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Brainiac schemes with minor reference to Super Bowl

Discussion in 'PatsFans.com - Patriots Fan Forum' started by BlitzFritz, Dec 15, 2008.

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  1. BlitzFritz

    BlitzFritz Third String But Playing on Special Teams

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  2. PatriotsInGA

    PatriotsInGA In the Starting Line-Up

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    #11 Jersey

    i just cant get into that stuff
     
  3. ALP

    ALP Veteran Starter w/Big Long Term Deal

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    i usally like it, but that was too long

    and about the SB, it really doesnt say too much other then that our o-linemen are not freaks of nature, like tuck, strahan were in the sb...
     
  4. BlitzFritz

    BlitzFritz Third String But Playing on Special Teams

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    hehe sorry about the length, scheming is complicated ;)

    anyway this guy is a football genius and the site is worthwhile.
    he basically is confirming what we all saw -- our highflying team was brought down to earth inexplicably by a killer pass rush.

    he then goes on to explain how pass rush scheming works.
    and what the giants did and did not do


    1. they played games with the line through dual read scheming

    "(As an interesting aside, in the Super Bowl against the Patriots the Giants cleverly inverted this concept: Linebacker Kavika Mitchell lined up over the center, while an outside rusher lined up in threatening position away from the side the running back was responsible for. At the snap, Mitchell head-faked as if he was dropping back into pass coverage, and the center – who no doubt had a dual read and was responsible for the outside rusher, and who knew he needed to move quick if he had a prayer of getting out there – cleared out. Mitchell, instead of dropping back, blitzed directly up the middle and sacked Tom Brady. Mitchell made a great fake, but the reason it was so open was because the center had protection responsibilities besides Mitchell. Again, dual reading by a down lineman is never easy. It is much easier for a running back who has more time to see the defense in front of him.)"
    -------

    2. their guys beat our guys one and one. oh, and the Pats made no adjustments

    "In both the Super Bowl and the Sugar Bowl, high-flying spread offenses (the Patriots were basically a spread team) were largely shut down because of an inability to protect the passer. And in both, there really wasn’t a lot of clever scheming going on, it was just lots of the Lawrence Taylor phenomenon: Who do you have that can block my guy? The answer for both the Patriots and the Hawaii Rainbows was, nobody. This was doubly surprising because both offensive lines had really performed quite well through the year: both units were disciplined, hard working, and did not blow assignments. Yet, they were exposed. The reality is that sometimes, good offensive line play is not enough. At the higher levels of football, if you’re going to deal with freaks of nature on defense, you need your own freaks of nature to block them. That’s why the best left tackles get paid so much, and why, as Michael Lewis’s book (link, amazon) chronicles, coaches at every level are searching for those kids who somehow combine behemoth size with incredible athleticism.

    But there has to be something you can do, right? Football is about reacting to and neutralizing the other team’s strengths. The most striking thing about the Super Bowl and the Sugar Bowl was that neither team – the Pats nor Hawaii – ever seemed that interested in trying to add H-backs or extra running backs to “chip” protect on their way out. (I.e. while they release on a pass route they get a small block or “chip” on the good pass rushers to help the other linemen make their blocks.) "
     
  5. TripleOption

    TripleOption Rotational Player and Threatening Starter's Job

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    Chris Brown's blog...I could lose myself for a month just reading the stuff there. He's excellent.
     
  6. chris_in_sunnyvale

    chris_in_sunnyvale In the Starting Line-Up

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    Informative article.

    Regards,
    Chris
     
  7. Leave No Doubt

    Leave No Doubt PatsFans.com Supporter PatsFans.com Supporter

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    Disclaimer: He lost me at the diagrams BUT...
    other than that he's very readable and it's obvious he's an outstanding analyst, wow. It's definitely long but he warns you of that up front. He says he posts less often than most bloggers so his stuff is also more lengthy.

    I liked his explanation of the blind side. Good site :)
     
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