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Bengals: a form of reverse racism?

Discussion in 'Visiting Locker Room' started by Tunescribe, Sep 14, 2006.

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  1. Tunescribe

    Tunescribe PatsFans.com Supporter PatsFans.com Supporter

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    #61 Jersey

    The Cincinnati Bengals' "Who Dey?" victory chant at the end of games in the lockerroom, presided over by Marvin Lewis, seems extremely "Afro-Americancentric" if you ask me. If I was a white player on that team I'd feel a bit odd trying to join in with the ghettospeak. Other teams do something similar. Granted, the majority of all teams are black, but I'm glad the Patriots' celebrations haven't been co-opted by black culture.
     
    Last edited: Sep 14, 2006
  2. outhere

    outhere Rookie

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    That's doing a great job of making an issue out of nothing and making yourself appear to be a racially phobic type of person. It's just a song and I'm sure everyone has their opinions, but you concern yourself with the comfort of a few people of specifically a different skin color, because, what, they don't understand "ghetto culture" you say?

    First you're using the word "co-opted" wrong, but I get what you're saying. Is it great thing that the patriots' culture of celebrations is pure and unmired by black culture? Is that what you really want to say?




    Moron
     
  3. Tunescribe

    Tunescribe PatsFans.com Supporter PatsFans.com Supporter

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    #61 Jersey

    Sorry if my observation wasn't "PC" enough for you, but yes -- in a team atmosphere, concern for the comfort of a racial minority (in this case whites) deserves consideration. (You'll find many examples of this down through the years as the black percentage of NFL rosters grew to a majority.) A celebration that allows for this in an all-inclusive manner might be unnecessary in your estimation; but however subtle, it can impact the underlying sense of unity. Whether the white players "understand" ghetto culture is irrelevant, I'm merely pointing out that racial considerations should work both ways. There is nothing at all racially phobic about what I'm saying and for you to put words in my mouth re., "Is it great thing that the patriots' culture of celebrations is pure and unmired by black culture?" makes YOU the "moron" for missing my point.

    By the way, I did not use "co-opt" improperly. Check your dictionary. (One more strike for you on the moron-ometer.)
     
    Last edited: Sep 15, 2006
  4. outhere

    outhere Rookie

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    It's not about being PC. First this line can be considered a racist comment, and second, you are still making an issue out of something that doesn't exist. Who's complaining?

    Co-opt
    1. To elect as a fellow member of a group.
    2. To appoint summarily.
    3. To take or assume for one's own use; appropriate: co-opted the criticism by embracing it.
    4. To neutralize or win over (an independent minority, for example) through assimilation into an established group or culture: co-opt rebels by giving them positions of authority.
     
  5. Tunescribe

    Tunescribe PatsFans.com Supporter PatsFans.com Supporter

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    #61 Jersey

    Try this definition for "co-opt": To adopt or appropriate something AS YOUR OWN. This shouldn't warrant any further explanation, knucklehead.

    You are the one reaching to interpret my initial comment as racist. Yes, I am glad the Patriots' post-game celebration HAS NOT BEEN CO-OPTED BY THE MAJORITY BLACK CULTURE because it otherwise would contain an exclusionary spin with the underlying potential to divide rather than unify, however slight that might be. Get it, yet? You also seem to be among those who see no problems or potential problems until someone issues a complaint. That strikes me as a bit sad. Perhaps no one associated with the Bengals has found or ever will find an issue with this. That doesn't make my observation any less valid.
     
    Last edited: Sep 15, 2006
  6. outhere

    outhere Rookie

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    It does in the sense that one can say there is a problem with group because of divisive activities the group undergoes. The problem is, if the group fails to perceive this divisive action, then there is no divisive action taking place.

    As for co-opt, a thing(the patriots) can co-opt somthing else(black culture styled celebrations), but the patriots celebrations cannot be co-opted, as in, the celebrations as a subject cannot be acted upon by co-opting. This is a the wrong use of the word, but I understood your point.
     
  7. Rudy

    Rudy Rookie

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    Today you learn how it got started, when it started and where it traveled once it became popular. It started in November of 1981. And following is the stepping stone to it's arrival.

    The Bengals were going up against the Steelers in the middle of October. Both had records of 4-2. The Steelers lost their first two games and then went on to win 4 in a row. It was the lowly Bengals playing the Super Bowl Champs of 1979 who was 9-7 in 1980. It was a big deal beating the Steelers because the Bengals already were defeated by co division leaders Houston and Cleveland who were 11-5 the year before.
    At that time Pittsburgh was the big game of the year. That and Buffalo who was 11-5 also in 1980. The Buffalo Bills game didn't mean as much because the Bengals only beat teams that had worse records than them in 1981 before that game. The first two games were against the Jets and Seahawks who had records of 4-12 in 1980. And Baltimore who won 1 more games than the Bengals in 1980.
    The Pittsburgh game meant more than all other games at the time. The Bengals Superbowl at the time. They won their Superbowl beating the Steelers 34-7. But the Bengals had a let down game following that game going against the Saints or (Ain'ts at that time). Losing 17-7.

    The future didn't look bright. Because next on the schedule every team had a winning record the year before. And the next 3 team were 11-5 after the 1980 season. First Houston who already beat us, then the Chargers and Rams. All three were in the playoffs the prior two years,The Rams and Oilers prior 3 years. San Diego was picked to win the Superbowl in 1981. Plus we had Cleveland again, who were 11-5 and Atlanta who finish 1980 at 12-4. Five of the teams had a total of 24 loses in 1980

    Cincinnati went on a great run. After starting out 5-3. They beat Houston by 13, San Diego by 23 and Los Angeles by 14. The chant started after the San Diego game. Second game of November. The Bengals had 5 games in November and won all 5. Beating every team by more than 2 TD's. The Bengals only lost one more game all the way up to the Superbowl. That game was against the 49'ers who they also played and lost to in the Superbowl.

    The chant started, Who They think is going to beat them Bengals. ( Cincinnati was on a roll.they were 7-3 a season after they finished 6-10 and prior two seasons 4-12) When some hollered, "Who They think is going to beat them Bengals" Other fans would reply with "Nobody"
    A week or two later. The whole chant started to grow, and the nobody was stretched out to Noooo Boooooooody. Coming from an old car commericial of (Red Frazier Ford ) who was out of business at the time. But had a very popular commercial, Who's going to give you a better deal than Red Frazier? Nooo Boooody.

    Following that, the chant put was on a 45 record. Recorded by Cincinnati's WLW weatherman Who's first name was Zip.



    From the banks of the Ohio comes that orange and black machine
    They're the Cincinnati Bengals The finest ever seen
    With stripes upon their helmets and fire in their eyes
    They'll take the field they will not yield
    They're strong and tough and wise
    Who Dey.Who Dey, Who Dey think gonna beat them Bengals
    Who Dey, Who Dey, Who Dey think gonna beat them Bengals
    Who Dey, Who Dey, Who Dey think gonna beat them Bengals
    Who Dey, Who Dey, Who Dey think gonna beat them Bengals

    Hear that Bengal growling, mean and angry
    See that Bengal prowling, lean and hungry
    An offensive brute, run, pass, or boot
    And defensively, he's rough errrr tough errrr
    Cincinnati Bengals that's the team were gonna cheer to victory
    Touchdown Bengals!!
    Put some points up on the board and win a game for Cincinnati!

    Who Dey, Who Dey, Who Dey think gonna beat them Bengals
    Who Dey, Who Dey, Who Dey think gonna beat them Bengals
    Who Dey, Who Dey, Who Dey think gonna beat them Bengals
    Who Dey, Who Dey, Who Dey think gonna beat them Bengals

    Noooooobodyyyyy

    When Cincinnati made the playoffs, the Hudepohl beer company jumped on the Who Dey bandwagon with their own version in Hu Dey Beer.




    Who they think is going to beat them Bengals. Quickly changed to Who Dey think is gonna beat dem Bengals.
     
  8. Tunescribe

    Tunescribe PatsFans.com Supporter PatsFans.com Supporter

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    #61 Jersey

    Thanks for the perspective and for setting the record straight with your detailed historical account.
     
  9. Franchise12

    Franchise12 On the Game Day Roster

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    So It's a black thing to say "WHO DEY" when you have thousands of white fans and players saying it? Whos putting the gun to their heads? . Your more racist than your pathetic claims of marvin lewis' "reverse racism". As much as I dislike T.O.'s antics I had to side with him after superbowl 39 when he said "If Brett Favre came back from injury like I did he'd be considered a warrior, but since its me I have to be selfish." True isnt it. Thats the REAL racism in this league.When pete carrol was coach, didnt alot of the the fans and players copy his whole "jacked and pumped" phrase I guess that was "white culture".

    Or could the celebrations just be co- opted by being excited that they scored. Dillon did his little donkey dance yesterday I guess that was black culture although I've never seen a black person do that before outside of corey and lomo. you're a little too uptight for someone who'd rather not be politically correct.
     
  10. mongoloido

    mongoloido Rookie

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    Heh. It's interesting this is written about. My guess is the person wondering about racism is a New England native, where accents tend to be different. Around the Midwest, I think more people consider "who dey" to have more of a redneck sound to it than any sort of African American connotations.
     
  11. Tunescribe

    Tunescribe PatsFans.com Supporter PatsFans.com Supporter

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    #61 Jersey

    No, I'm from the Midwest originally and it's not redneckspeak. It's black slang vernacular. (Subsequently saw the video/song it was taken from which confirms this.)
     
    Last edited: Oct 9, 2006
  12. Tunescribe

    Tunescribe PatsFans.com Supporter PatsFans.com Supporter

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    #61 Jersey

    Re-read the original intent of this thread Mr. Holier-Than-Thou, and then go back to your navel-gazing. You don't get it and probably will remain incapable. Rudy did an excellent, non-judgmental job of shedding light on this subject, which was much appreciated as I mentioned. Yet, you still feel it necessary to jump in late and play righteous crusader. Who's the "pathetic" one here?
     
    Last edited: Oct 9, 2006
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