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Bush's long history of tilting Justice

Discussion in 'Political Discussion' started by DarrylS, Mar 30, 2007.

  1. DarrylS

    DarrylS PatsFans.com Supporter PatsFans.com Supporter

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    An opinion piece from a former Civil Rights Division lawyer from DOJ, interesting perspective... said before and will say again, GWB is systematically dismantling many rights and entitlements that we are used to.. some of us will wake up one day and ask what happened to this protection that we all have been used to and it will just be gone..

    http://www.latimes.com/news/opinion/la-oe-rich29mar29,0,3371050.story?coll=la-opinion-rightrail

    THE SCANDAL unfolding around the firing of eight U.S. attorneys compels the conclusion that the Bush administration has rewarded loyalty over all else. A destructive pattern of partisan political actions at the Justice Department started long before this incident, however, as those of us who worked in its civil rights division can attest.

    I spent more than 35 years in the department enforcing federal civil rights laws — particularly voting rights. Before leaving in 2005, I worked for attorneys general with dramatically different political philosophies — from John Mitchell to Ed Meese to Janet Reno. Regardless of the administration, the political appointees had respect for the experience and judgment of longtime civil servants.

    Under the Bush administration, however, all that changed. Over the last six years, this Justice Department has ignored the advice of its staff and skewed aspects of law enforcement in ways that clearly were intended to influence the outcome of elections.

    It has notably shirked its legal responsibility to protect voting rights. From 2001 to 2006, no voting discrimination cases were brought on behalf of African American or Native American voters. U.S. attorneys were told instead to give priority to voter fraud cases, which, when coupled with the strong support for voter ID laws, indicated an intent to depress voter turnout in minority and poor communities.

    At least two of the recently fired U.S. attorneys, John McKay in Seattle and David C. Iglesias in New Mexico, were targeted largely because they refused to prosecute voting fraud cases that implicated Democrats or voters likely to vote for Democrats.
     
  2. Fogbuster

    Fogbuster Pro Bowl Player

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    What the president is doing is NOTHING compared to what would happen in America if terrorists pulled off another 9/11 type attack. There would be martial law and you'd be going through metal detectors to go to any restaurant.

    Bush has had the balls to go after those who are not only DIRECTLY responsible -- haven't heard much from Osamy recently, have we ?? -- and also those indirectly responsible. The hard core in Iran, Syria, and elsewhere know they are living in a different, tougher world than what they enjoyed before, and we have Geo Bush to thank for it.




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  3. PressCoverage

    PressCoverage Banned

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    really? that's interesting.... tell us, what does the hard core Al Qaeda in Afghanistan/Pakistan think? you know, the ones DIRECTLY responsible that he quit on, drew down, and diverted away from?
     
  4. Fogbuster

    Fogbuster Pro Bowl Player

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    How many attacks have there been since 9/11?? That's all anyone needs to worry about. The al qaeda network has been badly disrupted, many of their leaders have been killed or captured, Gitmo is a success, and the terrorists know it.

    What's your problem?? You don't like success in defeating the terrorists??


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  5. DarrylS

    DarrylS PatsFans.com Supporter PatsFans.com Supporter

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    You are completely blinded by this man, and not sure if I have ever seen anyone buy all the stuff this guys spits out as much as you do. not sure what your frame of reference is, but it is definitely skewed. Maybe it is those 4 years of ROTC???
     
  6. Fogbuster

    Fogbuster Pro Bowl Player

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    When you have something of substance to offer, come on back. If you want to degenerate into ad hom, so be it, but you can do it by yourself.







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  7. QuiGon

    QuiGon Banned

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    So are you - blinded by hatred, that is.
    All those fired individuals serve (or, I should say, "served") at the pleasure of the President of the United States of America. He has every right to fire them at his slightest whim. Bill Clinton did the exact same thing (but I guess when Clinton does it, then it's OK).

    If you don't like what Bush is doing, then I suggest you campaign harder for your own candidate for the Presidency next time.
     
  8. Pujo

    Pujo Experienced Starter w/First Big Contract

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    Blah blah blah. You're monotonous, you remind me of Al Gore or John Kerry.
     
    Last edited: Mar 30, 2007
  9. Fogbuster

    Fogbuster Pro Bowl Player

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    :nono:


    Now, now, we don't want Bush supporters to start acting petty.



    :D


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  10. Pujo

    Pujo Experienced Starter w/First Big Contract

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    That would be very unusual, they're above that sort of thing. Clinton did bad stuff, we know, he was impeached for it. But he's no excuse, wrong is wrong no matter who else has done it. Buck stops here for Dubya.
     
  11. Real World

    Real World Moderator Staff Member

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    The get Bubya crusade is funny. The people who blindly hate are accusing the people who blindly support for being stupid.

    Pot, kettle, black. :D

    If people are upset with these firings then they should be upset with the historical policy of these appointments being political. Instead, they are clearly only upset that it was GW who fired somebody. I guess that's what you get for 30% approval ratings. Has anyone ever thought that maybe the process needs to be altered since GW did what every president before has had the authority to do?
     
  12. Pujo

    Pujo Experienced Starter w/First Big Contract

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    There is an area where Congress can make a difference here. The Patriot Act changed the law to allow the AG to make appointments without Senate confirmation. That provision, which didn't exist before Bush and so couldn't have been abused by Clinton, needs to be repealed. I'm just as worried about some Democrat in office doing the same thing. This isn't going to lead to Bush's impeachment, but it might lead to a change in the law, which is a good thing.
     
    Last edited: Mar 30, 2007
  13. Real World

    Real World Moderator Staff Member

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    Fine, but the Patriot Act didn't alter the presidents ability to fire anyone, alla Jimmy Carter David Marston.
     
  14. Pujo

    Pujo Experienced Starter w/First Big Contract

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    Nope, but that's not the question here, and at the end of the day, the President will retain the ability to fire people. Congress attempted to narrow this power in the past but was rebuffed by the Supreme Court.

    But we might still get other results, and that makes this worth persuing. While what Bush did was legal, it's still infuriating.
     
  15. DarrylS

    DarrylS PatsFans.com Supporter PatsFans.com Supporter

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    So I guess most of the righties did not read the article, instead reverted to the same old game playing, still do not know how this man can be blindly defended.
     
  16. Real World

    Real World Moderator Staff Member

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    So you're admitting that this isn't scandalous, or corrupt, just that it's upsetting, although legal. That's my position on it anyway.
     
  17. Real World

    Real World Moderator Staff Member

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    THE SCANDAL unfolding around the firing of eight U.S. attorneys compels the conclusion that the Bush administration has rewarded loyalty over all else. A destructive pattern of partisan political actions at the Justice Department started long before this incident, however, as those of us who worked in its civil rights division can attest.

    Ok, "scandal"? They are political appointments, so they are partisan in essence.

    For decades prior to this administration, the Justice Department had successfully kept politics out of its law enforcement decisions.

    He obviously knows better than I, and I'm not saying he's wrong as I wouldn't know, but do you honestly believe that politics has never been part of the Justice Department?
     
  18. Pujo

    Pujo Experienced Starter w/First Big Contract

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    I do think it's scandalous, I think it's upsetting, but I doubt it's illegal. The only reason I'm not sure it isn't illegal is the whole 5th amendment business. But this isn't an investigation to get indictments, it's an investigation to get what happened into the open.
     
  19. Real World

    Real World Moderator Staff Member

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    Get Bush! :mad:
     
  20. Pujo

    Pujo Experienced Starter w/First Big Contract

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    Not such a bad idea.
     

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