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Football Gone in 20 Years?

Discussion in 'NFL Football Forum' started by PatsWickedPissah, Jun 14, 2013.

  1. PatsWickedPissah

    PatsWickedPissah PatsFans.com Supporter PatsFans.com Supporter

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    Lem Barney: Football will be gone in 20 years

    It's off season and this may be an extreme viewpoint but with the threads about Goodell wanting to eliminate kickoffs and the myriad rule changes ongoing and as we learn more about the science of concussions, I would not take the bet against this. Then I'll probably not be here in 20 years.
  2. Raymond

    Raymond Rookie

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    #24 Jersey

    My opinion would be, the NFL will change the rules as it deems necessary to continue the cash cow in any way possible.

    This will continue long, long after Lem Barney is dust in the wind.:cool:
  3. Brady_to_Moss

    Brady_to_Moss Revis Island is here PatsFans.com Supporter

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    #95 Jersey

    i could see more and more studies coming out talking about brain damage ect that could kill the sport in 20 years..but it's such a big $$ maker..who knows
  4. PatsWickedPissah

    PatsWickedPissah PatsFans.com Supporter PatsFans.com Supporter

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    May I suggest extreme lingerie football as one possibility?

    NFL is a $10B industry.

    Folks need note that relatively bigger industries have vanished in similar 2 decade timeframes.
  5. Aßßynormal

    Aßßynormal PatsFans.com Supporter PatsFans.com Supporter

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    I bet Goofball will still be around though, going down with the ship like Captain Smith.

    Football needs Federal legislation that limits liability. It's that simple. Goofball should use his energies there, instead of turning this sport into touch football.
  6. TriplecHamp

    TriplecHamp Rookie

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    #24 Jersey

    lol there is about .5% chance this happens. There are far more dangerous, and far far less profitable organizations that the NFL and NCAA. This simply wont happen.
  7. rlcarr

    rlcarr PatsFans.com Supporter PatsFans.com Supporter

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    It won't be the NFL getting sued that'll make football go away. It'll be a bottom up thing from parents not letting their kids play in school, and schools and Pee Wee/Pop Warner leagues dropping football (or going flag-only) because they won't be able to afford the liability insurance premiums otherwise.

    Especially when/if more data rolls in (as it appears to be starting to) about the long-term effects of concussions and repeated sub-concussive blows on teens and pre-teens.
  8. Dr Pain

    Dr Pain Rookie

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    I love football and played at a very high level through college. I did have 3 or 4 concussions and have memory loss from two of them where it was as if I woke up sometime later and don’t remember what happened. My son who would have easily been playing in college if he took up football, was never that interested and I never brought it up ever. If I had said to him that he should play he would have. He mentioned playing a few times but I never responded. Didn’t tell him no but I didn’t say that’s a good idea either.

    Whats my point? There will be no middle class or above playing football and it will just be the poor. There will be enough players as long as they don’t expand the league. Someone is going to die in the game soon. The players are just too fast and too strong and the consistency of a brain is the same if you are 100lbs or 350. Look at boxing which is another sport I loved. In the 60s-80s it was huge. Can you even name a current boxer now?
  9. primetime

    primetime Rookie

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    This article doesn't make the boxing analogy but some do (in fact, it was made right above this post while i was typing!!). It's a terrible analogy though, because boxing's demise can be tied to integration when black athletes were able to earn money in sports that didn't involve punching each other until their heads burst. There's no imaginable event that can change the landscape of American sports the way that integration did.

    Federal legislation to limit liability is one of those things that would be just heinous. There are lots of jobs that do require massive sacrifices on the parts of their workers. Miners, construction workers, etc. Even jobs that require mental sacrifices (dentists with high suicide rates, lawyers work 90 hour weeks and burn out)... the key is compensating people for their work, making sure the work environment is as safe as possible (as the NFL has attempted to do), and having in place a retirement system where injured workers are not forcing themselves to go back to work to earn wages at the risk of their future quality of life. This means pensions, disability, medical coverage (not just for those who are eligible for Medicare), and workforce retraining.

    That said, I would also be extremely hesitant about allowing my children to play football.
  10. Joker

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    this is horrible...you mean someone may even die soon??? that's it...OUTLAW the NFL immediately!!!..."...hic...hey buddy, you got a light???...thansk pal...hey barkeep, what's the damages???...8 Buds?...hey wait a minute, I only had six...wasshatalkinaboud, man....wheresh my keys?..i gotta get outta here fast...."

    peopel smoke and drink to the tune of a million + deaths a year...I don't see anyone outlawing the tobacco or liquor industries...playing NFL football is a conscious choice...every player knows the pros and cons...the league will disappear when people put more value on their health than making millions of dollars...which means ,most likely, never....
  11. Dr Pain

    Dr Pain Rookie

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    I guy I work with son is paralyzed from high school football. I love football but I don’t want my son playing. I don’t have a problem if you do or you let your kid. It is not a choice I would make.

    Whitworth will pay for funeral of boy who died from football injuries | ProFootballTalk

    This will happen in an NFL game. No one knows how the public will react. It happened in 60 and 63. There was not 7x24 tv back then.
  12. Joker

    Joker PatsFans.com Supporter PatsFans.com Supporter

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    I would never want ANY of my family to play NFL football...that wasn't my point....if you can't see that, I won't belabor my point because it's far down the list of things that are important to me as a Pats fan.
  13. Dr Pain

    Dr Pain Rookie

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    The thing is it’s not just NFL, its college, high school pop warner etc… take a look at the top high school prospects and then check the NFL drafts 3 – 5 years out and you will see many/most wash out. Many owing to injuries. I had my worst concussion in high school not college. If I run a school district I am not sure football would be a priority.
  14. Joker

    Joker PatsFans.com Supporter PatsFans.com Supporter

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    well, maybe the soccer moms will finally get the break they been looking for since the 80's. Dry up the developmental river and the game will strangle itself out of existence. Outlawing it is preposterous.
  15. ctpatsfan77

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    Simply put, the game will eventually—and more likely sooner rather than later—have to change.

    I disagree with the idea that waivers are a good idea; you're just passing the buck to young players who may or may not be able to make educated decisions about their future.
  16. RayClay

    RayClay Rookie

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    #75 Jersey

    He's right about eliminating the helmets-at least the hard shell missiles they have today. There was one soft shell model that kind of deteriorated, but you can't tell me a concerted effort or competition to make a soft shell helmet wouldn't bear fruit. Nobody's going to tackle helmet first in a soft helmet, not repeatedly anyway.
  17. Se7eN

    Se7eN Rookie

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    Football is simply too profitable, even at a high-school level. It will adapt to public demand instead of dying out.
  18. Lifer

    Lifer Banned

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    "Shana...they bought their tickets. They knew the risk. I say..let 'em crash"
  19. Quientus

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    Not being an American, but wasn't the soft helmets they used in the 50's/60's (?) replaced because hard helmets provided better comfort (and protection) ?

    I do agree with the sentiment, however, Unfortunately I think it will not happen ...
  20. Rob0729

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    In 20 years, players will be playing with their own personalize force field like they have on Star Trek. Well probably not that advanced, but I assume the sports technology in 20 years will be that they have equipment that can eliminate concussions in football or reduce to very, very few.

    I assume at some point in the next ten years or so that the sports equipment will outpace the injuries caused by the sport and there will minimum risk for serious injuries that could be life changing like what we see from concussions in the NFL. When that point is reached, I expect the rules to start to lax on hitting.
  21. betterthanthealternative

    betterthanthealternative Rookie

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    The likelihood is that we will see change in all of these areas - rules to reduce the violence but keep the strategy, athleticism, and speed; equipment improvements; and legal liability limitations. None of the three will solve the problem alone, but together they will get close.

    The one comment in all that's said above that really makes me think is the one about class distinctions. My son (6'4", 225) was a high school sprinter, javelin thrower, basketball player, and state volleyball MVP on a championship team. He had a great time with high school athletics. In college, he did all of that again.

    The college football coach tried to recruit him to play, and he came to me for advice. My comment: "Will playing football be more likely to enhance your future life, or limit it?" It didn't take him long to answer it. He went on to grad school and a career using his head (brains). He's recently quit his job at the White House and is motorcycling around the world, which he considers less dangerous than playing college football.

    I suspect that will be the question that divides the haves and have nots - is football more likely to enhance your life or limit it?
  22. TriplecHamp

    TriplecHamp Rookie

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    #24 Jersey


    Most people who don't even watch boxing know who Manny Pacquiao and Floyd Mayweather jr are. The problem boxing is suffering from now is a lack of a great heavyweight American fighter like a Tyson. The heavyweight division is almost irrelevant today with the dominance of the Klitchko brothers and their less than appealing style.
  23. vyrago

    vyrago Rookie

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    Not if you play football, you probably won't.
    Perhaps boxing is the example that football will follow. It still exists, but name me the heavyweight champion of the world (a silly title if there ever was one). MMA is sort of boxing, but it is hardly as popular as boxing was in the 40ies, 50ies and 60ies and those pictures of bloodied, broken fighters don't help.

    When it finally sinks in that we are getting immense pleasure from watching huge, talented men maim themselves and their opponents, I think football will morph--through disgust, guilt and legislation into a faint shadow of its present self.
  24. RayClay

    RayClay Rookie

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    #75 Jersey

    Actually, that's addressed in this article, but I don't think the past matters since no one predicted the extent to which these hardcaps would be used as missiles by players launching or battering.

    There have been soft helmets used in the modern NFL and the inventor is making more. You simply aren't going to batter with your head when you have a soft helmet on
  25. primetime

    primetime Rookie

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    Or that 40,000 people a year die in car accidents, which we consider an acceptable number for the convenience of our cars. It's the same thing we were talking about in the other thread, though - sensationalism versus statistics. We'll have extremely tight and inconveniencing (and expensive) security and rules in airports, sporting events, etc. or a country where our government collects all our data on a massive scale and houses in on servers in Nevada to maybe save a handful of lives (maybe - it may never happen, it may not save anyone) every few years yet we're willing to keep driving cars and smoking cigarettes and those claim exponentially more on a daily basis.

    Look, the NFL has done good things to improve player safety and could probably do more. Science needs to look into ways to prevent concussions. The league needs to improve options for retired players, and not just start it at age 50 or 65. But I think it's being more than a little sensationalist to suggest that football will be gone in 20 years.
  26. Raymond

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    #24 Jersey

    What ? Huh?:confused:
  27. ctpatsfan77

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    FWIW, don't forget that in 1905 (before the NFL existed), 18 athletes died from football injuries.

    That contributed to a movement to ban football outright (the New York Times, at the time, called it a "curable evil").

    But in came Teddy Roosevelt, who convened a meeting where the college folk agreed to make some major changes to make the game less rugby-like. The most notable of those: the legalization of the forward pass.

    IOW, football's adapted before. If it has to change to survive, it will.
  28. Gwedd

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    No Jersey Selected

    Personally, I see the NFL embracing technology in a bid to improve safety on the field.

    In addition to helmets and shoulder pads, hip pads, etc, I can see a type of "flak jacket" made like modern Dragon Scale armor, with a hard shell surface and dense-foam padding beneath, like shoulder pads. Very flexible yet very protective of the torso. Similar pieces for the upper and lower legs, arms, etc. Not limiting of movement, or adding much weight, but helping to prevent fractures, ruptured spleens, sports hernias, etc. In fact, it wouldn't be at all out of the realm of possibility to develop a free-moving device on the back of the helmet that looks like a neck roll, or soft tail, that hardens under pressure when hit, keeping the helmet from being forced back or to the side more than a specific amount, thus preventing neck strains and potential C-series fractures. Kid's already have a toy clay that does the same thing. It's soft and pliable until you squeeze it, when it becomes firm and solid.

    I can definitely see moves towards the tech/equipment area before any sort of decline in the NFL begins.

    Having said that, we have to understand that football, like track & field, swimming, boxing, wrestling, etc, are all just pandering to our base instincts for competition and warfare. The Olympic games, and the sports they began with, like javelin, discuss, running, wrestling, boxing, etc, were all training for war. It was a way then, and is now, of showing our potential for combat through the actions of the best warriors. Sports, at it's most basic level, is a blood sport without the maiming and death. It's always been that, and it always will.

    There's a reason that the modern NFL, boxing, wrestling, etc, all look so much like the arenas of ancient Rome, that the phrase "gladiator" is used so often. It's who we are as a race, it's in our genetic makeup, and attempts to lesson that go against the basic grain of our personalities. We do so at the risk of depressing our abilities to defend ourselves in the future.

    Now, that's all probably better suited to another thread here, but that's my argument against the further dilution of football. We can embrace technology, but in the end, it, like all sports, is a violent thing and it's an outlet that society needs.
  29. Tunescribe

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    #61 Jersey

    I think the NFL will exist for many decades to come. Heck, the Roman gladiator games flourished for hundreds of years before Rogerius Goodellicus replaced them with maypole dancing in the 5th century. :eek:
  30. spacecrime

    spacecrime Rookie

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    Can you name a few $10B industries that vanished in two decades?

    All I can think of are print newspapers (still alive but dying), and record industry. But newspapers didn't vanish, they just morphed into a bigger cash cow (internet), and if the record industry is now the recording industry. THeir 'death' was also stupidity in not embracing a new way of doing business. I doubt the NFL will rigidly stick to a format that is dying. If nothing else, they are business savvy.

    Oh, maybe bookstores? They're still around. Borders is gone, but then so is the USFL and the XFL.

    Video rental stores?Again, the base product (movies) remained. Only the format changed. Adapt or die. I think the NFL will adapt.

    But what $10B industries vanished?

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