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NFL and Pain.. painkillers also.

Discussion in 'NFL Football Forum' started by DarrylS, Aug 19, 2012.

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  1. DarrylS

    DarrylS PatsFans.com Supporter PatsFans.com Supporter

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    Interesting article in the Minneapolic Star Tribune about the effects of pain, pain killers and the need to be on the field if you want to keep your job. Jim Kleinsasser provides interesting information to the reporter about what it takes to stay on the field.. recognizing that if you do get hurt, Tuesday next they will have a replacement for you working out.

    In the hubbub of the pending season we often forget the personal toll that this game takes on their bodies.. and because they get paid very well their pain is often dismissed or minimized.. but it is a very real part of the NFL.

    What are the 3 most common words in the NFL.. "Walk it off" or the Marine Corps code, "Pain is Weakness Leaving the Body"..

    NFL and pain: Fleeting glory, bodies past repair | StarTribune.com

    Apparently there are lawsuits pending..

    http://www.nytimes.com/2011/12/06/s...ed-by-ex-players-over-painkiller-toradol.html
  2. Gwedd

    Gwedd PatsFans.com Supporter PatsFans.com Supporter

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    #61 Jersey

    A similar culture in the military. Tylenol was known as "Ranger Candy" and even back in the dark ages when I was serving, I didn't know anyone on flight status who didn't have 3 things in one of his flight suit pockets: Advil/Aspirin, Tums, and No-Doze. No one wanted to be known as a slacker in any sort of a way and the attitude was akin to the "suck it up" or "rub some dirt on it" mentality in sports.

    When my son was in Afghanistan (and also when back off deployment) he always carried the same things I did: Advil/Tums/No-doze or their equivalent. Many times there were guys with stronger pain meds, or even getting a cortisone shot and wraps on ankles, and other joints.

    I don't have an answer as I don't see these cultures changing anytime soon, if ever.
  3. MoLewisrocks

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    I'm calling BS on Mr. Horn's contention that if only he'd known...

    There's this thing called the internet and players seem to know how to use it for self promotion and these guys all have their own PC docs outside of the game NOT TO MENTION A UNION LOOKING OUT FOR THEM. This is another case of players doing whatever it takes (and their association feigning a blind eye to facilitate that) to keep taking the field and collecting those checks and then wanting to blame someone else for whatever transpires as a result. The alternative is eliminate pain killers and cut anyone who can't answer the bell or suffers a concussion (even though lots of folks who did and do never experience the level of difficulty some are now anticipating or find ways to deal with it that mitigate much of it). And believe me, these players and their union would die before signing off on that concept, too.

    Toradol is used for lots of muscle/ligament and soft tissue injuries. Tommy took it before that first superbowl, and possibly several other times when the alternative was not playing and the damage was essentially done (either needing rest or surgery post season). They don't inject it for concussion symptoms unless you're lying to them about what ails you...

    I'm beginning to think for some of these recent retirees suing the league is becoming a way of staying relevant and getting even with the physically demanding industry that ultimately had to part company with you because you aged out.

    Ketorolac - PubMed Health
  4. DarrylS

    DarrylS PatsFans.com Supporter PatsFans.com Supporter

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    There is also awareness that the need to be on the field starts with the first introduction into football, and increases into College.. so the NFL is not the sole culprit.. it is the game, the players, the culture and the need to put a marketable product on the field..

    The secondary issue is that once you are in the limelight it is difficult to let it go, and many of these kids want to extend their time in the NFL as the after life is not as secure or glamorous as the NFL is.
  5. MoLewisrocks

    MoLewisrocks PatsFans.com Supporter PatsFans.com Supporter

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    The Tribune seems to be doing a series on painkillers and this is a follow up. The league is contemplating banning Toradol as soon as this season. As is often the case with drugs, the risks and side effects aren't fully realized for decades because they are approved for the market in years following minimal testing for limited or controlled use. Of course the fallout will be increasing absences and/or increased illegal or self medication and ultimately shorter careers.

    NFL and pain: League zeros in on one pain medication | StarTribune.com
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