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Another Bledsoe in NE Q.

Discussion in 'PatsFans.com - Patriots Fan Forum' started by DisgruntledTunaFan, Nov 21, 2006.

  1. DisgruntledTunaFan

    DisgruntledTunaFan Rookie

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    In Dallas, not only the OL, but the entire D has played significantly better since Romo stepped in.

    We're guessing it's b/c having to go up against a (more)mobile QB in practice, the front 7 can work on their pass rushing skills more, and the secondary has to work harder against a QB with a quicker release.

    Just out of curiosity, when Brady replaced Bledsoe, did you see these improvements in the NE D as well?
  2. PatsFan-NH

    PatsFan-NH Rookie

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    Well since nobody else has answered, I will give you my impression of the situation, but I don't have any stats for you.

    When Brady took over, it was more like everyone holding their breath. I am sure there are those who knew about him, and were fine, but most who didn't worried. The more he played and the more we won, the more relaxed things got. But once Drew was better there was a real controversy about which QB to go with. Drew had been here a long time and had a lot of supporters.

    When he started he was this young stud with a great arm. And he grew into the job year after year, and we were happy. But at some point he was no longer the 'boy wonder' he was supposed to have arrived. But we still had problems in terms of winning and moving to the elite level.

    It was always just out of reach and wait til next year. He still had the great arm, and the experience, but it seemed to me that most of the time he was detached from the whole situation. It was like he expected to go out and do X,Y,Z and he would and if it didn't work out, it wasn't his fault or his problem. When he couldn't make things happen on the O, it left a mess for the D, and wore them out.

    It seemed that at some point he had gone from learning his job to protecting his image, and he wouldn't take any risks. He was very methodical and mechanical and wouldn't change. Now there were a few times when he played like he was on fire. When he broke his thumb, and then when he was dealing with it while healing. But those were rare, he just would never step up most of the time.

    I knew for a while that there was something wrong with him, and many will talk about his not being able to move and making the wrong throw at the worst times. Indeed there are many on the board who can be very technical about his problems.

    For me it was a lack of heart. I couldn't put a name to it, until Doug Flutie came back into the league. He was up in Buffalo and we would see their games, or clips on the news. Flutie wanted to win so bad that he didn't worry about looking foolish, or tarnishing his image. If it gave his team a chance he would try it.

    Drew in contrast did what was expected and played it safe. I know that he has the crazy gunslinger aspect, but to me the gunslinger and playing it safe are one in the same. If he thought a QB of his stature and experience should make X throw, he would, regardless of the situation on the field, and of what the team needed. His decisions seemed to have little to do with what was going on in the game, so to many he was a gunslinger, but I always felt it was because he was afraid to take a risk and do something different from the script - even when the situation demanded it.

    With Bledsoe the team wasn't one unit, it was a bunch of separate parts, and each had problems with their jobs. Some games one unit would work better than the other, and some games it worked well enough to win. But we never kept getting better, it was usually a hodge-podge.

    Once Brady took over it seemed that the team became one unit and helped and complemented each other. Perhaps because they had this untried rookie and felt he needed extra help or the team wouldn't survive. But it soon became apparent that Brady could do the job, and yet the team still kept working as one. Each unit got better and they worked as one, and miracles of miracles things started to go our way. :D

    I don't think we would have ever even won one SB with Drew, and that is sad to say.
  3. Mr.0bese

    Mr.0bese Rookie

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    I think this is an interesting question and since we aren?t using stats I?ll throw my two cents in. I thought Bledsoe had lost something toward the end of his stay here. Early in his career I can remember him coming to the line in a pressure situation with a grin on his face, he exuded confidence and he knew he would get the job done. That seemed to disappear and be replaced with frustration when things didn?t go right. I never thought that Bledsoe was a conservative quarter back or that he didn?t take chances on the contrary, many times he tried too hard to make plays that just weren?t there. To get back to the question, it appeared to me that the team was always waiting for Bledsoe to make a play and when Brady came in they started to step up. I not sure why, maybe they felt they had to with a rookie QB at the helm or maybe Brady is just a better leader, I don?t think it had any thing to do with the skill sets of the two player because I think they are the same type of quarter back, of course Brady is far better then Bledsoe but at that time I don?t believe the difference was as great as it is today.
    I am and will always be a Bledsoe fan and credit him with turning this franchise around. I have given him the benefit of the doubt trough-out his career believing that the constant rotation of offensive coordinators and systems affected him in NE and that the Bills OL was so poor that no QB could succeed up there. I think it time I admit to myself that he is only a mediocre QB and his biggest down fall may be leadership. Romo seems to inspire players as does Brady, Bledsoe does not, they bring an expectation of winning that makes others play better around them, and Bledsoe doesn?t. I think you can achieve this, for a short time when your team struggles and you make a leadership change like replacing a QB or a head coach but when you are able to maintain it over years, like Brady has, that?s greatness.
  4. JoeSixPat

    JoeSixPat Rookie

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    I'm not sure if the QB can ever be given any credit for the play of the Defense, aside from the fact that if they are on the field for 40 minutes a game they are going to get very tired.

    Bledsoe's tendencies in Dallas were evident here, but I think they've grown much more pronounced over time, as he's aged.

    While it was never a secret that he was a strict pocket passer who needed well above average OL protection to be effective, and it was also well known that he tried to force too many passes holding onto the ball too long, the biggest thing in my eyes was his exceptionally poor pocket presence.

    Unlike Brady, Bledsoe never had a sense for who or what was coming out of his periphery - this makes for the biggest difference... Brady knows when the pressure is coming, moves up in the pocket, or around the pocket, and will get rid of the ball - Bledsoe can't/won't do those things.

    Aside from that, when Brady came in they kept the offense very simple - dink and dunk passes for the most part, using that to set up the run. The defense may have stepped up knowing they had a rookie at QB but overall the 2001 SB was a full team effort, with Brady just not making very many mistakes - which is the biggest plus of all.

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