Welcome to PatsFans.com

Armed Forces Journal...A failure in generalship

Discussion in 'Political Discussion' started by DarrylS, Apr 27, 2007.

  1. DarrylS

    DarrylS PatsFans.com Supporter PatsFans.com Supporter

    Joined:
    Sep 13, 2004
    Messages:
    43,183
    Likes Received:
    325
    Ratings:
    +816 / 27 / -33

    Article written by ARMY LT. COL. PAUL YINGLING is deputy commander, 3rd Armored Calvary Regiment. He has served two tours in Iraq, another in Bosnia and a fourth in Operation Desert Storm. He holds a master's degree in political science from the University of Chicago. I would guess he is not bucking for a promotion real soon, his analogies to the inability of the generals to adapt to Iraq as they did not in Viet Nam seems pertinent.Yingling says:"America's generals have been checked by a form of war that they did not prepare for and do not understand." I have contended all along that the US, its leaders and people are pretty much in the same situation we were not prepared for this long war and we as a country do not really understand their passion and religious/political divisions. We try to view it through western eyes, logic and mindsets and it just does not work in this scenario.

    http://www.armedforcesjournal.com/2007/05/2635198

    For the second time in a generation, the United States faces the prospect of defeat at the hands of an insurgency. In April 1975, the U.S. fled the Republic of Vietnam, abandoning our allies to their fate at the hands of North Vietnamese communists. In 2007, Iraq's grave and deteriorating condition offers diminishing hope for an American victory and portends risk of an even wider and more destructive regional war.

    These debacles are not attributable to individual failures, but rather to a crisis in an entire institution: America's general officer corps. America's generals have failed to prepare our armed forces for war and advise civilian authorities on the application of force to achieve the aims of policy. The argument that follows consists of three elements. First, generals have a responsibility to society to provide policymakers with a correct estimate of strategic probabilities. Second, America's generals in Vietnam and Iraq failed to perform this responsibility. Third, remedying the crisis in American generalship requires the intervention of Congress.....

    This article began with Frederick the Great's admonition to his officers to focus their energies on the larger aspects of war. The Prussian monarch's innovations had made his army the terror of Europe, but he knew that his adversaries were learning and adapting. Frederick feared that his generals would master his system of war without thinking deeply about the ever-changing nature of war, and in doing so would place Prussia's security at risk. These fears would prove prophetic. At the Battle of Valmy in 1792, Frederick's successors were checked by France's ragtag citizen army. In the fourteen years that followed, Prussia's generals assumed without much reflection that the wars of the future would look much like those of the past. In 1806, the Prussian Army marched lockstep into defeat and disaster at the hands of Napoleon at Jena. Frederick's prophecy had come to pass; Prussia became a French vassal.

    Iraq is America's Valmy. America's generals have been checked by a form of war that they did not prepare for and do not understand. They spent the years following the 1991 Gulf War mastering a system of war without thinking deeply about the ever changing nature of war. They marched into Iraq having assumed without much reflection that the wars of the future would look much like the wars of the past. Those few who saw clearly our vulnerability to insurgent tactics said and did little to prepare for these dangers. As at Valmy, this one debacle, however humiliating, will not in itself signal national disaster. The hour is late, but not too late to prepare for the challenges of the Long War. We still have time to select as our generals those who possess the intelligence to visualize future conflicts and the moral courage to advise civilian policymakers on the preparations needed for our security. The power and the responsibility to identify such generals lie with the U.S. Congress. If Congress does not act, our Jena awaits us.
     
  2. DarrylS

    DarrylS PatsFans.com Supporter PatsFans.com Supporter

    Joined:
    Sep 13, 2004
    Messages:
    43,183
    Likes Received:
    325
    Ratings:
    +816 / 27 / -33

    Lets see..today Friday 27, April..
    There are:

    27 Posts on Al Gore who might run for president
    11 Posts on Rosie who is unemployed
    24 on Katie Couric who is just a talking head
    12 On the Dems taking separate jets to a debate..

    Nothing on this guy, a warrior, a credible publication and a well thought out article..


    PRICELESS
     
    Last edited: Apr 27, 2007
  3. PatsWSB47

    PatsWSB47 Veteran Starter w/Big Long Term Deal

    Joined:
    Mar 13, 2007
    Messages:
    7,999
    Likes Received:
    105
    Ratings:
    +246 / 1 / -0

    #12 Jersey

    Come on everyone! I can't believe you forgot to log on to the armedforcesjournal.com site to see if there were any negative miltary articals to comment on!:eek:
     
  4. mr3putt

    mr3putt 2nd Team Getting Their First Start

    Joined:
    Jan 2, 2007
    Messages:
    1,524
    Likes Received:
    1
    Ratings:
    +1 / 0 / -0

    A great summary of the failure of this generation's military leadership to adapt to changing tactics and their failure to assert contrarian opinions in the face of political pressure.

    Armies are always prepared to fight the last war...not the next one.
    It is up to the generals to drive innovative thinking in the battlefields.
     
    Last edited: Apr 27, 2007

Share This Page

unset ($sidebar_block_show); ?>