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10 things Coke, Pepsi and soda industry won’t say

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  1. DisgruntledTunaFan

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    10 things Coke, Pepsi and soda industry won?t say - 10 things - MarketWatch
    10/13/13
    10 things Coke, Pepsi and soda industry won’t say

    The hard truth about soft drinks


    1. “Energy drinks aren’t for everyone.”

    Energy drinks often seem to target young people, with rock concerts, skateboarders and surfers featuring prominently in their advertising. But the City of San Francisco filed a lawsuit on Monday alleging that one company has gone a step too far. It accuses Monster Energy of marketing its caffeinated beverage to minors as young as six. The lawsuit alleges that Monster “targets children and teenagers by promoting a ‘lifestyle’ that features extreme sports, music, gaming, military themes and scantily-clad ‘Monster Girls.’”

    “Monster Energy is unique among energy-drink makers for the extent to which it targets children and youth in its marketing, despite the known risks its products pose to young people’s health and safety,” San Francisco City Attorney Dennis Herrera said on Monday. Monster disputes the allegations. The lawsuit’s allegations are “demonstrably false” and Monster will “vigorously defend” the action, a spokeswoman for the company said in a statement. They appear to be motivated by publicity rather than fact or science, she said. “Monster — as it has repeatedly said — does not market to children,” she added.

    The lawsuit follows a decision by the Food and Drug Administration last week to investigate the effects that food and beverages high in caffeine have on young people. Maureen Beach, a spokeswoman for the American Beverage Association, says energy drinks have been “enjoyed safely” in the U.S. for more than 15 years and around the world for over 25 years.

    For their part, other drinks companies also say they are careful about their marketing. 5-Hour Energy (manufactured by a company that is not a member of the ABA) is a 1.93 fluid ounce “shot” rather than a “drink” and is only marketed to adults as a dietary supplement, says Elaine Lutz, a spokeswoman for 5-Hour Energy. Lutz says 5-Hour doesn’t market its products to children and does not recommend individuals take more than two shots a day (spaced several hours apart).
     
  2. DisgruntledTunaFan

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    10 things Coke, Pepsi and soda industry won?t say - 10 things - MarketWatch
    10/13/13

    2. “Caffeine and alcohol make a dangerous ****tail.”

    Too much of something is rarely a good thing — especially when it comes to uber-caffeinated energy drinks. The number of people showing up at emergency rooms reporting symptoms like racing heartbeat, seizures and headache after drinking energy drinks soared from 10,000 to more than 20,000 from 2007 to 2011, according to a survey of hospitals released last month by the federal government’s Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration. Most of those visits were made by teens or young adults, it said.

    “We’re seeing more and more people coming in with these issues, especially young people who are mixing their energy drinks with alcohol,” says Tom Sugarman, emergency physician and spokesman for the American College of Emergency Physicians. And it’s not just youngsters: Sugarman recently gave advice to a mother who complained that her baby never slept; it turned out, she was drinking energy drinks while breastfeeding. “That’s going to go straight to baby,” he says.

    ------------------------------------------

    Because many energy drinks are considered dietary supplements, the manufacturers are required to report fatalities with potential connections to the products to the FDA. As of March 6, 2013, there was one report of an individual who drank the dietary supplement and energy drink Rockstar Energy before dying, there were 13 reports of deaths possibly involving 5-Hour Energy, and eight death reports mention Monster. There’s no way to know whether the drinks and the fatalities are causally connected, industry pros say. Both Monster and 5-Hour say the filing of such reports doesn’t mean a product caused the fatality. (Rockstar Energy did not respond to requests for comment.) Monster is changing its label to a conventional food, but it has told the FDA that it intends to continue to voluntarily file adverse event reports after the conversion.
     
  3. DisgruntledTunaFan

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    10 things Coke, Pepsi and soda industry won?t say - 10 things - MarketWatch
    4. “Coke made Santa fat.”

    Coca-Cola has been often credited with creating the modern image of Santa Claus: The rosy-cheeked fellow with plenty of girth appeared as part of its advertising as early as the 1930s. The old-fashioned version of St. Nicholas, the European saint on whom Santa is based, is depicted as more svelte. But amid growing concerns about rising obesity rates, Santa’s size has begun to take on a new implications. “Soda continues to be blamed for obesity, and proponents of obesity-reduction programs continue to clamor to tax the beverage,” the Mintel report states.

    Rising consumption of sugary drinks has been a major contributor to the obesity epidemic, according to a 2012 report published by the Institute of Medicine. Some 26% of American adults defined themselves as obese in 2011, according to the Well-Being Index calculated by market research group Gallup and health-care consultancy Healthways. And too much sugar consumption is one of the most direct causes of Type 2 diabetes, says Margo G. Wootan, director of nutrition policy at the Washington, D.C.-based nonprofit Center for Science in the Public Interest. In fact, drinking one to two sugary drinks per day increases the risk of Type 2 diabetes by 26%, a 2010 study published by the Diabetes Journal found.
     
  4. DisgruntledTunaFan

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    10 things Coke, Pepsi and soda industry won?t say - 10 things - MarketWatch

    5. “Diet drinks aren’t health foods.”

    The bad news: Diet soda may not be good for you either. One recent study by French researchers published in The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition found a strong correlation between diet drinks and increased risk of Type 2 diabetes. Women who drink “light” beverages tend to consume 43% more than women who drink normal sugary drinks — the study found. Furthermore, when consumed in equal quantities, artificially sweetened drinks were associated with an increased risk of developing diabetes.
     
  5. DisgruntledTunaFan

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    10 things Coke, Pepsi and soda industry won?t say - 10 things - MarketWatch
    6. “We’re caffeine-dependent.”

    Energy drinks are the new kid on the block in the beverage industry, stealing market share from traditional sodas, experts say. In fact, sales of energy drinks are expected to grow from $12.5 billion last year to $21.5 billion by 2017, according to the market research group Packaged Facts. Soft-drink companies have their own energy brands. Coca-Cola sells NOS, PepsiCo has Amp Energy and Dr Pepper Snapple owns Venom Energy.

    But the caffeine content of energy drinks has caught the attention of the Food and Drug Administration. The FDA caps permissible caffeine levels in soft drinks at 200 parts per million, or 0.02%, which is the equivalent of around 72 milligrams in a 12-ounce can.

    However, there are no such restrictions on energy drinks and, an FDA spokeswoman says, some may contain more than the FDA’s recommended allowance per serving. “To date, no regulatory limit has been set for the amount of caffeine in other types of drinks, although the FDA has received several petitions requesting such a regulation,” a spokeswoman says.

    One 16-ounce can of Monster Energy, one of the most popular energy drinks on the market, has around 160 milligrams of caffeine (vs. 38 milligrams in a 12-ounce can of Pepsi) and it isn’t unusual for users to consume multiple drinks in a day.
     
  6. DisgruntledTunaFan

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    10 things Coke, Pepsi and soda industry won?t say - 10 things - MarketWatch

    9. “Our charitable donations wind up in strange places…”

    A report released in March by the nonprofit Center for Science in the Public Interest says that soda companies donate to charitable causes that might otherwise be highly critical of the industry. The report alleges that the industry’s donations to two major anti-hunger groups, the Food Research and Action Center and Feeding America, for instance, raise questions about those agencies’ “longstanding ties to food and beverage companies.”

    Such relationships between corporations and nonprofits, some public-health advocates say, can create a conflict-of-interest gray area. Case in point: These two groups stand alongside the soft-drink industry in opposition to regulations that would bar the use of the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program — formerly known as food stamps — to purchase sugary drinks, says the CSPI’s Jacobson. Critics wonder whether these organizations support the use of SNAP benefits to purchase soda if they weren’t getting donations from the soda industry. In separate statements, both groups say they’ve consistently opposed restrictions on SNAP because there are better ways to tackle obesity. Furthermore, they say, accepting donations from the beverage industry doesn’t contradict or compromise their missions.

    A spokesman for Coca-Cola says the company spent $45 million on community organizations last year. “The suggestion that our community philanthropic efforts are motivated by something other than goodwill is grossly inaccurate,” she says. A PepsiCo spokeswoman says the company supports “a wide array of organizations that work in the communities” it serves.
     
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    10 things Coke, Pepsi and soda industry won?t say - 10 things - MarketWatch
    10. “…including with doctors and dentists.”

    The very organizations that should be giving tips advising people to drink more water and less soda are also accepting money from soda companies, according to the study by the Center for Science in the Public Interest. It says the soft-drink industry has given money to groups representing doctors, dentists and dietitians, which it alleges has made it more difficult for them to give impartial advice. “Beverage companies are using strategic philanthropy to protect their images and profit,” the study reports.
     
  8. Claremonster

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    redbull vodka ftw :rocker:
     
  9. Tunescribe

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    #61 Jersey

    An ex-girlfriend of mine loved drinking espresso martinis. She got ripped pretty quick. (At $15 a pop, I was not a fan of them.) I never tried the alcohol-caffeine combo.
     

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