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Brewing Beer....

Discussion in 'The PatsFans.com Pub' started by notex, Jan 20, 2007.

  1. notex

    notex Rookie

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    anyone ever try home brewing beer... i was interested in trying it, if anyone has any tips thatd be great.. thanks
  2. Terry Glenn is a cowgirl

    Terry Glenn is a cowgirl Banned

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    ditto... ditto... ditto... please give some tips.

    That would be very generous.
  3. notex

    notex Rookie

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    theres like a million different guides online but i dont know what kind of beer them make...would love a guide from anyone whose tried it...

    Terry Glenn let me know if you find anything worthwhile :rocker: thanks bro
  4. shirtsleeve

    shirtsleeve Rookie

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    You've come to the right place. Buy a complete basic beer brewing equipment kit. Buy a big tub of C brite sterilizer, and any brushes, caps, etc. that you will need. Most of the better home brew stores will help there. You will also need at least a 3 gallon brew kettle. The initial equipment will set you back about $100. Go to a local restaraunt or bar and get 3 cases of bar bottles. They will make you pay for the deposit. And you will have to wash the hell outta them before sterilization, but it will save $$.
    Then start with a pre-assembled beer "kit". It will have a can of malt extract, perhaps dry malt extract, yeast, hops, perhaps some grains. It depends on the flavor you are looking for. Two things to remember. 1. Everything MUST be sterile. 2. Patience is a virtue. You wont drink your first batch for 2 months.
    A great supplier I use in central Ma. is NFG homebrew. They have a web site. Check them out. If you are looking for a greeatttt first batch to brew, try their Canadian Ale. Its a partial mash, and can be just a little more complicated than some, but boy, you wont believe the flavor.
    I have been at this for a couple of years and still pretty much stick to partial mashing. The whole thought and expense of doing a full mash brew, coolers, tubs, etc is just too much work for very little extra reward. But I do now keg with a dual keg system, and I regularly experiment to find different flavors. I write everything down, so when I nail a recipe, I can duplicate it. I will be glad to help you if you want to get into it. Its fun (but fattening). And you will never want to drink anything commercial except microbrews again.
  5. JoeSixPat

    JoeSixPat Rookie

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    I've done it a few times in my younger days when I had the time for such projects - there are plenty of places to get the equipment - some glass carbouys etc...

    You need a good full day I'd say. Cleanliness is the most important thing. Get a lot of friends to help and scrub all your equipment and bottles and carbouys as if you were going into surgery.

    One little bacteria will skunk an entire batch.

    Everything else is pretty straightforward and the instructions for boiling, what to do and when are easy enough. Its the prep work that gets overlooked that makes the big difference.

    Bottling is good and fun to share your efforts with others. Personally I've found that using the pressurized canisters - those often used for soda syrup often conveniently "left" behind many restaurants - make great kegs.

    They are much smaller than other kegs but work the same way - CO2 tank for pressure in - and a simple spigot attachment coming off the other valve. Saves a lot of time in the labor intensive and messy bottling later as you just transfer from the carboy to the keg when finally brewed.

    The Pale Ales were always my favorite.... even grew my own hops for awhile - which are easy to grow though they will quickly take over an area if given a trellis or other structure to vine over.
  6. shirtsleeve

    shirtsleeve Rookie

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    Hey Joe, I use those 5 gallon cornelius kegs too. I have two of them in a mini fridge, co2 canister, reg, hoses, and taps through the door. Thats typically how we do it, everyone. These kegs are 1 batch sized. Perfect.
  7. notex

    notex Rookie

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    thanks alot...im ganna check that all out ill let ya know if i have some questions...need to set aside a couple of days to try to nail this thing down, im going to check that site out now...thanks again..
  8. shirtsleeve

    shirtsleeve Rookie

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    I've got tomorrow off, and I'll be brewing two more batches. One is their country ale and the other is one of my recipe's. My beers all tend to be "big beers" with alcohol content over 9% and very hoppy, though I typically use low alpha acid hops. Alpha acid is a measure that you can use to figure how bitter your beer will be. The higher the alpha acid, the more bitter the beer. The higher ones are typically boiling hops, the lower ones are used as finishing hops.
  9. Terry Glenn is a cowgirl

    Terry Glenn is a cowgirl Banned

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    What does "bock" mean?

    I love the darker, more choclate type beers. Porter, black ale, dopplebock, etc.

    I know that they are terrible for the tummy, and terrible the next day (if you have too many)... but... the taste cannot be beat, imo.

    How do you brew these types?
  10. shirtsleeve

    shirtsleeve Rookie

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    Historically, boch beers were brewed at the end of a brewing cycle, when the brewers would clean out their kettles. Some imports still are true boch beers. These brews really stick to your ribs. Dark as night, thick as molasses. Heavy duty stuff.

    Today, bock beers are readily available. Similar to Extra Stouts in color and body, their taste can resemble import bochs pretty closely. Most home brew supply stores sell either pre-made "kits" to brew one or they can give you a recipe and you can pull the ingredients off of the shelf.
  11. notex

    notex Rookie

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    do these brewing kits come with decent guides. i honestly am a rookie at this but i want it to be a thing that i can continue doing, try out all different recipes and what not...is there a paticular guide or instruction set that lays it all out good for a rook who doesnt know all the jargon yet...im looking at the complete gold brewing kit on that site you gave me then trying to get the rest of my supplies from them as well...

    i knew a football forum was a good place to ask...ganna find alot of expert beer drinkers here ::rocker:
  12. shirtsleeve

    shirtsleeve Rookie

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    The complete gold kit has a decent book with it. It will get you going. Thats a great kit to get started. Talk to the owner. He has very strange hours, as you can see from his site. Each of his "custom beer kits" for different recipes also come with detailed instructions which are very easy to follow. Have fun!
  13. JoeSixPat

    JoeSixPat Rookie

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    As shirtsleve said, most of the "kit" makers assume you know nothing. The guys at the brewing supply store will guide you right - they have a vested interest in letting you have a good experience. The appropriate kit will be very user friendly and something that will serve your needs if you really get into it.

    Generally I'd say avoid something cheap like this:

    [​IMG]

    and instead get a real but simple kit like this:

    [​IMG]
  14. notex

    notex Rookie

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    thats the kind of kit i was looking at, mayb a little different ...thanks
  15. JoeSixPat

    JoeSixPat Rookie

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    Yeah, that lower one is a bit more than I had... I'm not sure what the copper tubing was all about... I think you can get by with one bucket too, along with the glass carbouy... the bottle capper they show is a bit over the top too

    but again, those 5 gal kegs are the way to go... and as luck would have it many restaurants and fast food places just leave them out back, apparently to throw out ;)
  16. Patti37

    Patti37 Rookie

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    I do not know where you live but there is a great brew store in Woburn. They have a great stock and offer excellent advice. At certain times of the year they sell fresh hops.

    They are located in the industrial park off Route 128 behind the small mall. Their name escapes me at the moment.

    My husband use to brew beer and wine. We would go to that store frequently.

    One piece of advice I would offer is that temperature control is very important. If your house gets too cold the batch will suck...I am speaking from experience.
  17. Mike the Brit

    Mike the Brit Minuteman Target PatsFans.com Supporter

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    Disable Jersey

    "Get you a copper kettle, get you a copper coil
    Fill it with new-made corn mash
    And never more you will toil ..."
  18. Terry Glenn is a cowgirl

    Terry Glenn is a cowgirl Banned

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    corn whiskey makes your brain go soft...
  19. shirtsleeve

    shirtsleeve Rookie

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    Best to start off bottling. And one batch at a time to start. The copper coil is a wort cooler for an all grain mash process. Thats the process I said is a bit too involved for me. Perhaps someday. Partial mashes use a pound or two (or even three) of real grains in muslin bags, steeped in the brewing water at 160-170F for that all grain flavor without the work. Then extracts are added to bring the grain flavor and sugar levels up to where they need to be. These brews are my favorite to do. Much less time consuming, just as much freedom of recipes, and far less financially intensive. The advantage of all grain brews is when brewing large batches, after initial investment, the ingredients are much less expensive, allowing for eventual payback of first costs. But this is for the serious, large scale hobbyist or small micro-brewer. Out of my league.

    One note on water. Artesian well, spring or bottled spring water only. No municipal water. The junk in the pipes and the clorine in the water are all no-nos.

    Notex, the gold kit is like the one pictured here, without the wort chiller. And its a single batch kit, meaning one bucket and one carboy. You can always add buckets and carboys later to make more than one batch at a time. If you like the hobby, and boy the beer is great, you can look into kegging later.
  20. notex

    notex Rookie

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    i ordered that gold kit and im letting my father pickout the ingredients because im sort of doing this for him, hes older and needs a hobby (not to say that i dont) but hes really excited about this im happy i can get him off the couch for this. the kit should be here in the next few days and the ingredients in the next week. so id say mid-week next week we should be making the first batch...so it isnt ok to use spring water even if its boiled??
    im fully prepared for a bad first batch, hopefully this is something i can continue doing...also, how do you bottle the beer?? cuz the bars arent going to have caps for the bottles

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