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Conservatives Against Illegal Spying

Discussion in 'Political Discussion' started by All_Around_Brown, Feb 6, 2006.

  1. All_Around_Brown

    All_Around_Brown Rookie

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  2. Harry Boy

    Harry Boy Look Up, It's Amazing PatsFans.com Supporter

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    Balderdash, the American people support it, if somebody is planning on killing them they want to know about it.

    Abraham Lincoln would shoot Harry Reid for treason. Can you imagine telling Lincoln not to "SPY" on the South. :bricks:
  3. gomezcat

    gomezcat It's SIR Moderator to you Staff Member PatsFans.com Supporter

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    One is left wondering who will be left in his camp in three years' time. The words duck and lame come to mind. May I be first to call these people anti-American, freedom-hating, do gooder, liberals? :D
  4. BelichickFan

    BelichickFan B.O. = Fugazi PatsFans.com Supporter

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    #24 Jersey

    I've been anti-Bush for several years due to his massive spending, like the prescription drug addition to medicare, but I have no problem with the wire tapping. If we want the government to be able to stop things we need them to be able to discover things.
    Last edited: Feb 6, 2006
  5. Patters

    Patters Moderator Staff Member PatsFans.com Supporter

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    The government, yes, but the president should not be allowed to make law; otherwise, we're a dictatorship, perhaps a benign one, but a dictatorship nonetheless. Our founders created a system of checks and balances to prevent the abuse of power. No one denies the government may need special powers in order to fight terrorism, but for the president to simply usurp those powers creates a dangerous precedent that could lead to all sorts of abuse.
  6. sdaniels7114

    sdaniels7114 Rookie

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    As long as its legal for the Admin to get the warrant up to 72 hours after starting to eavesdrop, there's no legitimate reason for Bush to be breaking the law.
  7. Pujo

    Pujo Rookie

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    Since when have the "American people" been one voice? Seems like lots & lots & lots of American people find this reprehensible.
    Lots of differences there. That's called a "fallacy".
  8. All_Around_Brown

    All_Around_Brown Rookie

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    wow...thats radical. You don't care much for the US constitutions 4th amendment huh?
  9. BelichickFan

    BelichickFan B.O. = Fugazi PatsFans.com Supporter

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    #24 Jersey

    I have relatives in England, the government can pick up the phone and listen in all they want. I'll give that up if it increases the chance a little bit that next time I get on a plane it's not blown out of the sky. Life's full of give and take, this give is worth the take for me.
  10. wistahpatsfan

    wistahpatsfan Rookie

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    #75 Jersey

    But Harry, that was a WAR with a real enemy army.
  11. DIXIE

    DIXIE Rookie

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    Real enemy army :confused:
  12. patriotspride

    patriotspride Banned

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    have some bricks :bricks:
  13. All_Around_Brown

    All_Around_Brown Rookie

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    I'll take that as a yes. You will sacrifice the 4th amendment for a little feeling of security. (I wonder if gomezcat has seen any bombings in his country lately, considering that is your argument)

    How about the second amendment. Does England have one of those? Would you give that one up to?

    How about the first? Would you be fine if they just banned the internet and jail people for wearing T-shirts with political statements?
  14. wistahpatsfan

    wistahpatsfan Rookie

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    #75 Jersey

    Yup. You know: Real army enemy of traitor bastids trying to break up the country who ended up gettin they buts wooped but good. As opposed to a ragtag band of un-uniformed, 19th century technology weilding terrorists...Isn't that the image the government gives us?
  15. Pujo

    Pujo Rookie

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    You're trying to convince him of your view by mocking him? Belichickfan has a very valid fear about security, and it's always about trying to find a balance between competing interests: it's never as clear cut as yes you would or wouldn't sacrifice the 4th amendment.
  16. BelichickFan

    BelichickFan B.O. = Fugazi PatsFans.com Supporter

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    #24 Jersey

    I didn't say I'd give up the entire 4th amendment. But listening in on international calls, one side of which is in the U.S. is fine with me. Everyone says "the government needs to stop these things before they happen" but they don't want to give them the tools. Like this. And racial profiling. I'm not saying all Arabs should be put in jail but they should be more heavily profiled than me or some old lady. We have to be smart about things and this small piece of the 4th amendment is sacrificeable to me.
  17. Pujo

    Pujo Rookie

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    The question is "how far until the tools go too far?" The system we have in place under our legal framework allows the President to wiretap somebody for up to 72 hours (in intelligence investigations, not criminal ones) before obtaining a court order. He can then get the court order from the top-secret FISA court (by the way, there is always a FISA judge on-call, day or night). The FISA court doesn't have a public record or publish opinions, and the hearings are classified. It consists of federal judges and is a bona fide Article III court (meaning it has the right to act as part of the Judicial branch of the United States, unlike some administrative courts). Through the end of 2004, 18,761 warrants were granted, while just five were rejected (many sources say four).

    It seems like the President has the tools and the discretion to do his job already, but with a few safeguards that don't seem all that trite. Abuse of power is real, and it ALWAYS happens. I think recently the scales been tipping toward complacency, and I don't like the always-slippery slope.
    Last edited: Feb 6, 2006
  18. wistahpatsfan

    wistahpatsfan Rookie

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    #75 Jersey

    It most DEFINITELY is as clear-cut as yes or no when it comes to the Bill of Rights - particularly the 4th Amendment, and particularly when there's a perfectly workable mechanism in place to enable the security apparatus to function under the intact constitutional gauranty.

    I just LMFAO when I hear people say it's OK to let a peice of our freedom go down the john so we can "feel safe". That small piece of your rights will not come back UP the toilet EVER. You need a warrant to conduct a search.
  19. Pujo

    Pujo Rookie

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    No, it's not as clear cut as "sacrifice the 4th amendment" because the 4th amendment, like the rest of the constitution, is written in broad language as a collection of ideas rather than am exact step-by-step guide. Someone can say, and I think they'd be wrong, that the President under his Article I powers can evesdrop on international telephone calls. I think they can say that while still believing in the fourth amendment, they're just taking it to a certain point and we're taking it to another point.

    I do think our point better fits with the original intent most of the drafters had.
  20. FreeTedWilliams

    FreeTedWilliams pfadmins PatsFans.com Supporter

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    #75 Jersey

    No matter how you frame this to fit the left's needs. They are only intercepting calls with the follwing creteria and only the following creteria:

    One end of the call is outside the United States AND

    One of the parties has a known tie to terrorism.

    I would be enraged if they weren't doing this!

    More phone calls are being intercepted in the United States by Nigeria scam artists (they stand by you with a scanner and "clone" your cell phone) than the NSA.

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