Welcome to PatsFans.com

Gallop: Record high says U.S. invasion a mistake

Discussion in 'Political Discussion' started by PressCoverage, Apr 24, 2008.

  1. PressCoverage

    PressCoverage Banned

    Joined:
    Sep 25, 2005
    Messages:
    8,609
    Likes Received:
    13
    Ratings:
    +13 / 0 / -0

    Record high 63 percent say U.S. made a mistake in sending troops to Iraq.
    ...

    A new USA Today/Gallup poll found that 63 percent of Americans say “the United States made a mistake in sending troops to Iraq, a new high mark by one percentage point.” Gallup notes that “majority opposition to the Iraq war is basically cemented.”

    [​IMG]

    Gallup adds, “The new high in Iraq war opposition is also notable because it is the highest ‘mistake’ percentage Gallup has ever measured for an active war involving the United States — surpassing by two points the 61% who said the Vietnam War was a mistake in May 1971.” (HT: Dan Froomkin)
  2. wistahpatsfan

    wistahpatsfan Rookie

    Joined:
    Jul 30, 2005
    Messages:
    15,675
    Likes Received:
    11
    Ratings:
    +13 / 0 / -1

    #75 Jersey

    37% of Americans think it wasn't a friggin mistake?

    JEEZIZ H KRYSTE!
  3. weswelker#83

    weswelker#83 Rookie

    Joined:
    Dec 13, 2007
    Messages:
    4,540
    Likes Received:
    9
    Ratings:
    +12 / 0 / -0

    Bush is a mistake or an election fraud ?

    :bricks:
  4. reflexblue

    reflexblue PatsFans.com Supporter PatsFans.com Supporter

    Joined:
    Aug 11, 2006
    Messages:
    17,346
    Likes Received:
    47
    Ratings:
    +130 / 4 / -0

    #91 Jersey

    Maybe they're to busy tring to get out of debt to really think about it. When you're losing you're home wheather the war was a mistake or not prolly isn't a high priority.
  5. Stokes

    Stokes Rookie

    Joined:
    Sep 1, 2006
    Messages:
    2,423
    Likes Received:
    1
    Ratings:
    +1 / 0 / -0

    Although the margin of error means that there really isn't s statistically significant difference from a year ago. I know that's not the point though, just thought I'd point out that the "change" or "record high" is really a non-story. Maybe more appropriate is the fact that military and political gains since the surge have not helped at all in the court of public opinion.
  6. Stokes

    Stokes Rookie

    Joined:
    Sep 1, 2006
    Messages:
    2,423
    Likes Received:
    1
    Ratings:
    +1 / 0 / -0

    Well you could still have a bunch of people that agreed with the mission but are horrified by the planning or lack thereof. Those people may still say we should have gone, but gone with some kind of plan other than the Iraqis will be celebrating in the streets once we get there, and that's it.
  7. wistahpatsfan

    wistahpatsfan Rookie

    Joined:
    Jul 30, 2005
    Messages:
    15,675
    Likes Received:
    11
    Ratings:
    +13 / 0 / -1

    #75 Jersey


    And that's better ...how? :confused:
  8. Real World

    Real World Moderator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Aug 15, 2006
    Messages:
    27,099
    Likes Received:
    216
    Ratings:
    +509 / 6 / -2

    Who the F cares? It's a fricken poll. George Bush once had 90% approval ratings from the same pool of people.
  9. PressCoverage

    PressCoverage Banned

    Joined:
    Sep 25, 2005
    Messages:
    8,609
    Likes Received:
    13
    Ratings:
    +13 / 0 / -0

    What political gains?
  10. Stokes

    Stokes Rookie

    Joined:
    Sep 1, 2006
    Messages:
    2,423
    Likes Received:
    1
    Ratings:
    +1 / 0 / -0

    No no, not saying its better, just trying to explain how anyone could possibly say it wasn't a mistake after seeing the horrible results. I'm guessing that if you change the question to something about the way in which the war has been handled that number drops significantly.
  11. apple strudel

    apple strudel Banned

    Joined:
    Mar 15, 2008
    Messages:
    5,894
    Likes Received:
    7
    Ratings:
    +7 / 0 / -0


    Well, if for no other reason, it's certainly important if the polled group represents the voters in November. 2 out of 3 candidates support the war.
  12. Stokes

    Stokes Rookie

    Joined:
    Sep 1, 2006
    Messages:
    2,423
    Likes Received:
    1
    Ratings:
    +1 / 0 / -0

    There've been a few things accomplished since the surge began, I'll be the first to admit there's still a loooooong way to go though, and no guarantee that the whole thing won't collapse. Also I got lazy so this is only a wikipedia link:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Iraq_W...raq.27s_political_system_and_Iraq.27s_economy

    "On December 2, 2007, the Sunni Arab Accordance Front called for the end to their boycott of the Iraq Parliament.[88] On January 20, 2008, Iraq's parliament passed a law to let members of the Ba’ath party return to public life, a major U.S. congressional benchmark for the success of Iraqi government.[89]"

    "The envoy, Staffan de Mistura, said he would present a positive picture of progress in Iraq in a report to the UN Security Council despite earlier serious misgivings. He said, "At the beginning of [2007]... we were genuinely concerned by the lack of progress on national dialogue, today that has substantially changed. It has changed our mind from being worried or from being pessimistic." The UN report would, he said, "compliment" Iraq's government on its work at fostering reconciliation.[91]"

    "In January 2008, Council of Foreign Relations fellow Michael O'Hanlon stated that "Overall, Iraq's political system probably merits a grade of roughly C for its performance over the last 12 months."[92] He also stated that "the pace of progress is finally picking up."[92]"

    "On February 13, 2008, the Iraqi parliament passed three legislative issue that were considered contentious. The three measures were an amnesty law, a law that defines the scope of provincial powers, and the budget for 2008. The amnesty law was one of the benchmarks set by president Bush. The provincial powers law includes a provision for provincial elections, another key benchmark. And the budget should pave the way for the creation of up to 700,000 new jobs for Iraqis.[93]"

    The most solid evidence of gains are the actual issues taken up by the Iraqis, you can take or leave the commentary in these excerpts. As one other one I'd take the decision by a shia prime minister to go after a shia radical group (al Sadr's men) as another good sign politically.
  13. apple strudel

    apple strudel Banned

    Joined:
    Mar 15, 2008
    Messages:
    5,894
    Likes Received:
    7
    Ratings:
    +7 / 0 / -0

    This is not necessarily attributable to the surge. Correlation != causation. It's becoming more clear that any gains in Iraq lately have more likely been due to the Al-Sadr cease fire.
  14. Stokes

    Stokes Rookie

    Joined:
    Sep 1, 2006
    Messages:
    2,423
    Likes Received:
    1
    Ratings:
    +1 / 0 / -0

    The sunni awakening was a pretty big deal too. You're right though, the 2 are not necessarily related, I was just saying that those things had been done since the surge started (so same timeframe if not related), and those gains have not helped public opinion (basically zero change in opinion since Jan '07).
  15. apple strudel

    apple strudel Banned

    Joined:
    Mar 15, 2008
    Messages:
    5,894
    Likes Received:
    7
    Ratings:
    +7 / 0 / -0

    Fair enough.
  16. Real World

    Real World Moderator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Aug 15, 2006
    Messages:
    27,099
    Likes Received:
    216
    Ratings:
    +509 / 6 / -2

    I don't think it is. Clearly anyone who's anti-war, is not going to vote for McCain. That being said, thinking the war was a mistake, and wanting an immediate withdrawl, are not one and the same. A lot of voters who do not like the war, do not want to leave precipitously. They want us to leave as soon as possible, but only when it makes the most sense.
  17. wistahpatsfan

    wistahpatsfan Rookie

    Joined:
    Jul 30, 2005
    Messages:
    15,675
    Likes Received:
    11
    Ratings:
    +13 / 0 / -1

    #75 Jersey

    Made sense about 5 years ago. Still makes sense today.

    Don't argue with me, either. I'm just repeating myself more the older I get.:(
  18. Real World

    Real World Moderator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Aug 15, 2006
    Messages:
    27,099
    Likes Received:
    216
    Ratings:
    +509 / 6 / -2

    Welcome to the forum BTW.

    You need to read more than the daily MSM article. The surge has pacified the sunni insurgency, and incorporated those fighters into the government security structure. The result has been a drastic decline in both attacks, and casualties. Reconstruction in those area's is now possible as a result. Familes are moving back to the area, and the markets are beginning to bustle again. The sunni success, in conjunction with the Sadr ceasefire, has enabled the US to build up ISF strength, and therefore concentrate ops on the Mehdi Army. That's why you're seeing the action in Basra. To put it simply, the Sunni's, who questioned Malaki's objectivity (he's shia), has asked Malaki to prove he means business, since they're holding up their end of the bargain. So far, they're seeing that Malaki is serious about disbanding all militia's, as he's taking on a shia one. That's why the sunni's are coming back into the fold. Before, during the sectarian strife, pre-surge, sunni's didn't trust Malaki. It seems that they are beginning too now. Patience people. We all need to hope that this works out.
  19. Real World

    Real World Moderator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Aug 15, 2006
    Messages:
    27,099
    Likes Received:
    216
    Ratings:
    +509 / 6 / -2

    You're white right? That explains everything. Another typical angry old white neocon man. :p

Share This Page

unset ($sidebar_block_show); ?>