Welcome to PatsFans.com

Questions for Dr. Emile A. Nakhleh on the CIA and the Iraq War

Discussion in 'Political Discussion' started by DarrylS, Sep 22, 2006.

  1. DarrylS

    DarrylS PatsFans.com Supporter PatsFans.com Supporter

    Joined:
    Sep 13, 2004
    Messages:
    40,837
    Likes Received:
    90
    Ratings:
    +151 / 3 / -19

    "Dr. Emile A. Nakhleh served in the CIA for 15 years and retired on June 30, 2006, as the Director of the Political Islam Strategic Analysis Program, the intelligence community's premier group dedicated to the issue of political Islam. His research has focused on political Islam, political and educational reform, regime stability, and governance in the greater Middle East. "

    This interview is from Harper's... we already know this but substantiates our knowledge:

    http://harpers.org/sb-six-questions-emile-nakhleh-1158706094.html

    2. What accounts for the failure of American policy in Iraq?

    The main reason for our failure in Iraq was not looking at the “morning after.†It was obvious that the military campaign would succeed, but there was also an ideological view among some administration officials that we would be received as liberators. Those people did not understand that just because the Iraqis hated Saddam, that didn't mean they would like our occupation.

    Iraq was more complex than just Saddam. We should have learned from the experience of the British in the 1920s, when modern Iraq was created—namely, that bringing in outside leaders would not work. People expressed views about the need to plan for a post-Saddam Iraq, about the potential for sectarian violence and the rise of militias, about the fact that the Shiites would want to rise politically. These were not minority views in the intelligence community, but the administration ended up listening to other voices. The focus was on invading Iraq and getting rid of Saddam, and after that everything would be fine and dandy.

    5. What is the likely political fallout from the Iraqi debacle and from the failures of the “war on terrorism�

    We've lost a generation of goodwill in the Muslim world. The President's democratization and reform program for the Middle East has all but disappeared, except for official rhetoric. That was the centerpiece of the President's policies for the region, and now no one is talking about it. We have lost credibility across the Islamic world regarding “democracy†and “representative government†and “justice.†We are devising new rules and regulations for holding people without charge. The FBI has been at Guantanamo for years, and no charges have been brought against anyone. The Islamic world says “you talk about human rights, but you're holding people without charging them.†The Islamic world has always viewed the war on terror as a war on Islam and we have not been able to disabuse them of that notion. Because of Guantanamo, Abu Ghraib, and other abuses we have lost on the concepts of justice, fairness and the rule of law, and that's the heart of the American idea. That's very serious, and that's where I see the danger in the years ahead.

    6. Is there an inherent threat to Western democracies from the Islamic world?

    No, there's only a threat from those who use Islam for ideological reasons and who are willing to employ violence. There are 1.4 billion people in the Islamic world and only a tiny minority, maybe 2 or 3 percent, are politically active. Just like Jews and Christians, most have kids to raise and bills to pay. Most view Islam as a personal and societal force, not a political one, and only a tiny minority becomes terrorists. There are hundreds of political parties in the Muslim world, in Indonesia, Malaysia, Bahrain, Kuwait, Morocco, Yemen, Pakistan, Nigeria, Pakistan, and Bangladesh. Those parties and their supporters have participated in many elections, and some times they have won and some times they have lost, but they have largely recognized the results. Not all are necessarily interested in creating Sharia societies. Even Hamas highlighted its opposition to Israel and service to society, not religious issues. Political Islam is not a threat—the threat is if people become disenchanted with the political process and democracy, and opt for violence. There is a real danger from a few terrorists and we should go after them, but the longer-term threat is that people opt out of the system. We need to not only speak out in favor of democracy and political reform, but also act on that as well.
  2. Real World

    Real World Moderator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Aug 15, 2006
    Messages:
    26,728
    Likes Received:
    124
    Ratings:
    +248 / 3 / -2

    Question #2

    I'd agree with his opinion that the post war plan was flawed. I do think the Admin thoguht that the people of Iraq would be more receptive. I think the dismantling of the Army was the biggest mistake made. De-Baathification wasn't as big an issue as Ba'athists were scumbags. Maybe they could have weeded the evil do'ers from the orders followers, but the Army was the biggest mistake. However, I think his point about the 1920's is a stretch. Look at Europe, Japan, Asia, even our own country in the 1920's and you see an entirely different world with entirely different ideologies. What failed in the 1920's in Germany certainly didn't mean that Germany could never be reformed in the 1940's. But I do agree that the post war plan clearly could have been better.

    Question #3

    Um, we've lost a generation of good will in the muslim world? WTF is this clown talking about? Which generation would that be anyway? The generation that overran and held hostage our Embassy in Iran in '79, or the one that bombed our UN mandated Marine peacekeepers in Lebanon murdering over 200 GI's? Maybe he means the good will of liberating Kuwait, and saving SA. That good will was rewarded with two embassy bombing, hundreds dead, a barracks bombing in '96 (19 dead), the US cole (17 dead), and of course 2 WTC attacks, 3,000 dead. That's some good will eh?

    I do agree with him on Guantanamo. It's been 5 years since 9/11. The "grace" period one would expect from such an attack has come and gone. I think the world would probably have looked a blind eye to holding these people right after 9/11, but holding them 5 years later without any form of due process is inexcusable. I agree with him entirely here.

    We've lost credibility with respect to democracy accross the muslim world? Say what? 12 million people voted in Iraq. TWELVE MILLION! Hello. What planet is this guy on? We've brought democracy to the middle east. I hope this guy isn't one of those tardo's that says "well, they have democratic elections in Iran" like some people try to tell me. HA! Too funny.


    6. Is there an inherent threat to Western democracies from the Islamic world?

    No, there's only a threat from those who use Islam for ideological reasons and who are willing to employ violence. There are 1.4 billion people in the Islamic world and only a tiny minority, maybe 2 or 3 percent, are politically active. Just like Jews and Christians, most have kids to raise and bills to pay. Most view Islam as a personal and societal force, not a political one, and only a tiny minority becomes terrorists. There are hundreds of political parties in the Muslim world, in Indonesia, Malaysia, Bahrain, Kuwait, Morocco, Yemen, Pakistan, Nigeria, Pakistan, and Bangladesh. Those parties and their supporters have participated in many elections, and some times they have won and some times they have lost, but they have largely recognized the results. Not all are necessarily interested in creating Sharia societies. Even Hamas highlighted its opposition to Israel and service to society, not religious issues. Political Islam is not a threat—the threat is if people become disenchanted with the political process and democracy, and opt for violence.



    This boggles my mind. There is no threat from islam? At first I thought the framing of the question, a threat to western democracies, was made in order to recieve a beneficial reply. Then I read his response 3 times. Wow. Say what? How many of the 1.4 Billion muslims in the world live in a true democracy, and not under an oppressive regime? That there are "political" parties means nothing. It is the political system that needs to be considered. Hamas & Hezbollah are political parties, there are political parties in Iran, what does that mean? Nothing. So this guy needs to reevealuate his thinking. That Wahabiism is taught in Pakistan, Saudi Arabia, Iran, Yemen, etc...and that Sharia law is practiced throughout the muslim world in some cpacity, should be pointed out. Were there 3 out of 100 christian nations firebombing the world, we wouldn't be pointing to the 97 peaceful ones, we'd be concerned with the 3 that were aiding and abedding murder accross the globe.

    I can't fathom how this guy can even hint at defending Hamas. Hamas isn't concerned with religion, and is only opposed to Isreal? HELLO? They are opposed to Israel because of RELIGOUS TERRITORY. Wow, this guy worked in the CIA and had these conclusions? Scary stuff. Political islam is not a threat was written in the same sentence as Hamas. Wow.
  3. DarrylS

    DarrylS PatsFans.com Supporter PatsFans.com Supporter

    Joined:
    Sep 13, 2004
    Messages:
    40,837
    Likes Received:
    90
    Ratings:
    +151 / 3 / -19

    Here is his background,

    Dr. Emile A. Nakhleh served in the CIA for 15 years and retired on June 30, 2006, as the Director of the Political Islam Strategic Analysis Program, the intelligence community's premier group dedicated to the issue of political Islam

    I do not not know how you can dispute it, I assume an 15 year CIA analyst might have a different knowledge base than you or I.
  4. DarrylS

    DarrylS PatsFans.com Supporter PatsFans.com Supporter

    Joined:
    Sep 13, 2004
    Messages:
    40,837
    Likes Received:
    90
    Ratings:
    +151 / 3 / -19

    Apparently he is thought of rather highly in some circles...

    http://harpers.org/sb-six-questions-emile-nakhleh-1158706094.html

    Posted on Wednesday, September 20, 2006. Dr. Emile A. Nakhleh served in the CIA for 15 years and retired on June 30, 2006, as the Director of the Political Islam Strategic Analysis Program, the intelligence community's premier group dedicated to the issue of political Islam. His research has focused on political Islam, political and educational reform, regime stability, and governance in the greater Middle East. Nakhleh was awarded several senior intelligence commendation medals, including the Director's Medal and the Distinguished Career Intelligence Medal. He is also a member of the Council on Foreign Relations. While at the CIA, Nakhleh briefed the “highest policymakersâ€â€”he is not allowed to identify them by name—on issues related to the war on terrorism. In 2002, he traveled to the Guantanamo Bay prison and interviewed numerous detainees over the course of an 11-day stay. Before joining the CIA he worked as a university professor for a quarter-century, and in that capacity traveled widely in the Arab world, including Iraq. I recently interviewed Nakhleh and asked him about Iraq and the Bush Administration's “war on terrorism.†This is the first interview he has granted since leaving the CIA. By Ken Silverstein.
  5. Harry Boy

    Harry Boy Look Up, It's Amazing PatsFans.com Supporter

    Joined:
    Nov 10, 2005
    Messages:
    38,831
    Likes Received:
    119
    Ratings:
    +295 / 1 / -7

    No threat from Islam :singing: :singing: :singing:

    They were dancing in the streets all over the world when they saw the people jumping out of the Tower windows flapping their arms and trying to fly.
  6. Real World

    Real World Moderator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Aug 15, 2006
    Messages:
    26,728
    Likes Received:
    124
    Ratings:
    +248 / 3 / -2

    Excuse me? I'm confused. I do understand the individual worked for the CIA. However, I don't quite know what it is I'm not supposed to dispute. Is it his conclusions? Are you implying that he is privy to info I am not, and therefore I should concede to his conclusions and the logic used to aquire them, or are you trying to say that he is an "expert" and therefore my opinion is irrelevent or wrong? Please explain.
  7. Real World

    Real World Moderator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Aug 15, 2006
    Messages:
    26,728
    Likes Received:
    124
    Ratings:
    +248 / 3 / -2


    I don't doubt that he is highly regarded in some circles. He seems to be well educated, was a professor, and did work for the CIA as an analyst of sorts for quite some time. None of those facts require me to agree with his assumptions. I'm sure we could find a similar individual with similar standing within the CIA that would offer a contrarian assesment than that of Dr. Emile. I happen to agree with some of his points, but disagree immeasurably with others.

Share This Page

unset ($sidebar_block_show); ?>