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Forklift Question

Discussion in 'The PatsFans.com Pub' started by Frezo, Feb 15, 2010.

  1. Frezo

    Frezo Rookie

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    #50 Jersey

    Today myself and three others passed a train the trainer course for forklift certification. Below is one of the test questions. How would you answer this?

    Q: Which is true for a counterbalance lift truck:
    "The higher the lift height...
    a) the higher the capacity"
    b) the lower the capacity"
    c) height does not effect capacity"

    Thanks
    Frezo
  2. KontradictioN

    KontradictioN Do you even lift? PatsFans.com Supporter

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    No Jersey Selected

    I've never operated a forklift, but I would think that height wouldn't effect capacity. Therefore, I'd be inclined to go with "C".
  3. reflexblue

    reflexblue PatsFans.com Supporter PatsFans.com Supporter

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    #91 Jersey

    Its a tricky question, the higher the forks the more likely to tip over. The center of balance changes, but thats not capacity. As i'm sure you know the capacity rating is on a plate attached to the fork lift. If the capacity is 3,000 lbs than the truck can lift 3,000 lbs and raise it as high as the forks can go, its just dangerous to drive around with that load or any with the forks raised.
  4. Michael

    Michael Moderator Staff Member PatsFans.com Supporter

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    #12 Jersey

    What kind of forklift are we talking about?
  5. Frezo

    Frezo Rookie

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    #50 Jersey

    It is a tricky question and I didn't like the way it was worded. During a training session capacity should only mean one thing, "the maximum load that a forklift can safely handle according to the capacity plate." It's a fixed number and should never be implied to be variable. This question suggests that. For example, an operator is in a forklift. He checks the capacity plate and sees, 2800 lbs at a 24" load center. He checks his load and finds it within spec. Does the capacity change as he raises the forks? It better not, especially if the lift is right at capacity. The rating has to be good for the entire vertical range of the mast. (tilt or dynamics not withstanding) Now the center of gravity might shift forward within the stability triangle, but capacity should not be used to indicate this. Capacity should only refer to one thing or issues can get confused.

    The main problem with the question is that it doesn't differentiate whether it is theoretical or practical. Theoretically speaking b) may be correct. Practically speaking c) is correct. IOW the lift may have a capacity of 3600 lbs at a 24" load center when 4" off the floor, but at full vertical extension may only handle 2800 lbs. This has no practical application though and IMO made the question misleading. The problems it imposes can be worse for attendees whose 2nd language may be English.

    BTW I selected c) while the instructor said b). That question was the only wrong answer on all 4 tests so I'm a bit agitated. I feel like a Jeopardy contestant arguing with Alex Trebeck during a commercial break. Rather than disrupt the timing of the session I didn't discuss it at the time, but am awaiting a email reply from the instructor about this.
  6. Frezo

    Frezo Rookie

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    #50 Jersey

    Class 1 Toyota
  7. Michael

    Michael Moderator Staff Member PatsFans.com Supporter

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    #12 Jersey

    That's what I was getting at.
  8. Frezo

    Frezo Rookie

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    #50 Jersey

    It's rated for 2800 lbs at a 24" load center and about 16' max vertical.
  9. reflexblue

    reflexblue PatsFans.com Supporter PatsFans.com Supporter

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    #91 Jersey

    The capacity Never changes, just the center of gravity. If you got outside the ''24 inches the capacity would be lower to to the fact that the center of gravity is no longer in line with the counter weight on the back of the fork lift. The higher you lifted the forks the more unstable the whole fork truck would become, but the ACTUAL capacity is still 2800 lbs. Your fork truck can raise 2800 lbs to a height of 16 feet as long as the load is centered
    Last edited: Feb 16, 2010
  10. Frezo

    Frezo Rookie

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    #50 Jersey

    Agreed. Capacity has to be viewed as a constant number to avoid operator confusion. If the question was trying to demonstrate theory, it didn't do a very good job.
  11. reflexblue

    reflexblue PatsFans.com Supporter PatsFans.com Supporter

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    #91 Jersey

    I guess another example would be the fork truck has a lift capacity of 2800 lbs. Lets say for example the load is 1800lbs and it was to far off to the right or left of the forks it would be a hazard. The higher it was lifted the more the center of gravity would shift and the more unstable the platform would become. Its a whole nother question.
    Last edited: Feb 15, 2010
  12. reflexblue

    reflexblue PatsFans.com Supporter PatsFans.com Supporter

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    #91 Jersey

    If you a further explanation try the American Society of Mechanical Engineers. Or A.S.M.E for short.
  13. Frezo

    Frezo Rookie

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    #50 Jersey

    To finish this, (hate to leave you all hanging in suspense), ;)

    The instructor said the question was important because we had taken the course for class 1, 3 and 4 forklifts. Class 3 and 4 will sometimes include older lifts that have a capacity plate that has different load ratings for different heights. He felt it was necessary that we understood why. Manufacturers stopped making lifts this way long ago, but it's still possible to come accross one.
  14. Real World

    Real World Moderator Staff Member

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    As Roman Maronie once said, That's a fargin treek question!

    [​IMG]


    When I got my hydrolics license, the dude that adminstered the test, gave it to me and a cooworker, in his office. He ripped up my test after I handed it to him, and told me to "shut the **** up, and sit down". Sheesh I thought, I failed. 10 minutes later he walked over with a class 2B, and 1A license. Nice!

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