Welcome to PatsFans.com

Post Traumatic Disorder and Purple Hearts..

Discussion in 'Political Discussion' started by DarrylS, May 20, 2008.

  1. DarrylS

    DarrylS PatsFans.com Supporter PatsFans.com Supporter

    Joined:
    Sep 13, 2004
    Messages:
    41,768
    Likes Received:
    180
    Ratings:
    +362 / 11 / -27

    Figured that this topic needed a separate topic in an attempt to discuss intelligently.. there has been mention by gates about the possibility of including PTSDT for determing eligibility for Purple Hearts.. as much as I believe that in war people are seriously effected by the stress of combat I am not sure it fits this category.. Whether it be my neighbour who got 5 silver stars in WWII and still has a difficult time talking about liberating the concentration camps or my friends from Viet Nam who are still having nightmares, for the most part people seem to be able to function.. not sure how you acknowledge invisible scars..

    The criteria for determining PTSDT, the DSM IV is not available on line, so this criteria is pretty close to what I remember..although it is from wikipedia.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Posttraumatic_stress_disorder

    When you read this the possibility of fraud and misuse becomes obvious.. there is a lot of room for interpretation.. consider a soldier who comes from a long history of physical abuse and other horrors... when he goes to war is the PTSDT from war or did war trigger the underlying issues.. in reality some folks witness years of horrific happenings and do ok, others witness one or two things and they become basket cases.

    This issue also raises other salient issues, i.e. first responders, police, correctional officers, firemen etc. All will witness traumatic events, probably most will have nightmares and some will have experience marital or other issues.. should all of these people receive rewards for doing what is expected??

    The Army times has an interesting discussion about the whole Purple Heart for PTSDT..

    http://www.armytimes.com/news/2008/05/army_purpleptsd_051908w/

    In reality traumatic events go with the turf for so many people, while some wind up catatonic... most of us just carry on.. it is part of the job.. maybe it is something they should talk more about before people enlist, this will happen to you, women and children will be killed, your buddies will die and get maimed and you will see stuff that is beyond anything you could ever imagine..
    Last edited: May 20, 2008
  2. wistahpatsfan

    wistahpatsfan Rookie

    Joined:
    Jul 30, 2005
    Messages:
    15,675
    Likes Received:
    11
    Ratings:
    +13 / 0 / -1

    #75 Jersey

    If you aren't bright enough to know about the possibility of going to war when you enlist and the ensuing possibilities of injuries and death, then not only should you not be enlisting, then you probably have the functioning maturity of an eight year-old. You should be in an institution or under 24/7 care at home - not in the military.

    PDSD has always been a tough subject for me to understand, and I think you've hit on a very interesting topic, here. Can't wait for some of the bloodletting on this one. My uncle did two tours in Nam (82nd Airborn) and he got two purple hearts and never spoke about his time. He is an extremely level guy - no stress or wierd behaviors and is considered the rock of the family - who has nightmares about Nam 40 years later. His brother is a complete paranoid dillusional nut job who joined the Guard and effectively dodged service. I know this is merely anecdotal, but it demonstrates one of a thousand dynamics that can result from trauma or lack thereof.

    I agree that PTSD is hard- if not impossible to isolate from a person's entire lifetime of experiences. Abusive upbringings can certainly lay the foundations of a lifetime of PTSD and dysfunction. This is just one of the reasons why I don't think a Purple Heart is warranted by PTSD, IMO.

    The Pentagon needs to begin treating the results of PTSD and many other injuries and ailments suffered by it's soldiers instead of putting a purple bandaid on the issue of how they disregard the problems of returning troops. It's a cheap out. Im sure a soldier with PTSD would trade a dozen Purple Hearts for good care and treatment when they get home.
    Last edited: May 20, 2008
  3. DarrylS

    DarrylS PatsFans.com Supporter PatsFans.com Supporter

    Joined:
    Sep 13, 2004
    Messages:
    41,768
    Likes Received:
    180
    Ratings:
    +362 / 11 / -27

    I agree wistah, know a lot of vets who are my contemporaries, some glorify it, some minimize what they did, some will never talk about it and some are chasing buterflies.. not sure how to resolve it, maybe post combat services are critical along with education for the returning warrior and the family.. it is aun unfortunate by product of war..
  4. otis p. driftwood

    otis p. driftwood Rookie

    Joined:
    Feb 4, 2008
    Messages:
    5,271
    Likes Received:
    4
    Ratings:
    +4 / 0 / -0

    There's more to it than just the "purple bandaid". By officially ...what's the word...brain not working...recognizing the problem it becomes more easy to get treatment if warranted or desired. This is what I posted in the other thread discussing it, it's from ThinkProgress.com. Too many people look at various mental issues, from depression to PTSD as some sort of weakness, which makes it very hard for a person to seek treatment--either they wind up thinking less of themselves or they're afraid their buddies will.

    As someone who's been diagnosed with PTSD by three separate medical people, for something that happened to me in childhood that I still can't remember, I can attest to the...stigma involved.

    So a purple heart would allow a guy to seek treatment for his wound without suffering that, right?
  5. Wildo7

    Wildo7 Totally Full of It

    Joined:
    Oct 1, 2007
    Messages:
    8,852
    Likes Received:
    34
    Ratings:
    +39 / 2 / -0

    I'm actually stunned that the arguments posted here so far aren't reversed. I agree 100% with you. I also think that it's natural to be somewhat traumatized by warlike situations which are, for lack of a better word, traumatic, whether you're prepared to go to war or not.

    And I think that the stigma around mental health issues is so strong that it masks the problem and makes it worse. I'm in now way suggesting that PatsNutMe has PTSD or anything like that, but you can see the "weakness" stigma involved when he was honestly offended by the suggestion that many soldiers suffer from it after war.

    I know older members of my family that would have diagnosed clinical depression if they could ever "swallow their pride" and see someone a doctor about it. Luckily I think this situation is changing albeit slowly.

    Purple hearts for PTSD? I don't know about that, and I don't really care to be honest. I do think the military should create an environment where soldiers that suffer from it feel encouraged to deal with it, but I suspect that the fear that this would somehow make it easier for soldiers to get out of combat or weaken the rest of the soldiers will keep the stigma alive.
  6. otis p. driftwood

    otis p. driftwood Rookie

    Joined:
    Feb 4, 2008
    Messages:
    5,271
    Likes Received:
    4
    Ratings:
    +4 / 0 / -0

    I don't know this, of course, but in years past wars were almost...cleaner...does that make sense? Not saying war is a picnic at all, please don't get me wrong, what I mean is that now, fighting an enemy like al Queda (not dissimilar from the tactics the Viet Cong used) takes more of a toll on soldiers--the not knowing who to trust, having to come to grips with maybe having to machine gun a woman or a child because they're carrying bombs, things like that, would have a much more profound affect on someone than having to simply fight men dressed in different colors than you're wearing.

    Again, not to minimize the horror of any war at all--I know an old guy who to this day hates Germans with a passion, simply because as he was laying on the bluff overlooking Omaha Beach, in a shell crater with his squad dead and dying around him, he with his leg shattered from the knee down, a German liutenant came by and shot each man in the head, just to be sure. The only reason he survived it is because the bullet skidded around his skull.
  7. DarrylS

    DarrylS PatsFans.com Supporter PatsFans.com Supporter

    Joined:
    Sep 13, 2004
    Messages:
    41,768
    Likes Received:
    180
    Ratings:
    +362 / 11 / -27

    Not sure a purple heart would facilitate tx, it usually will manifest itself in work situations, interpersonal situations.. maybe all soldiers who have seen combat should be followed up by a qualified screener at six month intervals for at least a two year period.. but prior to something like that happening as was suggested by A. Paul, there needs to be a reduction in stigma associated with such an intervention. When I lived in maine used to do some work with the mental health association(name escapes me) with working on the reduction of the stigma of mental illness in rural maine.. talk about a difficult task..
  8. otis p. driftwood

    otis p. driftwood Rookie

    Joined:
    Feb 4, 2008
    Messages:
    5,271
    Likes Received:
    4
    Ratings:
    +4 / 0 / -0

    God. No kidding. Nothing against rural Maine...but wow.

Share This Page

unset ($sidebar_block_show); ?>