Welcome to PatsFans.com

Should Churches Be Tax Exempt?

Discussion in 'Political Discussion' started by State, Dec 30, 2010.

  1. State

    State In the Starting Line-Up

    Joined:
    Jan 10, 2005
    Messages:
    2,545
    Likes Received:
    5
    Ratings:
    +22 / 1 / -8

    #70 Jersey

  2. Nikolai

    Nikolai Football Atheist PatsFans.com Supporter

    Joined:
    Sep 17, 2009
    Messages:
    6,800
    Likes Received:
    568
    Ratings:
    +1,500 / 1 / -1

    #54 Jersey

    I don't think churches should be tax exempt unless they can prove that they are contributing some sort of tangible welfare to the community (without religious prejudice). Even then, the tax break needs to be proportional to the amount of welfare provided; i.e. a canned goods drive in December is not worth $200,000. The government should not be subsidizing any religion; at least if one has a Jeffersonian view of American politics.
     
    Last edited: Dec 30, 2010
  3. Real World

    Real World Moderator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Aug 15, 2006
    Messages:
    27,452
    Likes Received:
    327
    Ratings:
    +913 / 7 / -3

    Aren't non profits tax exempt? If so, then wouldn't a church fall under the same guidelines more or less? I'd say non profits being taxed exempt is fine (generally speaking), and I'd figure the church would therefore be no different. In a general sense.
     
  4. Harry Boy

    Harry Boy Look Up, It's Amazing PatsFans.com Supporter

    Joined:
    Nov 10, 2005
    Messages:
    41,728
    Likes Received:
    279
    Ratings:
    +1,146 / 5 / -10

    ----------no----------
     
  5. IcyPatriot

    IcyPatriot ------------- PatsFans.com Supporter

    Joined:
    Sep 13, 2004
    Messages:
    39,690
    Likes Received:
    760
    Ratings:
    +2,013 / 41 / -31

    #24 Jersey

    churches provide valuable services to the community ... and when I say church i mean any and all religious institutions. If they were taxed they would provide less services to the disadvantaged and the government would then bear more responsibilities. I also don't think you can directly quantify their value as non-profits.

    Religious institutions, arts, education ... any and all non profits make great contributions to society that are near impossible to quantify. then again look at countries that don't have religious institutions like we do here where any and all faiths are welcome to set up shop - I just don't see where a price tag can be put upon the benefits. The atheists kind of get screwed in it all but nothing is ever 100% except death and taxes as we all well know.

    Kind of rambled that out ... hope it makes sense regarding my opinion.
     
  6. DarrylS

    DarrylS PatsFans.com Supporter PatsFans.com Supporter

    Joined:
    Sep 13, 2004
    Messages:
    43,250
    Likes Received:
    328
    Ratings:
    +824 / 27 / -33

    Recently there has been a move for payment in lieu of taxes(PILOT) for many tax exempt institutions..

    But time to rethink this whole thing, churches certainly get involved in politics and local races.. that line has completely blurred.

    The other factor is non-profits are eating up many of our cities, in Boston Universities and Hospitals.. in Providence; RISD, Brown, Johnson and Wales and the big hospitals are taking over much of our city space.. all of which are tax exempt.

    The catholic church also owns vast tracts of land often in prestigious locations which is not taxed...

    Maybe they get break, but as they all use city services time to rethink this policy..
     
  7. Mrs.PatsFanInVa

    Mrs.PatsFanInVa PatsFans.com Supporter PatsFans.com Supporter

    Joined:
    Sep 7, 2009
    Messages:
    16,429
    Likes Received:
    411
    Ratings:
    +789 / 14 / -6

    #24 Jersey

    There are a few differences: Most NPOs are required by law to detail their financial income and expenditures and to answer to someone.

    Churches are not.


    Most larger NPO organizations are required to publish their financial reports detailing their income and expenditure for the public. In many aspects they are similar to business entities though there are often significant differences. Both non-profit and for-profit entities must have board members, steering committee members, or trustees who owe the organization a fiduciary duty of loyalty and trust. A notable exception to this involves churches, which are often not required to disclose finances to anyone, including church members.

    Non-profit organization - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
     
  8. State

    State In the Starting Line-Up

    Joined:
    Jan 10, 2005
    Messages:
    2,545
    Likes Received:
    5
    Ratings:
    +22 / 1 / -8

    #70 Jersey

    Non-profits are able to operate under a looser set of accounting rules, too.

    I think the same argument--made stronger because the First Amendment isn't involved--can be made to treat so-called "non-profits" similar to a business whose business is, after all, service.

    And have you seen some of the salaries of the executives of these "non profits"?
     
  9. Real World

    Real World Moderator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Aug 15, 2006
    Messages:
    27,452
    Likes Received:
    327
    Ratings:
    +913 / 7 / -3

    It's why I made the point to say "generally speaking". Clearly a NPO who's paying it's employees, or CEO, an outrageous sum wouldn't be one that I'd approve of. In a general sense, I have no issue with charitable, or not for profit organizations (churches, mosques, temples, etc. Salvation Army, Boys and Girls Clubs of America, etc.) being tax exempt. What I wouldn't be supportive of, is any type of blank check exemption that would allow these institutions to include any and all property they own/buy to fall under that exempted status. The specifics, as is the case with most everything, is what would matter to me. In terms of the general, and vague question of whether religious institutions (I prefer that to singling out churches) should be tax exempt, I say yes. A religious institution could never afford to pay the property taxes around here. Maybe what local governments could do, is add a 3rd classification in addition to the current residential and commercial, with a minimal rate applied. So instead of paying no taxes, an NPO class property would pay some sort of minimal amount.

    One thing I hate is the tax exemption for colleges. I hate it because these scum sucking universities charge $40-50k per year in tuition, and gobble up tax free property at the same time. I believe Harvard has something like $16 billion in it's endowment fund. GROSS.
     
  10. The Brandon Five

    The Brandon Five Experienced Starter w/First Big Contract

    Joined:
    Aug 21, 2010
    Messages:
    7,030
    Likes Received:
    167
    Ratings:
    +513 / 9 / -4

    #75 Jersey

    Meanwhile, in the UK they are rioting and pissing on statues of Churchill over charging tuition of up to 9,000 GBP.
     
  11. IcyPatriot

    IcyPatriot ------------- PatsFans.com Supporter

    Joined:
    Sep 13, 2004
    Messages:
    39,690
    Likes Received:
    760
    Ratings:
    +2,013 / 41 / -31

    #24 Jersey


    riots are a way of life over there ... I think they enjoy it.
     

Share This Page

unset ($sidebar_block_show); ?>