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False prophet Rick Warren draws fire from both the left and right

Discussion in 'Political Discussion' started by DisgruntledTunaFan, Apr 21, 2009.

  1. DisgruntledTunaFan

    DisgruntledTunaFan In the Starting Line-Up

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    Warren: From Peacemaker to Lightning Rod

    Warren: From Peacemaker to Lightning Rod

    Unlike many evangelical leaders of recent decades, the Rev. Rick Warren doesn't want to be a lightning rod. When I asked him before the last election whether the Christian right had tarnished the image of American evangelicals, Warren didn't blink: "without a doubt."

    "I never was a part of it," Warren said of the Christian right. "I'm trying to stake out what I call a common ground for the common good."

    Indeed, Warren has adopted causes important to the political right and the left. He toes the conservative evangelical line on gay marriage and abortion rights but has also decried global warming and taken a high-profile role battling AIDS in Africa, two traditionally liberal issues. [Read 'Rick Warren: Stopping Gay Marriage 'Very Low' on Priority List'.]

    Lately, though, Warren has attracted more attention for his ability to rile both sides in the nation's smoldering culture wars. Months after his appearance at President Obama's inauguration enraged gay rights activists and abortion rights supporters, Warren has emerged from a self-imposed media exile only to outrage conservative Christians. That's because he appeared to dial back support for Proposition 8, California's recently adopted ban on gay marriage, in an interview last week with CNN's Larry King. " never once even gave an endorsement in the two years Prop. 8 was going," Warren told King, even though he'd taped a video urging his Orange County congregation to support the gay marriage ban. Warren argued that encouraging parishioners to back Prop. 8 doesn't make him an activist against gay marriage. [See a photo gallery of Obama's inauguration.]

    When Warren canceled a scheduled appearance last Sunday on ABC's This Week with George Stephanopoulos, conservative evangelical activists grew even more suspicious. "He appears to be running away from the biblical truth on what marriage is," says Wendy Wright, president of Concerned Women for America. "He does need to do a public interview to clear this up."

    Warren's aides say he plans to do an interview to clarify his support for Proposition 8. And they insist that Warren pulled out of Sunday's interview because of exhaustion. But at a moment when Warren is expanding his role from megachurch pastor to national and international public figure, his increasing proclivity for sowing controversy is threatening his status as political peacemaker. "He would really like it if everyone would love Rick Warren, and when they don't, he's troubled," says Jeffery Sheler, author of the forthcoming Warren biography Prophet of Purpose. "The most damaging thing would be if the way he's perceived makes it more difficult to be a bridge builder."

    The flap over his Larry King appearance speaks as much to Warren's struggle to adjust to a higher-profile role as to his unorthodox politics. Long accustomed to speaking to like-minded evangelicals, Warren has developed an informal style that eschews speechwriters and image consultants. But in discussing Proposition 8 off the cuff on CNN, a close associate says, Warren misspoke in appearing to disavow his support for the measure. And Sheler says, "He would have benefited from writing out talking points or allowing a staffer to help vet his thoughts."

    But conservatives were so quick to pounce on Warren's seeming flip-flop because they have long been put off by his overtures to liberals. When Warren invited then Sen. Barack Obama to his Saddleback Church for a global AIDS summit in 2006, antiabortion groups objected to giving a "pro-death" politician an evangelical platform. And when Warren announced that he would host a forum for presidential candidates Obama and John McCain last summer, conservative Christians blasted his decision to de-emphasize hot-button issues and focus on areas like poverty and climate change.

    After Warren's recent CNN appearance, his critics on the right are as miffed about his warmth toward "all my gay friends" as they are about his specific misstatement on Proposition 8. "I hope he is not intimidated by the tactics of homosexual activists," says Concerned Women for America's Wright. "He has a unique ability to present biblical truth on marriage to a wider audience."

    Gay rights groups, meanwhile, have also ratcheted up their criticism of Warren. "Rev. Warren is not a moderate pastor who is trying to bring all sides together," the Human Rights Campaign, the nation's largest gay rights group, wrote in a letter to Obama protesting Warren's inauguration role. "Instead, Rev. Warren has often played the role of general in the cultural war waged against LGBT [lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender] Americans." [Read more about politics and religion.]

    Warren's recent apology for comparing gay marriage to pedophilia and incest in an interview last December has done little to change that view. "You can't say to someone that I care about you but I disrespect your marriage," says Harry Knox, director of the Human Rights Campaign's religion and faith program. "He's going to continue to draw the ire of both conservatives and people who are working for marriage equality by trying to have it both ways."

    But Warren's defenders argue that his critics on the left and right give him credibility with the majority of middle-of-the-road Americans. And they note that Warren is much more interested in fighting AIDS, poverty, and illiteracy in Africa than in domestic social issues. So far, Warren has emerged from each controversy with a higher profile, leading his detractors to watch his every word even more closely than before.
     
  2. Fogbuster

    Fogbuster Pro Bowl Player

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    So the "Human Rights Campaign" -- what, no person wrote this?? it was written by some "campaign"???? please, with the hiding behind some grandiose group think -- says that Warren "cannot" say he loves the sinner while hating the sin. The Human Rights Campaign is wrong. If your child burns down the neighbor's house, you'll be pretty upset but you wouldn't stop loving your child. People mess up all the time, but that doesn't mean we stop loving them. Love is always beyond all mistakes, but that doesn't mean we accept those mistakes as "good" things.



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  3. DarrylS

    DarrylS PatsFans.com Supporter PatsFans.com Supporter

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    In some situations, people love the sinner so much they want to put them internment camps until they die.. see aids victims..
     
  4. Fogbuster

    Fogbuster Pro Bowl Player

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    When all else fails perhaps baling wire and duct tape can hold your head together as it tries to explode.


    :eek:

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  5. DarrylS

    DarrylS PatsFans.com Supporter PatsFans.com Supporter

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    INtelligent, thought provoking response.. adds value to the discourse taking place here.
     
  6. Fogbuster

    Fogbuster Pro Bowl Player

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    Thank you!! I thought it was most appropriate to the comments it was addressing!!! :D


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