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Discussion in 'Political Discussion' started by patsfan13, May 27, 2010.

  1. patsfan13

    patsfan13 Hall of Fame Poster PatsFans.com Supporter

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    Oldest Medal of Honor recipient from WWII dies


    Lt John Finn just passed away today . He was our country's oldest living Medal of Honor winner.

    Oldest Medal of Honor recipient from WWII dies - Yahoo! News

    John's Medal of Honor Citation:
    Citation
    For extraordinary heroism distinguished service, and devotion above and beyond the call of duty. During the first attack by Japanese airplanes on the Naval Air Station, Kaneohe Bay, on 7 December 1941, Lt. Finn promptly secured and manned a .50-caliber machinegun mounted on an instruction stand in a completely exposed section of the parking ramp, which was under heavy enemy machinegun strafing fire. Although painfully wounded many times, he continued to man this gun and to return the enemy's fire vigorously and with telling effect throughout the enemy strafing and bombing attacks and with complete disregard for his own personal safety. It was only by specific orders that he was persuaded to leave his post to seek medical attention. Following first aid treatment, although obviously suffering much pain and moving with great difficulty, he returned to the squadron area and actively supervised the rearming of returning planes. His extraordinary heroism and conduct in this action were in keeping with the highest traditions of the U.S. Naval Service.



    This weekend spare a thought for those who gave their lives to protect you and your families.
     
  2. chicowalker

    chicowalker Pro Bowl Player

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    Thanks for posting this.
     
  3. Wolfpack

    Wolfpack Banned

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    Amen, and may Lt. Finn rest in peace. I hope he is reunited this very moment with his old buddies and comrades in arms.
     
  4. wistahpatsfan

    wistahpatsfan Pro Bowl Player

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    #75 Jersey

    Amazing! Great post. Thanks!
     
  5. 363839

    363839 PatsFans.com Supporter PatsFans.com Supporter

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    That is just incredible.
    What courage this man had.
    Rest in peace, Soldier.
     
  6. JackBauer

    JackBauer Pro Bowl Player

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    Good post. One day I read MoH citations on Wikipedia as some of them are actually quite interesting. This is probably the most amazing one I ever found: Roy Benavidez - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    It's long, I know, but well worth reading for a true profile in courage.

     
    Last edited: May 28, 2010
  7. patsfan13

    patsfan13 Hall of Fame Poster PatsFans.com Supporter

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    Great post Jack, he was a man to be admired.
     
  8. apple strudel

    apple strudel Banned

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    I'm going to go ahead and take the opportunity to point out that while individuals act heroically for many nations, I'd far prefer said heroism fighting against empires rather than for them.

    3...2...1... until PF13 deletes this post and bans me from his pet thread!
     
  9. patsfan13

    patsfan13 Hall of Fame Poster PatsFans.com Supporter

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    A Medal of Honor winner from Keene NH:


    *DILBOY, GEORGE

    Rank and organization: Private First Class, U.S. Army, Company H, 103d Infantry, 26th Division. Place and date: Near Belleau, France, 18 July 1918. Entered service at: Keene, N.H. Birth: Greece. G.O. No.: 13, W.D., 1919. Citation: After his platoon had gained its objective along a railroad embankment, Pfc. Dilboy, accompanying his platoon leader to reconnoiter the ground beyond, was suddenly fired upon by an enemy machinegun from 100 yards. From a standing position on the railroad track, fully exposed to view, he opened fire at once, but failing to silence the gun, rushed forward with his bayonet fixed, through a wheat field toward the gun emplacement, falling within 25 yards of the gun with his right leg nearly severed above the knee and with several bullet holes in his body. With undaunted courage he continued to fire into the emplacement from a prone position, killing 2 of the enemy and dispersing the rest of the crew.
     
  10. patsfan13

    patsfan13 Hall of Fame Poster PatsFans.com Supporter

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    From Boston MA Medal of Honor Winner:

    O'CALLAHAN, JOSEPH TIMOTHY

    Rank and organization: Commander (Chaplain Corps), U.S. Naval Reserve, U.S.S. Franklin. Place and date: Near Kobe, Japan, 19 March 1945. Entered service at: Massachusetts. Born: 14 May 1904, Boston, Mass. Citation: For conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity at the risk of his life above and beyond the call of duty while serving as chaplain on board the U.S.S. Franklin when that vessel was fiercely attacked by enemy Japanese aircraft during offensive operations near Kobe, Japan, on 19 March 1945. A valiant and forceful leader, calmly braving the perilous barriers of flame and twisted metal to aid his men and his ship, Lt. Comdr. O'Callahan groped his way through smoke-filled corridors to the open flight deck and into the midst of violently exploding bombs, shells, rockets, and other armament. With the ship rocked by incessant explosions, with debris and fragments raining down and fires raging in ever-increasing fury, he ministered to the wounded and dying, comforting and encouraging men of all faiths; he organized and led firefighting crews into the blazing inferno on the flight deck; he directed the jettisoning of live ammunition and the flooding of the magazine; he manned a hose to cool hot, armed bombs rolling dangerously on the listing deck, continuing his efforts, despite searing, suffocating smoke which forced men to fall back gasping and imperiled others who replaced them. Serving with courage, fortitude, and deep spiritual strength, Lt. Comdr. O'Callahan inspired the gallant officers and men of the Franklin to fight heroically and with profound faith in the face of almost certain death and to return their stricken ship to port.


    724 men killed during the attack 200+ wounded, pic of what the Chaplin was working in:


    [​IMG]
     
  11. Patsfanin Philly

    Patsfanin Philly Experienced Starter w/First Big Contract

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    #95 Jersey

    In that same vein, a dentist who posthumously was awarded his medal 60 years later due to a belief that members of the medical corps weren't eligible..Thanks and G-d bless to all those who have served and especially those who have made the ultimate sacrifice...
    From wiki
    CAPTAIN BEN L. SALOMON
    UNITED STATES ARMY​
    For conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity at the risk of his life above and beyond the call of duty:
    Captain Ben L. Salomon was serving at Saipan, in the Marianas Islands on July 7, 1944, as the Surgeon for the 2nd Battalion, 105th Infantry Regiment, 27th Infantry Division. The Regiment’s 1st and 2d Battalions were attacked by an overwhelming force estimated between 3,000 and 5,000 Japanese soldiers. It was one of the largest attacks attempted in the Pacific Theater during World War II. Although both units fought furiously, the enemy soon penetrated the Battalions’ combined perimeter and inflicted overwhelming casualties. In the first minutes of the attack, approximately 30 wounded soldiers walked, crawled, or were carried into Captain Salomon’s aid station, and the small tent soon filled with wounded men. As the perimeter began to be overrun, it became increasingly difficult for Captain Salomon to work on the wounded. He then saw a Japanese soldier bayoneting one of the wounded soldiers lying near the tent. Firing from a squatting position, Captain Salomon quickly killed the enemy soldier. Then, as he turned his attention back to the wounded, two more Japanese soldiers appeared in the front entrance of the tent. As these enemy soldiers were killed, four more crawled under the tent walls. Rushing them, Captain Salomon kicked the knife out of the hand of one, shot another, and bayoneted a third. Captain Salomon butted the fourth enemy soldier in the stomach and a wounded comrade then shot and killed the enemy soldier. Realizing the gravity of the situation, Captain Salomon ordered the wounded to make their way as best they could back to the regimental aid station, while he attempted to hold off the enemy until they were clear. Captain Salomon then grabbed a rifle from one of the wounded and rushed out of the tent. After four men were killed while manning a machine gun, Captain Salomon took control of it. When his body was later found, 98 dead enemy soldiers were piled in front of his position. Captain Salomon’s extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty are in keeping with the highest traditions of military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
     
    Last edited: May 28, 2010
  12. patsfan13

    patsfan13 Hall of Fame Poster PatsFans.com Supporter

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    From NH Dick O'Kane:


    O'KANE, RICHARD HETHERINGTON

    Rank and organization: Commander, U.S. Navy, commanding U.S.S. Tang. Place and date: Vicinity Philippine Islands, 23 and 24 October 1944. Entered service at: New Hampshire. Born: 2 February 1911, Dover, N.H. Citation: For conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity at the risk of his life above and beyond the call of duty as commanding officer of the U.S.S. Tang operating against 2 enemy Japanese convoys on 23 and 24 October 1944, during her fifth and last war patrol. Boldly maneuvering on the surface into the midst of a heavily escorted convoy, Comdr. O'Kane stood in the fusillade of bullets and shells from all directions to launch smashing hits on 3 tankers, coolly swung his ship to fire at a freighter and, in a split-second decision, shot out of the path of an onrushing transport, missing it by inches. Boxed in by blazing tankers, a freighter, transport, and several destroyers, he blasted 2 of the targets with his remaining torpedoes and, with pyrotechnics bursting on all sides, cleared the area. Twenty-four hours later, he again made contact with a heavily escorted convoy steaming to support the Leyte campaign with reinforcements and supplies and with crated planes piled high on each unit. In defiance of the enemy's relentless fire, he closed the concentration of ship and in quick succession sent 2 torpedoes each into the first and second transports and an adjacent tanker, finding his mark with each torpedo in a series of violent explosions at less than l,000-yard range. With ships bearing down from all sides, he charged the enemy at high speed, exploding the tanker in a burst of flame, smashing the transport dead in the water, and blasting the destroyer with a mighty roar which rocked the Tang from stem to stern. Expending his last 2 torpedoes into the remnants of a once powerful convoy before his own ship went down, Comdr. O'Kane, aided by his gallant command, achieved an illustrious record of heroism in combat, enhancing the finest traditions of the U.S. Naval Service.




    He He was a tall man well over 6ft tall he weighed <90 lbs when rescued from a Japanee POW camp at the end of the war.
     
  13. patsfan13

    patsfan13 Hall of Fame Poster PatsFans.com Supporter

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    Think too of all the medics who went under fire to tend to the wounded and usually had no weapon to defend themselves with.


    Other feel free to post these stories on this thread.
     
  14. patsfan13

    patsfan13 Hall of Fame Poster PatsFans.com Supporter

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    A more recent hero:

    MURPHY, MICHAEL P.

    Rank and Organization: Lieutenant, United States Navy
    For conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity at the risk of his life above and beyond the call of duty as the leader of a special reconnaissance element with Naval Special Warfare Task Unit Afghanistan on 27 and 28 June 2005. While leading a mission to locate a high-level anti-coalition militia leader, Lieutenant Murphy demonstrated extraordinary heroism in the face of grave danger in the vicinity of Asadabad, Konar Province, Afghanistan. On 28 June 2005, operating in an extremely rugged enemy-controlled area, Lieutenant Murphy's team was discovered by anti-coalition militia sympathizers, who revealed their position to Taliban fighters. As a result, between 30 and 40 enemy fighters besieged his four-member team. Demonstrating exceptional resolve, Lieutenant Murphy valiantly led his men in engaging the large enemy force. The ensuing fierce firefight resulted in numerous enemy casualties, as well as the wounding of all four members of the team. Ignoring his own wounds and demonstrating exceptional composure, Lieutenant Murphy continued to lead and encourage his men. When the primary communicator fell mortally wounded, Lieutenant Murphy repeatedly attempted to call for assistance for his beleaguered teammates. Realizing the impossibility of communicating in the extreme terrain, and in the face of almost certain death, he fought his way into open terrain to gain a better position to transmit a call. This deliberate, heroic act deprived him of cover, exposing him to direct enemy fire. Finally achieving contact with his Headquarters, Lieutenant Murphy maintained his exposed position while he provided his location and requested immediate support for his team. In his final act of bravery, he continued to engage the enemy until he was mortally wounded, gallantly giving his life for his country and for the cause of freedom. By his selfless leadership, courageous actions, and extraordinary devotion to duty, Lieutenant Murphy reflected great credit upon himself and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.

     
  15. apple strudel

    apple strudel Banned

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    Accompanying a montage of photos of the Civil War to news media coverage on the present war in Iraq, the poetry and journal entries of Stafford are read, highlighting Stafford’s thoughtfully crafted pacifistic stance. “I can’t stop war, Jesus couldn’t stop war, Eisenhower couldn’t stop it,” Stafford said, but at least “I could decide there would be one person not in it.”



    ?Show me a good war?: William Stafford?s pacifism: News - - Pioneer Log - Student Groups - College of Arts and Sciences - Lewis & Clark
     
  16. apple strudel

    apple strudel Banned

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    Wilfred Owen [​IMG]
    Born 18 March 1893(1893-03-18)
    Oswestry, Shropshire, UK Died 4 November 1918 (aged 25)
    Sambre–Oise Canal, France Nationality British Period First World War Genres War poem
    Influences[show]


    Official website Wilfred Edward Salter Owen MC (18 March 1893 – 4 November 1918) was a British poet and soldier, and one of the leading poets of the First World War. His shocking, realistic war poetry on the horrors of trenches and gas warfare was heavily influenced by his friend Siegfried Sassoon and sat in stark contrast to both the public perception of war at the time, and to the confidently patriotic verse written earlier by war poets such as Rupert Brooke. Some of his best-known works—most of which were published posthumously—include "Dulce et Decorum Est", "Insensibility", "Anthem for Doomed Youth", "Futility" and "Strange Meeting". His preface intended for a book of poems to be published in 1919 contains numerous well-known phrases, especially "War, and the pity of War", and "the Poetry is in the pity".[1]


    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wilfred_Owen







    Bent double, like old beggars under sacks,
    Knock-kneed, coughing like hags, we cursed through sludge,
    Till on the haunting flares2 we turned our backs
    And towards our distant rest3 began to trudge.
    Men marched asleep. Many had lost their boots
    But limped on, blood-shod. All went lame; all blind;
    Drunk with fatigue; deaf even to the hoots4
    Of tired, outstripped5 Five-Nines6 that dropped behind.
    Gas!7 Gas! Quick, boys! – An ecstasy of fumbling,
    Fitting the clumsy helmets8 just in time;
    But someone still was yelling out and stumbling,
    And flound'ring like a man in fire or lime9 . . .
    Dim, through the misty panes10 and thick green light,
    As under a green sea, I saw him drowning.
    In all my dreams, before my helpless sight,
    He plunges at me, guttering,11 choking, drowning.
    If in some smothering dreams you too could pace
    Behind the wagon that we flung him in,
    And watch the white eyes writhing in his face,
    His hanging face, like a devil's sick of sin;
    If you could hear, at every jolt, the blood
    Come gargling from the froth-corrupted lungs,
    Obscene as cancer, bitter as the cud12
    Of vile, incurable sores on innocent tongues,
    My friend, you would not tell with such high zest13
    To children ardent14 for some desperate glory,
    The old Lie; Dulce et Decorum est
    Pro patria mori.15
     
    Last edited: May 28, 2010
  17. patsfan13

    patsfan13 Hall of Fame Poster PatsFans.com Supporter

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    We get it strudel, you hate soldiers and of course have never done anything yourself to defend the country, stop spamming this thread.
     
  18. PatsFanInVa

    PatsFanInVa PatsFans.com Supporter PatsFans.com Supporter

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    Ne obliviscarus, we should pause and remember the most decorated American hero of the Vietnam war, for all he did for his country, Joe Hooper:

    The most decorated veteran of the Vietnam War was Joe Hooper of Moses Lake, Washington. Hooper was awarded 35 medals, including the Congressional Medal of Honor, two Silver Stars, six Bronze Stars and eight Purple Hearts. His tally exceeds that of Murphy, York, Keene or Urban. Hooper's life after the war was filled with conflict and controversy which contributes to his being overlooked by many historians. Like the war itself which stirred up strong emotions and controversy, the most decorated veteran of that war was filled with controversies as well. One of the more controversial episodes was when he told a group of high school students,

    "I would tell my children, if I were to do this over, 'Go to Canada, don't fight.' Don't fight a war you can't win."

    His tragic life ended when he died of a brain hemorrhage at 40 years old. He was later interred at Arlington National Cemetery.


    Who Is the Most Decorated American War Hero?
     
  19. Patsfanin Philly

    Patsfanin Philly Experienced Starter w/First Big Contract

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    #95 Jersey


    Lawrence Joel was a medic and the first living African-American since the Spanish American war to earn the Medal of Honor. Big and Rich mentioned him and his actions in the their hit song, “8th of November”
    Big and Rich - 8th of November - Top Country Music Videos

    On March 9, 1967 on the White House lawn, President Lyndon Johnson presented Joel with the Medal of Honor for his service in the Vietnam War. His citation reads as follows:
    For conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity at the risk of life above and beyond the call of duty. Sp6c. Joel demonstrated indomitable courage, determination, and professional skill when a numerically superior and well-concealed Viet Cong element launched a vicious attack which wounded or killed nearly every man in the lead squad of the company. After treating the men wounded by the initial burst of gunfire, he bravely moved forward to assist others who were wounded while proceeding to their objective. While moving from man to man, he was struck in the right leg by machine gun fire. Although painfully wounded his desire to aid his fellow soldiers transcended all personal feeling. He bandaged his own wound and self-administered morphine to deaden the pain enabling him to continue his dangerous undertaking. Through this period of time, he constantly shouted words of encouragement to all around him. Then, completely ignoring the warnings of others, and his pain, he continued his search for wounded, exposing himself to hostile fire; and, as bullets dug up the dirt around him, he held plasma bottles high while kneeling completely engrossed in his life saving mission. Then, after being struck a second time and with a bullet lodged in his thigh, he dragged himself over the battlefield and succeeded in treating 13 more men before his medical supplies ran out. Displaying resourcefulness, he saved the life of one man by placing a plastic bag over a severe chest wound to congeal the blood. As 1 of the platoons pursued the Viet Cong, an insurgent force in concealed positions opened fire on the platoon and wounded many more soldiers. With a new stock of medical supplies, Sp6c. Joel again shouted words of encouragement as he crawled through an intense hail of gunfire to the wounded men. After the 24 hour battle subsided and the Viet Cong dead numbered 410, snipers continued to harass the company. Throughout the long battle, Sp6c. Joel never lost sight of his mission as a medical aidman and continued to comfort and treat the wounded until his own evacuation was ordered. His meticulous attention to duty saved a large number of lives and his unselfish, daring example under most adverse conditions was an inspiration to all. Sp6c. Joel's profound concern for his fellow soldiers, at the risk of his life above and beyond the call of duty are in the highest traditions of the U.S. Army and reflect great credit upon himself and the Armed Forces of his country.[2]
     
  20. Patsfanin Philly

    Patsfanin Philly Experienced Starter w/First Big Contract

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    #95 Jersey

    To appreciate the sacrifices of those who provided us the blanket of freedom under which we live, visit Arlington National Cemetery and watch the changing of the guard. Tour the grounds and hear the stories of valor and no greater love. You have to be awed.....

    YouTube - Trace Adkins - Arlington
     

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