs more affordable for seniors.
    7. You can keep your own insurance: It’s myth that reform will force you out of your current insurance plan or force you to change doctors. To the contrary, reform will expand your choices, not eliminate them.
    8. No, government will not do anything with your bank account: It is an absurd myth that government will be in charge of your bank accounts. Health insurance reform will simplify administration, making it easier and more convenient for you to pay bills in a method that you choose. Just like paying a phone bill or a utility bill, you can pay by traditional check, or by a direct electronic payment. And forms will be standardized so they will be easier to understand. The choice is up to you – and the same rules of privacy will apply as they do for all other electronic payments that people make.

    Learn more and get details:
    Get the facts about the stability and security you get from health insurance reform | Health Insurance Reform Reality Check
    Frequently Asked Questions about Health Insurance Reform | Health Insurance Reform Reality Check

    8 Reasons We Need Health Insurance Reform Now

    1. Coverage Denied to Millions: A recent national survey estimated that 12.6 million non-elderly adults – 36 percent of those who tried to purchase health insurance directly from an insurance company in the individual insurance market – were in fact discriminated against because of a pre-existing condition in the previous three years or dropped from coverage when they became seriously ill. Learn more: Coverage Denied: How the Current Health Insurance System Leaves Millions Behind
    2. Less Care for More Costs: With each passing year, Americans are paying more for health care coverage. Employer-sponsored health insurance premiums have nearly doubled since 2000, a rate three times faster than wages. In 2008, the average premium for a family plan purchased through an employer was $12,680, nearly the annual earnings of a full-time minimum wage job. Americans pay more than ever for health insurance, but get less coverage. Learn more: Hidden Costs of Health Care Report
    3. Roadblocks to Care for Women: Women’s reproductive health requires more regular contact with health care providers, including yearly pap smears, mammograms, and obstetric care. Women are also more likely to report fair or poor health than men (9.5% versus 9.0%). While rates of chronic conditions such as diabetes and high blood pressure are similar to men, women are twice as likely to suffer from headaches and are more likely to experience joint, back or neck pain. These chronic conditions often require regular and frequent treatment and follow-up care. Learn more: Roadblocks to Health Care
    4. Hard Times in the Heartland: Throughout rural America, there are nearly 50 million people who face challenges in accessing health care. The past several decades have consistently shown higher rates of poverty, mortality, uninsurance, and limited access to a primary health care provider in rural areas. With the recent economic downturn, there is potential for an increase in many of the health disparities and access concerns that are already elevated in rural communities. Learn more: Health Care and the Rural Economy
    5. Small Businesses Struggle to Provide Health Coverage: Nearly one-third of the uninsured – 13 million people – are employees of firms with less than 100 workers. From 2000 to 2007, the proportion of non-elderly Americans covered by employer-based health insurance fell from 66% to 61%. Much of this decline stems from small business. The percentage of small businesses offering coverage dropped from 68% to 59%, while large firms held stable at 99%. About a third of such workers in firms with fewer than 50 employees obtain insurance through a spouse. Learn more: Small Businesses Struggle to Provide Health Coverage
    6. The Tragedies are Personal: Half of all personal bankruptcies are at least partly the result of medical expenses. The typical elderly couple may have to save nearly $300,000 to pay for health costs not covered by Medicare alone. Learn more: Escalating Health Care Costs
    7. Diminishing Access to Care: From 2000 to 2007, the proportion of non-elderly Americans covered by employer-based health insurance fell from 66% to 61%. An estimated 87 million people - one in every three Americans under the age of 65 - were uninsured at some point in 2007 and 2008. More than 80% of the uninsured are in working families. Learn more: Diminishing Access to Care
    8. The Trends are Troubling: Without reform, health care costs will continue to skyrocket unabated, putting unbearable strain on families, businesses, and state and federal government budgets. Perhaps the most visible sign of the need for health care reform is the 46 million Americans currently without health insurance - projections suggest that this number will rise to about 72 million in 2040 in the absence of reform. Learn more: http://www.WhiteHouse.gov/assets/documents/CEA_Health_Care_Report.pdf
     
    Last edited: Aug 13, 2009
  2. DarrylS

    DarrylS PatsFans.com Supporter PatsFans.com Supporter

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    This is where the death panels come in, read between the lines..:rolleyes:

    They want the government to come into your home and tell you how to raise your children, the worse fears are realized...:rolleyes:

    I knew it covered abortion on demand and even into the third term..:rolleyes:

    This bill is classic nazism:D:D:D
     
  3. reflexblue

    reflexblue PatsFans.com Supporter PatsFans.com Supporter

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    #91 Jersey

    I worked in the health care field for many years. My father, grandfather, and uncle were doctors, my cousin is an Anathesiologist. So i think i know a little bit about the subject and think that it needs over hauling. I'm not going to go into the reasons here because i have many times over several years, and because i just don't care any longer. If people want to remain ignorant about the facts they get what they deserve. I and my family have Very good health care and will continue to. I know Obamas not going to force me to change my health care if i don't want to. I'm tired of trying to convince others here that they already have rationed health care at insane prices......so the hell with them, let them revel in their ignorance.
     
    Last edited: Aug 13, 2009
  4. PatriotsReign

    PatriotsReign Hall of Fame Poster

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    #18 Jersey

    These are my concerns:

    1. I WANT private health insurance to remain viable.

    2. I don't want MORE people employed by the federal gov't. I'll take privately employed workers anytime over gov't employment.

    3. The gov't will utilize some "fairness" philosophy when hiring for the new health care dept. I don't care about rainbows, I want the best qualified to get the jobs.

    4. I don't want our federal gov't to get any bigger.

    5. I would like to see corp lobbyists eliminated before any "contracts" are signed. I can see a lot of funny business going on behind closed doors.

    Patters, why are you trying to sell this to us? We should just let it go the way the majority want it to. That's only right.
     
  5. sdaniels7114

    sdaniels7114 Experienced Starter w/First Big Contract

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    This is a debate forum, that's the point.

    Your question is about as sensible as someone at a Football game asking why everyone keeps trying to get into those zones down at the end of the field.
     
  6. apple strudel

    apple strudel Banned

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    It will.

    In this economy jobs are jobs.

    Except there are already federal laws applying to all employers that employ fairness as a criteria. :confused:

    I don't see how this justifies shooting ourselves in the foot over health care reform.

    Spread this to the entire government and you're onto something. Generally I agree, but others have made arguments about the pragmatism of having certain major allies.

    We need health care reform badly in this country.

    The majority wants health care reform.
     
  7. Patters

    Patters Moderator Staff Member PatsFans.com Supporter

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    Actually, PR, I' not thrilled with the Democratic health care plan. Insurance co's provide no added value, and it's bizarre to me that so many people should be pro-insurance (which is really nothing more than a capitalist form of socialism!).

    Government is far more transparent, has existing checks and balances (in the Constitution, in the political process, and in various good government groups right and left), and is in a position to impose cost-saving standards and buying principles. (After all, with single payer, the government is buying almost all the prescription drugs -- and should be able to negotiate an even better discount than the $80 billion already negotiated.)

    Let medical care be handled privately, which makes sense, but have the government pay for it through taxes, which would probably reduce the cost of our medical care by about 50% without reducing the quality. Insurance companies could still play a role, by offering value-added insurance policies (for those who want a private room, elective surgery done right away, more comfortable rehab facilities, etc.).

    That said, I do think the Democratic plan is a step in the right direction, and perhaps if our country continues to move to the left we will take other steps, though honestly I doubt that will happen in my lifetime.

    I believe our social programs have so far been a success -- whether we're talking about social security, Medicare, veterans benefits, education, and so on. I think overall, the government does as a good a job as the private sector. No one is clamoring to get rid of Medicare, Social Security, public education, and I don't think anyone will clamor to get rid of national health care. It will prove to be convenient, cost effective, and helpful to a lot of kids and others who do not currently have health insurance or whose insurance imposes all sorts of caps and limitations.
     
    Last edited: Aug 13, 2009
  8. PatriotsReign

    PatriotsReign Hall of Fame Poster

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    #18 Jersey

    We debate, yes. But we don't hold our own town meetings hoping to convince our members to support an issue.

    But thank you for taking the time to attempt to correct me even if you are wrong.
     
  9. PatriotsReign

    PatriotsReign Hall of Fame Poster

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    #18 Jersey

    Not if companies decide that they'd save money by having their employees go on the national plan

    I don't agree, jobs are not jobs. Private sector jobs "create" money while public jobs use tax dollars. Also, Federal jobs include a pension plan...something I think should go away. Make them get 401K's like everyone else!

    Only anti-descrimation is enforced. I don't want to see less qualified applicants hired over better qualified ones.

    No but let's not rush through it just to get it done



    Yes, but in a moderate way, not a liberal one.
     
  10. Harry Boy

    Harry Boy Look Up, It's Amazing PatsFans.com Supporter

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    It sounds Great
    I don't trust government, I don't trust politicians and I don't trust Obama, I don't want Government involved in my family's health matters.
    Politicians are professional LIARS it is who they are, LIARS, keep the government and the filthy politicians out of your life and your health issues as much as you can, politicians will destroy your life and GRIN while they are doing it, they are all like Dick Cheney.

    Obama is sinking like a rock in the polls, all the "Yes We Can" bullsh!t is sinking with him.
     
  11. apple strudel

    apple strudel Banned

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    Um, the proposed bill is entirely moderate. A liberal bill nationalizes the health care system.
     
  12. sdaniels7114

    sdaniels7114 Experienced Starter w/First Big Contract

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    Ok, what is debate then if it isn't working to get others to support an issue?
     
  13. godef

    godef In the Starting Line-Up

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    There's a common flaw in your thinking reflected in all these comments. Healthcare will always have costs associated with it, and it will still continue to be actually performed by private and public hostpitals like it always has, and not the US government. So what it all comes down to is who makes the payment. If its not from your company, which in most cases means at least partially out of your own pocket, then it will come from the government instead. This is all part of what the GDP is all about.

    The government, as part of the package, is talking about reforming healthcare, which will reduce its cost regardless of what bucket it comes out of. Additionally, UHC would be non-profit. Of course, it still needs revenue to run the whole thing, but there would not be the excessive profits that the PHC industry skims off the top.

    So healthcare reform would benefit us in two ways:

    1. By reducing costs by making the industry (private or national) run more efficiently.

    2. By eliminating already excessive profts which is typical of private industry (re, banks, pharmaceuticals, etc, etc etc)..
     
  14. godef

    godef In the Starting Line-Up

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    Then how do people learn what healthcare reform is really all about? Seems like most of the "convincing" that's occuring these days comes from the right in the form of "death panel" hysteria and the like.
     
  15. reflexblue

    reflexblue PatsFans.com Supporter PatsFans.com Supporter

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    #91 Jersey

    After going back and reading this i realized my earlier post ws out of place. I don't find anything i don't like in the 8 reforms.
     
  16. Holy Diver

    Holy Diver Pro Bowl Player

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    #80 Jersey

    sinking all the way down to 53%......very similar to the final vote count in the election....

    President - Election Center 2008 - Elections & Politics from CNN.com

    Obama 53%
    Mccain 46%
     

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