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Are members of the Individual Ready Reserve civilians?

Discussion in 'Political Discussion' started by Pujo, Jun 1, 2007.

  1. Pujo

    Pujo Rookie

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    When someone finishes their active-duty or reserve comittment and are discharged from the military, they enter the Individual Ready Reserves, to be called upon if needed. Unless called up, they live completely civilian lives. Now a soldier is being charged with disrespectful behavior for three actions.
    1. He joined a war protest while wearing his uniform.
    2. He made an obscene comment to the investigating officer.
    3. He gave a speech, out of uniform, accusing Bush of war crimes.

    Now for 1 and 2, I could agree with a military punishment since he wore his uniform and disrespected an officer with jurisdiction over his case. But for #3, where he was not wearing a uniform, should he be punished? Once someone leaves the military, are they ever able to be civilians again, or can the military treat them as military personnel? Seems wrong.

    http://www.boston.com/news/nation/w...7/06/01/marine_probe_stirs_free_speech_issue/
  2. taltos

    taltos Rookie

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    This person was probably a first term enlistee. In this case he would go into the IRR after active duty until his obligated service period, generally 8 years was completed. While he is in the IRR he is subject to military authority and is supposed to keep his uniforms and him/herself in condition so that if recalled, he/she is good to go. I have heard of cases where someone has gotten into trouble with civilian authorities while in the IRR and have had this affect the character of their discharge. Political protests are one of the forbidden areas for one in the military. He will be a full civilian at the end of his obligated service period when his discharge will be sent to him.
  3. Pujo

    Pujo Rookie

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    That makes sense to me, if he was still within his period of comittment.
  4. FreeTedWilliams

    FreeTedWilliams pfadmins PatsFans.com Supporter

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    #75 Jersey

    As a federal employee, we are barred from speaking in public about ANY topic, and our free speech rights are also further impeeded by the Hatch Act. So I can only guess that the same is true for him.
  5. Pujo

    Pujo Rookie

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    As Taltos pointed out, he was likely within his initial period of commitment in which case I agree with both of you. But someone remains a member of the IRR beyond the term of their commitment (until a retirement age), so are you saying they be denied civilians' rights for their whole lives, even though they receive no pay or services from the military?

    By the way, the whole federal employees barred from speaking on any topic isn't true either. The government has to show a compelling need (and you obviously can't use information learned in your official capacity), but the government's not entitled to silence your private political speech.
    Last edited: Jun 1, 2007

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