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Score 1 For Chris Christie

Discussion in 'Political Discussion' started by Mrs.PatsFanInVa, Aug 4, 2011.

  1. Mrs.PatsFanInVa

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    #11 Jersey

    So, Harry, 13 and all of you who've supported Chris Christie and wished that he'd run for president - I now understand what you see in him.

    New Jersey’s governor Chris Christie has been known to spread a conservative agenda across the state. But a week ago he surprised both his supporters and his opponents when he defended his appointment of Muslim-American lawyer Sohail Mohammed to the state’s superior court. Talking Points Memo’s Josh Marshall flagged the gruff gov’s tirade against bigotry in his blog today.

    “It’s just unnecessary to be accusing this guy of things just because of his religious background,” Chrstie said at a press conference last week.

    When asked by a reporter about the threat of Sharia laws, Christie called the complaints “crap.” “Sharia Law has nothing to do with this at all, it’s crazy!” he said at the press conference. “The guy is an American citizen!,” he yelled. “Sharia Law business is just crap.” Watch the show for yourself above.


    New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie: “This Sharia Law Business Is Crap” - COLORLINES
  2. cupofjoe1962

    cupofjoe1962 Rookie

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    I respect a politician who makes decisions based on the issue.

    I have not agreed with every stance taken by Scott Brown, but . I feel he makes his decisions based on the issue.

    Martha Coakley... was a rubber stamp "LEFT" vs RIGHT VOTE
    in favor of the LEFT.

    Lets face it... the left and right are not correct 100% of the time.
    You need to decide based on the issue. Too many base their decisons
    on thier parties side of the fence.
    Last edited: Aug 5, 2011
  3. Patsfanin Philly

    Patsfanin Philly Rookie

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    #95 Jersey

    Here's another response to someone who questioned why he sent his kids to parochial school....

    Voter to Chris Christie: Do your kids go to public school? Christie to voter: None of your business « Hot Air

    Sometimes a politician has a moment when they grab the reins and show leadership. Think of Reagan when he grabbed the microphone in the 1980 debate which was supposed to be between him and George H. W. Bush until all the other candidates showed up. Reagan grabbed the microphone and yelled " I 'm paying for this microphone Mr. Green ( it was Breen but whatever)
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OO2_49TycdE
    He showed leadership in contrast to what was perceived as a weak President Carter.
    Pawlenty had his opportunity when he called Romney's health care ObamaRomneycare in a TV interview but backed down when in a debate with Romney. He showed a lack of 'stones' and it will hurt him long term.
    Last edited: Aug 4, 2011
  4. Mrs.PatsFanInVa

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    #11 Jersey

    Oh, don't get me wrong, I do, too.

    I just wonder how people like Harry and 13 feel about one of their heroes going against their personal belief that Sharia Law is a real threat here and their belief that our government should do everything they can to prevent the possibility.

    I mean, how can it be a possibility, much less a threat, when someone so well-respected and admired like Chris Christie says, in no uncertain terms, that the fears about creeping Sharia laws in The USA is crap?
  5. wistahpatsfan

    wistahpatsfan Rookie

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    Unfortunately, what we know about politicians in this country are colored by the media and we don't get to see much more than sound-bites.

    From what the media shows of this guy makes me think Christie is a dick. Seems like he will never be "smoothe" enough to be presidential material regardless of his politics. He's the governor of NJ and I could care less what he says right now. If he becomes a Senator or Congressman, that's another story. He happens to be right on this issue, though. He's wrong when he tells a reporter that where his kids go to school is "none of their business". Hey, numbskull! If you want privacy, stay out of politics!
  6. The Brandon Five

    The Brandon Five Rookie

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    #75 Jersey

    I prefer those who have served in an executive office before (i.e. Governors > Senators > Representative).
  7. PatsFanInVa

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    I guess it's a nice moment for the rest of us to see Christie employing his well-known brashness in support of something not uniformly d1cky. Now we get to see what you on the right like so much about your twits constantly shouting and bullying and simultaneously being ever wronger with each outburst.

    Since this guy shouted and bullied and was right for once, it's fun to see what you guys see in your regularly appearing and collapsing rightie messiahs. You like it that they'll yell a point of view and grab headlines with a heartfelt soundbite you believe is the truth.

    Stylistically speaking, this evidently speaks to all of us now. We're all sick of the other point of view. In this particular case Christie shouted and bullied for a decent reason.

    Usually not so much.

    Yeah that's "leadership..."

    But on the other hand...

    Yeah, we might be in much better shape if Obama said "clean bill, on my desk, by July 15, or I go all fourteenth amendment. And send a black helicopter for Norquist..."
  8. PatriotsReign

    PatriotsReign Rookie

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    Like you, I'd vote for Christie in a heart-beat. I love politicians who don't fall into typical "hard-line" partisanship, don't you?

    Seems like a good, rational man with a conscience doesn't he?
  9. Patters

    Patters Moderator Staff Member PatsFans.com Supporter

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    Christie is hard-line partisanship, but even hard-line partisans occasionally get something right.

    His stand on the Sharia law is pretty much the only good thing Christie did. Recently, he came under fire for trying to defund a nationally recognized program (that involves police, prosecutors, doctors, and therapists) that aids sexually abused children. He lost that battle and actually had to hold two press conferences to try to rationalize his behavior. Also, his budget cuts have resulted in skyrocketing crime in poor areas of New Jersey

    Newark Shootings, Camden Burglaries Make Crime Christie

    Christie is also accused of misusing state funds and is blocking attempts to investigate his use of state helicopters.

    "Shootings in Newark surged 43 percent after New Jersey’s largest municipality fired 162 police officers in November. Camden burglaries rose 65 percent after the state’s poorest city shed half its force in January."
  10. PatriotsReign

    PatriotsReign Rookie

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    Patters, what people fail to recognize is that crime levels have nothing to do with the number of police officers an area can/should employ. The only factor determining funding for ANYTHING is "Revenue".

    We are now entering the age of balanced budgets. Moving forward on all fronts (federal, state, city, town and county) we will not be able to deficit spend. It's not a choice, it's what we must do.

    Get used to it. It's simple common sense.
    Last edited: Aug 7, 2011
  11. Patters

    Patters Moderator Staff Member PatsFans.com Supporter

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    Yes, I agree our budgets need to be more balanced, so we need to raise taxes on the wealthy. It the short term, it may not play out that way, but in the long-term it will.
  12. PatriotsReign

    PatriotsReign Rookie

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    And here is where we disagree. You want to increase revenues to meet budget and I support cutting budgets to meet revenues. Difference of opinion...that's what this country is all about!
  13. Mrs.PatsFanInVa

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    #11 Jersey

    Whoa there, Reign it in, will ya?

    I never said I'd vote for him.....when I said I understood what people like Harry saw in him - I meant his outspokenness.

    Just because he got one thing right doesn't mean I'm throwing my support behind him - on the contrary, I'd probably never vote for him for dogcatcher much less president.

    All it means is I admire the fact that he'll say whatever's on his mind - it doesn't mean I agree with him on everything he says or does.

    Mostly I was being tongue-in-cheek.
  14. PatriotsReign

    PatriotsReign Rookie

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    I know...my comments about you voting for him were also tongue in cheek!;)
    Last edited: Aug 7, 2011
  15. Mrs.PatsFanInVa

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    #11 Jersey

    In Washington DC, non-public terror alert advisories were quietly accompanied byincreased police patrols in the downtown National Mall area where sensitive federal buildings (White House, Congress) were located.

    Researchers Klick and Tabarrock (2004) concluded that there was strong statistical evidence that more police reduced crime and concluded that an increase of approximately 50% in police presence is expected to lead to a statistically significant reduction of between 12 to 16% in the crime
    level.


    During these alerts, other areas of Washington had a statistically insignificant
    reduction in crime. Notably, this showed that crime was not necessarily displaced from higher policed to lower policed areas.

    A similar study was published by economists Di Tella and Schargrodosky (2004) who examined the effects of more policing on crime following a terrorist attack on the main Jewish center in Buenos Aries. In the wake of the attack, in July 1994, all Jewish and Muslim institutions were given 24-hour police protection. The researchers collected data on motor vehicle thefts per block, before and after the decision to provide more police protection. They observed that the blocks that received police protection had 75% fewer
    car thefts than the blocks that did not have this increased level of protection.

    Another “natural experiment” study was conducted by Shi (2005) who studied the Cincinnati Police department following a U.S. Department of Justice investigation of racial profiling. The intense media attention, along with a parallel Federal investigation and subsequent oversight, left officers reluctant to take enforcement action in black neighborhoods, for fear of being accused of racism. Anecdotal and activity data showed that officers cut down on their criminal law enforcement activities immediately after the
    increased oversight was put in place. For example, drug and liquor law violations (e.g. proactive investigations) decreased by 46% and 76%, respectively.
    Changes in arrests for domestic violence situations (e.g. reactive investigations) showed little effect.

    In otherwords, while the numbers of officers remained constant, the “volume” of policing in Cincinnati deceased because of the reluctance of officers to engage in proactive street policing. The result of the decreased policing was that monthly felony crime (e.g. violentand property crime) increased by 16%. Shi (2005) notes that “the increase was greater for robbery, aggravated assault, burglary, and auto-theft, arguably the types of felonies
    which are most sensitive to policing than the rest”.

    There have been other studies that have examined police numbers and crime over a longer period of time to reduce the simultaneity bias. New York City has long been recognized as a community that has recovered economically and culturally because of increased public safety. Corman & Mocan (2000) analyzed 30 years of data and concluded that a 10% increase in the growth rate of arrests has the potential to cause a 9.4% decrease in the long-run growth rate of robberies, a 2.89% decrease in the growth rate of burglaries and a 2.72% decrease in the long-run growth rate of motor-vehicle
    thefts
    . Additionally, they found “robust evidence for the deterrent effects of arrests and police on most categories of serious felony arrests”.

    Marvell & Moody (1996) collected data from 56 U.S. cities, over twenty years, and found that an increase in the number of police officers does result in a reduction of crime in the subsequent year. They estimate that each additional officer added to a police force located in a large city will prevent an average of 24 serious crimes (i.e. murders, sexual assaults, robberies, aggravated assaults, burglaries, larcenies and auto thefts). They also
    conclude that hiring officers in urban areas will reduce crime far more than in smaller towns.


    http://www.majorcitieschiefs.org/pdf/news/more_policing_does_matter.pdf
  16. Patters

    Patters Moderator Staff Member PatsFans.com Supporter

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    Mrs. P, don't you know it's cheating when you provide evidence to support your point of view?
  17. PatriotsReign

    PatriotsReign Rookie

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    I never said police presence doesn't reduce crime. I'm saying we can't employ more police than we can afford. If a city believes it's more important to have strong police presence than their budgets will allow, then they can cut something else to accomplish that goal.

    By the way, I agree with the article's premise.
  18. Mrs.PatsFanInVa

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    #11 Jersey

    Or they can, (novel idea here) raise taxes to pay for it.
  19. Mrs.PatsFanInVa

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    #11 Jersey

    My bad.......
  20. patsfan13

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    Sharia in NJ don't be silly, or maybe not?


    Thankfully this judge was overturned this time.

    Good article on this issue from Andrew McCarthy:

    Christie’s

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