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30 old pc ads that will blow your processor

Discussion in 'Political Discussion' started by patsfan13, Nov 10, 2011.

  1. patsfan13

    patsfan13 Hall of Fame Poster PatsFans.com Supporter

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  2. Patters

    Patters Moderator Staff Member PatsFans.com Supporter

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    That's hilarious. I can store four photos from my camera for less than $12,000!
  3. patsfan13

    patsfan13 Hall of Fame Poster PatsFans.com Supporter

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    I remember lugging the Fujitsu 480 MB Eagle drives around they were 20k a pop in the mid 80's..... bundled with a Sun workstation you were look at 100k+

    :D
  4. The Brandon Five

    The Brandon Five Rookie

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    #75 Jersey

    Thank God the government passed laws requiring the cost of storage to come down. I mean, where we would we be now without that?
    Last edited: Nov 10, 2011
  5. Patters

    Patters Moderator Staff Member PatsFans.com Supporter

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    Yeah, Al Gore never would have had a chance to invent the internet if it wasn't for those laws.
  6. IcyPatriot

    IcyPatriot ------------- PatsFans.com Supporter

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    #87 Jersey

  7. cupofjoe1962

    cupofjoe1962 Rookie

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    I started working on a old RCA computer that filled about 1,000, sf and
    had 256k of memory.

    Attached Files:

  8. wistahpatsfan

    wistahpatsfan Rookie

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    In high school, our science teacher brought in his brand new TRS-80 with 4k storage. We all thought he was a dork and a bit crazy. We learned about the binary system and wrote some crude programs. Played a lot of pong. It was another dozen years before I touched another computer.

    [​IMG]
  9. PatsFanInVa

    PatsFanInVa PatsFans.com Supporter PatsFans.com Supporter

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    My dad, who died in the 70s, worked on the/an ENIAC - yes, vacuum tubes.

    In high school, a rich guy left our town's school system "the computer." So you could go in "the computer room" and putz around in BASIC. There was one "monitor" where you could see motion (we called it the CRT, i.e., cathode ray tube... i.e., monitor.) We had dumb terminals and you had to work looking at the little printout on paper coming out to see what you were doing. I don't remember whether there were monitors that only showed text... maybe. It's running together w/subsequent memories.

    I pissed off my high school for writing a software program that predictably said to bet the Cowboys to cover the spread against the Broncos that year. They thought it was this incredible magic thing that "I got the computer to know the right answer," but of course it was a function of a bunch of stats and simple (and way too simplistic) formulae, getting a flip of the coin right, basically.

    The school was mad because other parents were mad they were promoting gambling.
    Last edited: Nov 11, 2011
  10. patsfan13

    patsfan13 Hall of Fame Poster PatsFans.com Supporter

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    My first work was as a test engineer for the E&S PS2 system:

    [​IMG]


    It was a terminal and used a PDP 11 as a host:

    [​IMG]


    The graphic inputs for the system were really well thought out. They had a tablet, joystick, programmable function keys and a set of dials for manipulating 3d objects. Very advanced for the time.

    The graphics were vector lines.
  11. Wolfpack

    Wolfpack Banned

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    Here's Harry Boy's first computer. It cost him $22,000.

    [​IMG]
    Last edited: Nov 11, 2011
  12. PatsFanInVa

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    That was the i-bacus. You could buy a competitor with counters that were plain wood and not rounded for 10K, but, well, you know, that wouldn't be the same.
  13. PatsWSB47

    PatsWSB47 Rookie

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    #12 Jersey

    I laughed out loud:singing:
  14. Michael

    Michael Moderator Staff Member PatsFans.com Supporter

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    In the 80s I worked on a Genigraphics workstation.

    [​IMG]

    It was built around a DEC PDP11. It used those 300 MB hard drives in your op. They looked like cake dishes. The best part was you refreshed the screen by hitting a button. It took so long to redraw you would work for 5-10 minutes just remembering where things were. And it was about a 10 step process just to rotate something. Macs just made it all to easy. :D
  15. patsfan13

    patsfan13 Hall of Fame Poster PatsFans.com Supporter

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    What type of graphic apps were you doing?


    I used to know how to boot the PDP using the switches for the boot commands into the registers :)


    Most of out stuff was sold through Grumman Data Systems for design CAE work to Grumman Boeing and the like for aircraft design.
  16. PatsFanInVa

    PatsFanInVa PatsFans.com Supporter PatsFans.com Supporter

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    Glad you liked it... but that model got fried by the Y1K bug :(
  17. PatriotsReign

    PatriotsReign Rookie

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    I got you all beat...in the 80's I worked on the Illudium Q-36 Explosive Space Modulator....

    I'm still waiting for the "Ka-Boom"...there was suposed to be an earth-shattering kaboom!!

    Attached Files:

  18. PatsFanInVa

    PatsFanInVa PatsFans.com Supporter PatsFans.com Supporter

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    Here's something that's not meant to be about anybody posting here, but it's an interesting perspective that sort of got "stirred up" by seeing the pics of the actual people here at their early workstations.

    Okay we were all around when the state of the art was definitely here, but with some competition, in the whole tech arena.

    Now we're in a situation where code-writers say they can't make a living here - that there are some jobs still left here, but that increasingly those jobs get done elsewhere, or by people from elsewhere working here, at a comparatively low wage (contrasted, within a single career,) with a situation where the sky was the limit in terms of prosperity if you were an engineer coming out of school.

    My reaction to the pictures is a lot like I feel when I see pictures of auto-workers in the heyday of detroit, many decades ago. Everything looks very solid, very immutable... I expect the story to be that the machines change, but that the U.S. worker in the picture will be doing something more advanced to get to a future where the jobs are, of course, the "future" of American jobs.

    I'll stop there. I don't want to get all "analytical" about it and just have the same old arguments... I imagine we'll just have them anyway, but it's just an interesting instant emotional reaction to the nostalgic pics here.
  19. patsfan13

    patsfan13 Hall of Fame Poster PatsFans.com Supporter

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    There was a book I remember about that called "Crossing the Chasm"

    http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0060517123/mikeleeorg-20


    It brought up a couple of points, things that were specialized (high value added) products over time transition to commodity product so the innovation required to produce them is reduced. This of course also reduces prices and increases value to consumers.

    A lot of tasks that required programmers can now be done by end users. I worked for a company that sold graphics software for scientist, it was Fortran libraries that sold for tens of thousands of dollars and required that you create each program to display scientific data. They sold another program that allowed you to take data from a DEC VAX minicomputer (cost ~1000k +) and make line and bar charts. It could cost up to 250k to run on a VAX cluster. Now Mathematica and Charting built into MS Excel of the Open Office can do far more without any programmers needed. Same with creating user interfaces web pages ect.

    Data that could take a year to format and present can be done in hours and at a cost that is lower by a factor of 1k.....

    Now 1 year olds can play with computers (iPad).

    Technology is and has always been a process of creative destruction.

    The downside is that the salesmen don't make 200k a year selling the stuff.
  20. PatsFanInVa

    PatsFanInVa PatsFans.com Supporter PatsFans.com Supporter

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    One interesting implication, let's stay way way at the forest level:

    You have a level of innovation, that level of innovation drives some employment, then the task is again progressively automated. Now office drones can make charts with Excel, where a long time ago, you needed a guy on a million dollar machine to make them.

    Okay cool. That's good. All the things we want cost less, because machines essentially do more of the work every day.

    Yet (of course) we get money to buy these wonderful new cheap things from doing work.

    Leaving aside tasks that have repeatedly resisted automation to that extent -- say, unclogging individuals' toilets and the like -- where does the work come from, eventually?

    I know, luddite perspective. The pat answer is, well, we invent more stuff. So there will always be a leading edge of tech workers, who can make it to tech management in their niche, before being completely obsolete and being spit out by the machine.

    Outside that cadre with the currently in vogue skill, we'll continue to have comparatively undesireable labor -

    We'll always need communicators.

    Right now we need a lot of skilled medical care workers (but watch out, when boomers are dying -- there will be a glut.)

    We always need a small number at the forefront of tech, which, by its nature, winnows the top tier starting with the moment they do something well.

    Then there's the clogged toilets. Maybe cabs (don't count on it,) maybe restaurant workers (also sort of depends, but a decent bet.)

    Outside of that, it's way more of a crap shoot than we acknowledge.

    Even assuming that the constantly forecast death by peak oil doesn't come to pass, what are the 1-year-olds working i-Pads going to make?

    Is there, in fact, a built-in engine of unemployment that's more powerful than the engine of employment represented by innovation?

    Perspectives?

    PFnV

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