Last updated on June 28, 2004 6:15 AM EDT

DISCLAIMER:

I will NOT pretend that this information will be 100% correct. The information on this site can ONLY be as accurate as the press reports that the information comes from.

I would like to thank Pats39, Peachhead, Jim S, Chris Matthews "CJ", Ian Logue, Andrew Brecher, Jocelyn Robichaud, Naren99, Ickster, Tom Sweeney, AdamJT13, Pats726, and Paul Dalrymple. Each of them have in their own way provided invaluable assistance and guidance. Please note that NONE of them are responsible for errors on this page.

NTLBE/LTBE Credit/Debit System Explained - On DenverBroncos.Com there was an interview with Coordinator of Football Administration Mike Bluem. Here's part of the interview

"What is the cap for 2002?
The cap for 2002 is $71,101,000. But for us, it's actually a little bit more. We got a credit because we were charged more for incentives than were actually earned. When that happens, the league will net out the difference and credit the amount to the team for the next season. If a team spends more than it was charged then the league deducts that amount from the cap the next year. In our case, the Broncos were charged more in incentives than the players earned, so we got about a $3.3 million adjustment on our cap this year. Thus, our salary cap figure for this year is $74, 466,876, which is the second highest in the league only to Indianapolis.

Explain the credit and debit system against the cap?
Basically there are two types of incentives built into player contracts - likely to be earned and non-likely to be earned. Likely incentives are based upon whether or not a player accomplished a feat the previous year. If a player makes 50 catches one season and he has an incentive that requires him to make 49 receptions the next season, it is a likely incentive because he accomplished that the previous season. Likely incentives are charged against the cap immediately. Non-likely incentives are charged against the cap only if the player achieves them. If a guy had 50 catches last year and in his contract this year he has an incentive clause that kicks in if he makes 51 catches, it's a non-likely incentive because he didn't do it the previous year. At the end of the season you take the likelys that were actually earned and add to it the non-likelys that were earned. That figure is subtracted from what you were charged on the cap for the likely incentives. In our case, we were charged about $3.3 million more than what we actually had to pay the players and that's why we get a credit on the cap this year."

While the above two paragraphs talked about the Broncos, the Patriots' cap was charged $59,154 in 2004. Is there any wonder why Scott Pioli is a rising star in the NFL??

Eric Alexander I am presuming that the Patriots gave all of their UDFAs a $1,000 signing bonus.

Joe Andruzzi - From Patriots.Com "As they have in the past, the Patriots rewarded a player for solid production by giving guard Joe Andruzzi a three-year contract extension. According to Tom Curran of the MetroWest Daily News, Andruzzi's extension is worth $3.55 million and includes a $550,000 signing bonus."
February 17, 2004 Update On 1/28 the Charlotte Observer reported that Andruzzi's 2004 cap number was $1,068,500.
March 9, 2004 Update For the longest time the NFLPA site has been listing his 2004 salary as $925,000. It is now listed as $1,200,000 so I have added $275,000 to Andruzzi's cap number.

Tom Ashworth I am presuming that the Patriots gave Ashworth a $380,000 tender offer.

Rodney Bailey ESPN.Com's John Clayton reported that "The Patriots put in a one-year, $1.3 million offer sheet on defensive end Rodney Bailey that includes a $650,000 signing bonus. The Steelers have seven days to match. If they don't match, the Patriots have to surrender a sixth-round pick."

Tully Banta-Cain - The Boston Globe's Nick Cafardo reported on 7/21 that "Banta-Cain, a defensive end/ linebacker from Cal, agreed to a four-year deal, but he has an undisclosed injury that may delay his Patriots debut."
July 22 updateFrom ESPN.Com: "Signing bonus: $30,750. Base salaries: $225,000 (2003); $305,000 (2004); $380,000 (2005); $460,000 (2006, includes escalator). Total: four years, $1,400,750. Cap charge: $232,687."

Tom Brady - From CBS Sportsline's Signing status of AFC 2000 draft picks. Signing bonus: $110,000. Base salaries: $193,000 (2000); $275,000 (2001); $358,000 (2002). Total: three years, $864,400. While CBS Sportsline lists Brady's signing bonus as $110,000, ESPN.Com's Len Pasquarelli listed Brady's 2002 cap figure as $399,833, which would mean that his prorated signing bonus is $12,833 since it would be mean that his signing bonus was $38,400, which seems to be the more reasonable number for a 6th-round pick. I remembered recently in a Boston Globe article that Brady had earned about $70,000 in playing-time incentives this year.
May 9, 2002 update - AdamJT13 in a post to the Patriots NG wrote:"Brady's cap number is $432,873. He has a $375,000 base salary, a $12,833 prorated signing bonus, a $5,040 workout bonus and $40,000 in LTBE incentives (which formerly were NLTBE)."
August 29, 2002 update - From the Boston Globe - "Brady received $4 million of the bonus when he signed the contract, and that will be added to his $375,000 salary for the season. On the first day of the 2003 season, the Patriots have the right to exercise a $6 million option for the rest of the bonus. The contract runs through the 2006 season, and is structured similarly to Richard Seymour's. He signed a two-tiered bonus last year."
September 2 update - From the Boston Herald - "As part of his five-year, $30.52 million deal, Brady will earn $250,000 for every AFC championship and an additional $250,000 for every Super Bowl win he is the quarterback for. He won't receive any bonus money for making his second Pro Bowl, but every Pro Bowl selection thereafter will earn him $500,000. An NFL MVP award is also good for $500,000, while an NFL Offensive MVP award will net him $250,000. Brady received a two-tiered signing bonus worth a total of $9.5 million ($3.5 million this year and $6 million next March). He will keep his $375,000 base salary this year before his salary jumps to $3.1 million in 2003, $5.5 million in 2004, $5.5 million in 2005 and $6 million in 2006.Brady's cap number is only $1.075 million this season. His cap charge jumps to $5.3 million in 2003, $7.7 million in 2004, $7.7 million in 2005 and $8.7 million in 2006. The high cap numbers later in the deal will likely force a restructuring in a few years."
September 4, 2003 update From ESPN.Com's Len Pasquarelli - "The contract extension signed by New England Patriots quarterback Tom Brady last week is worth more than $30 million in so-called "new money" and keeps his salary cap number more than palatable for this season before escalating dramatically in cap value in its later years. According to NFL Players Association documents obtained by ESPN.com, the third-year veteran received a signing bonus of $3.5 million but kept his 2002 base salary at $375,000, the amount negotiated in his initial rookie contract in 2000. His salary cap value for 2002 is just $1.091 million. But after this year the value of Brady's contract, and the cap charges, spiral upward. Brady is due a $6 million option payment next March (March, 2003) to trigger the remainder of the contract. The base salaries for the four-year extension portion of the deal then become $3.125 million (2003), $5.5 million (2004), $5.5 million (2005) and $6 million (2006). The final season also includes $500,000 in incentives. There are workout bonuses of $5,600 each for 2003 and '04 and $6,160 each for '05 and '06. The total "new money" is $30.148 million. ...The future salary cap charges: $5.33 million ('03); $7.705 million ('04); $7.706 million ('05); and $8.706 million ('06). The term "new money" refers to the total value of the contract, minus what Brady was due under his original deal. The per-year average for the extension is a whopping $7.537 million."
March 26, 2003 update It appears that Brady restructured his contract sometime during late March. The Ickster posted on the KFFL forum that "the NFLPA website is now listing his (Brady) base salary at $450K, where it previously was listed at $3.125M. The $2.675M was probably guaranteed and treated as signing bonus, spread at $668.75K per season over the remaining 4 years of his deal. In short, the move clears $2,006,250 of room on the 2003 cap." I would like to thank the Ickster for pointing out Brady's restructure to the rest of the Patriots fan community.
March 27, 2003 update ESPN.Com's Len Pasquarelli reported that "the maneuver further increases Brady's already lofty cap values for the 2004-2006 seasons by about $670,000 each year. The new cap values for those years become roughly $8.374 million each for 2004-05 and $9.374 for 2006".
December 1, 2003 update Brady's 2003 cap number is $3,323,450 ($450,000 base salary, $2,868,750 signing bonus proration, $4,700 workout bonus) with an additional $500,000 in NLTBE incentives. Brady's 2004 cap number currently is $8,374,350 ($5.5 million base salary, $2,868,750 signing bonus proration and $5,600 workout bonus) with an additional $500,000 in NLTBE incentives. His cap numbers are $8,874,910 for 2005 and $9,374,910 for 2006.

Deion Branch Tom Curran of the Providence Journal provided some details of Branch's contract while quoting Alan Herman, Branch's agent - "We finally worked out the five-year deal with $3 million worth of incentives, which will kick in during the fifth year if he meets the performance levels in his first four seasons." The incentives are based on receiving yards. Herman wouldn't be specific, but he did say that 900 yards is one of the first plateaus for Branch to hit. With Troy Brown, David Patten and Donald Hayes in the mix at wide receiver and fellow rookie Daniel Graham at tight end, it'll likely be a while before Branch gets enough balls to get 900 yards. Branch's deal includes $1,025,000 in signing bonus. His salaries are the second-round minimums -- $225,000, $300,000, $380,000, $455,000 and $545,000."

Troy Brown July 28 update - From the Boston Globe "The Patriots and wide receiver Troy Brown have agreed on a restructuring of the 10-year veteran's five-year, $12.5 million deal. Though terms were not available, Brown will get a signing bonus that will put his earnings for this season more in line with the top receivers in the game, while the Patriots get some cap relief.". July 30 update - "Troy Brown's new deal pays him $750,000, with a signing bonus of more than $2 million. Brown is now paid like a No. 1 receiver, after 10 seasons. Some of his incentives have been turned into guaranteed money."
August 13 update - ESPN.Com's Len Pasquarelli - "It was hardly a blockbuster deal, but ESPN.com has confirmed that the New England Patriots recently tweaked the contract of Troy Brown to get the Pro Bowl wide receiver roughly $800,000 more in compensation for 2002 and to create $567,000 in additional salary cap funds for this season. The club gave Brown, who caught 101 passes in 2001, a signing bonus of $1.9 million but also reduced his base salary from $1.15 million to $650,000, which is now guaranteed. There was some minor bookkeeping done for the 2003 and 2004 seasons, which raised the salary-cap charges for those years by $533,000 and $1.23 million, respectively, but the contract was not extended. Depending on their cap situation, the Patriots might attempt to extend the deal beyond 2004 at some point during the season." My take on what happened - The Pats by guaranteeing Brown's salary are now able to prorate it over 3 years. The Pats also converted $400,000 in roster bonuses and/or incentives into guaranteed money thereby obtaining the ability to prorate that over 3 years.

Before Restructure
Salary1,150,000 
Prorated Original Signing Bonus510,000 
Roster Bonus/LTBE incentives 600,000 
Offseason Workout Bonus 55,040 
Total 2,315,040 
After Restructure
Salary216,667 (650,000/3)
Prorated Original Signing Bonus 510,000 
Prorated New Bonus633,333(1,900,000/3)
LTBE incentives200,000 
Guaranteed Roster/Reporting Bonus 133,333 (400,000/3)
Offseason Workout Bonus 55,040  
Total 1,748,373 

The above scenario fits what was written about the restructure by both Len P. and Cafardo.
3/17/03 update - The NFLPA site used to report Troy Brown's salary as $1,750,000. It now reports it as $755,000 so it appears that the Patriots converted $955,000 of Brown's old salary into a signing bonus in order to save $497,500 on the cap.
http://www.nflpa.org/members/playerProfile.asp?ID=19859
December 1, 2003 update Troy's 2003's cap number is $2,451,433 ($755,000 base salary, $1,640,833 signing bonus proration and $55,600 workout bonus). Troy's 2004's cap number currently is $5,146,434 ($2.25 million base salary, $1,640,833 signing bonus proration, $55,600 workout bonus, $500,000 roster bonus and $700,000 in incentives).
February 26, 2004 update According to a post on the PatsFans.Com message board the hosts of the Patriots.Com's radio reported that because Troy did not reach some incentives his 2004 cap number was $3.9 million. This would mean that Troy's 2004's cap number would now be $3,946,434 ($2.25 million base salary, $1,640,833 signing bonus proration, and $55,600 workout bonus).
May 26, 2004 update From the Boston Globe - "Players Association documents confirm that the Patriots reworked Brown's contract last week and extended it a year, to 2005, for bookkeeping purposes, creating a savings of $745,000. Brown had been scheduled to earn $2.25 million in base salary this year; the Patriots guaranteed $1.49 million, reducing his base salary to the minimum ($760,000), and prorated it over the next two years, essentially guaranteeing his return for a 12th season. Brown's cap number for this year went from $3,946,434 to $3,201,434, but his cap number next season stands at $5,751,160, with a $2.5 million roster bonus."

Wilbert Brown I am presuming that the Patriots gave Wilbert a $455,000 tender offer.

Ted Bruschi - Details of Bruschi's contract were found on Patriots.Com - "New England reportedly has taken care of one of its potential unrestricted free agents, inking linebacker Tedy Bruschi to a three-year extension worth a reported $4.6 million, according to CBS.sportsline.com....The deal reportedly included a $2 million signing bonus."
March 3, 2003 update - "Bruschi got a $2 million signing bonus for his three-year extension last January. His cap number this year is $1,522,266 ($850,000 base salary,$666,666 prorated signing bonus and a $5,600 workout bonus).Next year, he has an escalator clause that will raise his base salary from $1.1 million to $1.75 million if he participated in 58 percent of the snaps in 2002 or does so in 2003.
March 9, 2004 update Bruschi must have reached his escalator clause since his 2004 salary is now listed on the NFLPA site as $1.75 million.
June 17, 2004 update Mike Reiss of the MetroWest Daily News reported: "The contract extension signed by Patriots linebacker Tedy Bruschi includes a $3.5 million signing bonus and amounts to a four-year, $8.1 million deal...The deal includes base salaries of $700,000 in 2004, $850,000 in 2005, $1.35 million in 2006 and $1.7 million in 2007." My take is that Bruschi's extension save the Patriots $175,000 ($1,050,000 decrease in salary offset by $875,000 increase in prorated signing bonus) in cap space. From the Boston Globe - "In the final two years of the deal, Bruschi, who represents himself, can make another $250,000 if his playing time reaches 50 percent and $250,000 more if it reaches 70 percent."

Jeff Burris - Burris' $760,000 salary is eligible for the Minimum Salary Benefit for Veteran Players as laid out in the CBA extension. Therefore, Burris' salary is going to take up only $455,000 of cap space.

Matt Chatham -I am presumimg that the the Patriots had tendered Chatham the lowest RFA tender which provides the Patriots the right to match an offer and, if they don't, they will not receive any compensation as Matt Chatham was not drafted.
April 14, 2003 update - The Ickster posted on the Patriots KFFL forum - "According to the NFLPA site Chatham has signed a 3-Yr contract with base salaries of $450K (2003), $535K (2004) and $540K (2005). Those are all minimum salaries, so Chatham likely received a small signing bonus as well. By signing the 3-Yr extension, Chatham's cap number will likely go down since any bonus will be spread over the contract. He had previously counted for $605K on the Patriot's cap, which was the RFA tender amount. If he received a signing bonus of around $150K (Just a guess) on his 3-Yr deal, his new cap number would only be $500K, a savings of $105K on the cap in 2003. I would like to thank the Ickster for pointing out Chatham's deal to the rest of the Patriots fan community.
August 25, 2003 update Further research on this issue has convinced me that Chatham received a $192,000 signing bonus.

Je'rod Cherry - Cherry's $660,000 salary is eligible for the Minimum Salary Benefit for Veteran Players as laid out in the CBA extension. Therefore, Cherry's salary is going to take up only $455,000 of cap space. Please note that Cherry has $75,000 of his salary guaranteed.

Mike Cloud - Cloud's $535,000 salary is eligible for the Minimum Salary Benefit for Veteran Players as laid out in the CBA extension. Therefore, Cloud's salary is going to take up only $455,000 of cap space.

Cedric Cobbs - Until Cobbs signs, I have decided to show what last year's 128th pick, Bryant McNeal got - Signing bonus: $267,500. Base salaries: $225,000 (2003); $305,000 (2004); $380,000 (2005). Total: three years, $1,177,500. Cap charge: $314,167.

Rosevelt Colvin -  ESPN.Com's Len Pasquarelli reported that "Although most reports had the Colvin contract as a seven-year, $30 million deal, NFLPA salary documents show it at six years, $25.85 million. Essentially, for a veteran some people felt was the premier player in the unrestricted pool, the Patriots paid only the going rate for a linebacker, a little over $4 million annually. There is a $6 million signing bonus and base salaries of $550,000 (for 2003), $2.1 million (2004), $2.6 million (2005), $3.6 million (2006), $4.6 million (2007) and $5.5 million (2008). There are additional incentives of $300,000 each for the final three years."
April 21, 2004 update Noticed today that Colvin's 2004 salary was now listed as $535,000. As a part of a reply to my PatsFans.Com message board post Adamjt13 reported that "Colvin got a $1.565 million salary advance (prorated at $313,000 per season), with the remaining $535,000 fully guaranteed. His new cap number is $1,853,600 (he also has $300,000 in NLTBE incentives). The renegotiation reduced his cap number by $1,252,000". This restructure adds $313,000 to Colvin's cap figures for the next 4 years.

Rohan Davey ESPN.com's Len Pasquarelli reports the New England Patriots have signed rookie QB Rohan Davey to a four-year, $1.69 million deal that includes a $330,000 signing bonus. He'll have base salaries of $225,000 (2002), $300,000 (2003), $380,000 (2004) and $455,000 (2005)

Don Davis Davis' $660,000 salary is eligible for the Minimum Salary Benefit for Veteran Players as laid out in the CBA extension. Therefore, Davis' salary is going to take up only $455,000 of cap space.

Corey Dillon Michael Smith reported: "Dillon, who turns 30 in October, has two years remaining on a five-year, $26.1 million deal. He was to earn base salaries of $3.3 million this season and $3.85 million in 2005, but to facilitate the trade, he agreed to a restructure that included a reduced base salary for this year. He can make up the difference through not-likely-to-be-earned incentives". Pro FootBall Weekly reported that Dillon agreed to a "restructured deal that reduced the base salary on the remaining two years of Dillon's deal while including incentives, that were termed by Feldman (Dillon's agent) as "easily reachable." None of the money is guaranteed." Jaguars.Com's Senior Editor Vic Feldman provided more details - "Corey Dillon's salary for this year was reduced to a $1.75 million base, with incentives that could take it back to $3.3 million."
April 21, 2004 update Michael Smith reported:"This year Dillon can make $100,000 for reaching 700 rushing yards and $150,000 for 850 yards. He makes $375,000 for hitting the 1,000-yard mark and another $375,000 for each additional 150 yards up to 1,599. He'll take home $500,000 if he gets to 1,600." Basically, Dillon will earn $100,000 if he rushes for at least 700 yards; $250,000 - 850 yds; $625,000 - 1,000 yds; $1,000,000 - 1,150 yds; $1,375,000 - 1,300 yds; $1,750,000 - 1,450 yds; $2,250,000 - 1,600 yds. Adamjt13 reported that Dillon will earn $105,600 in offseason workout money making his 2004 cap figure $1,855,600.

Players with Dead Money Cap Hits of less than $10,000Shawn Mayer - $3,334;Chad Lee - $500; Phil Crosby - $5,600; Sean McDermott - $5,600, Frank Moreau - $5,600

Jack Fadule I found Fadule's $230,000 salary on the NFLPA site.

Scott Farley I found Farley's $230,000 salary on the NFLPA site.

Christian Fauria From a 6/9 Boston Globe article - "The Patriots got a little cap space (a little more than $300,000) while giving Christian Fauria a little added security last week. They added a year to the tight end's contract and guaranteed part of his base salary for this season. Fauria was entering the final year of the three-year deal he signed in 2002 and was to count $1,272,268 against the cap. The Patriots extended him through 2005 (with no bonus) and gave him $340,000 of his $1 million salary up front, reducing his cap charge to $968,934. Fauria is scheduled to earn the 10-year minimum ($765,000) and count more than a million against the cap next year, when he'll be 34."

Kevin Faulk From ProFootballTalk.Com - "Kevin Faulk will get $15.05 million over six years from the Patriots, including a $1.95 million signing bonus. His three-year take is $6.05 million." As listed on the NFLPA.Org site Kevin Faulk's salaries are as follows: (2004 - $550,000; 2005 - $1,400,000; 2006 - $1,900,000; 2007 - $1,900,000; 2008 - $2,400,000; 2009 - $2,900,000) His workout bonuses are $55,600, $106,160, $106,160, $106,720, $106,720 and $106,720. For the seasons 2007 through 2009, Kevin Faulk has a $500,000 roster bonus. He also has $250,000 in incentives each season -- NLTBE in 2004 and 2005, LTBE in 2006 through 2009. His cap numbers are $930,600, $1,831,160, $2,581,160, $3,081,720, $3,581,720 and $4,081,720.

Ryan Ferguson I am presuming that the Patriots gave all of their UDFAs a $1,000 signing bonus.

Lawrence Flugence I found Flugence's $230,000 salary on the NFLPA site.

Randall Gay I am presuming that the Patriots gave all of their UDFAs a $1,000 signing bonus.

Chas Gessner I found Gessner's $305,000 salary on the NFLPA site.

David Givens It was reported that the Patriots gave a $380,000 tender offer.

Brandon Gorin I found Gorin's $380,000 salary on the NFLPA site. According to Adamtjt13, THE salary cap guru on Internet's football forums, "At least 11 teams have taken advantage this season of the rule that allows teams, in essence, to move unused salary cap space from one season into the next.Salary cap rules state that any incentive added after the start of the regular season — no matter how unreachable — is automatically deemed Likely To Be Earned and immediately counts against the cap. The amount is prorated over the remaining years of the contract, which is why the loophole is most often used with a player in the final year of his contract. The rule makes it possible for teams to add unreachable incentives late in the season, thereby using up any leftover cap room. Since the money is charged against the cap but never paid to the player, the team is credited back that amount the following season — effectively pushing cap space from one year into the next. A number of teams, including but not limited to Philadelphia, Denver, Detroit and Seattle, have used this tactic in the past. But it hasn’t previously been used as frequently as it was this season, and never to the extent that Minnesota used it. The Vikings gave themselves an extra $10 million of cap room in 2004 by adding a $6 million incentive to Everett Lindsay’s contract and a $4 million incentive to Fred Robbins’ contract. It should be noted that, in many cases, the cap room pushed into 2004 will be partially offset by earned incentive charges carried over from 2003. A team’s cap adjustment, which determines how much more or less than the set salary cap a particular team can spend, is the total of all credits and charges carried over from the previous season.

Here are the 11 teams known to have used this loophole in 2003, the amount they pushed into 2004 and the players involved —

--AdamJT13"

Adamjt13 more than graciously provided this supplement- "The incentive itself was for $6 million and was added to Gorin's contract on Dec. 26. Since incentives added to the cap after the start of the regular season are prorated, the Pats were charged $3 million for 2003 and $3 million for 2004. Gorin also got a $2,500 bonus, prorated at $1,250 each season. That left the Patriots $3,802 under the 2003 salary cap. In 2004, the Patriots will be credited back the $3 million they were charged in 2003 for the unearned incentive. Since they'll also be charged another $3 million for the 2004 proration, they'll just re-do his contract at some point,removing the proration."
January 21 - Adamjt13 confirmed that the incentive was recalculated making it NTLBE.
January 21 - Michael Felger reported:"Meanwhile, the Pats were able to pull off a shrewd salary cap maneuver to carve out more space in 2004. When the Pats released Milloy, they saved roughly $3 million against the 2003 cap, a figure that sat unused for much of the year. But instead of having that go to waste, the Pats exercised a loophole that allowed them to push those savings to next year. Here's how they did it: Backup tackle Brandon Gorin was given a one-year extension and a $3 million ``likely to be earned'' incentive on top of his 2003 salary. So-called ``LTBE'' incentives go on that season's cap, so the Gorin bonus chewed up the remainder of the Pats' 2003 cap room. The incentive dealt with special teams tackles, which Gorin wasn't going to achieve because he doesn't play on kick teams. Under NFL rules, ``LTBE'' incentives that aren't achieved are given back to the team as a credit the next season. So the Pats will now be credited with $3 million for 2004. ``It was one of those things where it made sense for everyone,'' said Gorin's agent, Joe Linta. ``We got another year and a little signing bonus and they addressed some of their things.'' It's a loophole that several teams have used, except the Pats never took advantage of it until Belichick and Pioli started running the cap. Owner Robert Kraft also deserves credit for allowing his people to move that money to 2004 and maximize their salary cap dollars. Kraft could have easily let the money sit and pocket the savings down the line."

Daniel Graham - Signing bonus: $1,425,000. Base salaries: $800,000 (2002); $1,000,000 (2003); $1,200,000 (2004); $1,400,000 (2005); and $545,000 (2006). Notes: Team can exercise option of $2,775,000 next spring on '06 season. If team exercises option then base salaries are reduced to $300,000 (2003); $450,000 (2004); and $530,000 (2005). Total: five years, $6,825,000. Cap value: $1,085,000.

Jarvis Green I emailed Jarvis' agent, Albert Elias, asking for details on his client's contract. I would like to THANK Albert for responding so quickly and more importantly providing an excellent breakdown of his client's deal. Jarvis received the following deal:"Signing bonus: $245,000. Base salaries: $225,000 (2002); $300,000 (2003); $380,000 (2004) Total: three years, $1,150,000. Jarvis can earn up to $110,000 in incentives. NLTBE incentives - $30,000 (2002);$35,000 (2003);$40,000 (2004). According to Albert, Jarvis "can earn either: 30, 35, or 40 over three years or earn a lump sum of 110,000 w/ 70% playtime over 2 years;it is capped at 110,000. For example, if Jarvis earns his 2002 playtime incentive of 30k and does not earn it in 2003 but earns it in 2004 of 40k he would earn 70k. However, I built an additional "escalator" in the deal that would allow him to earn a one time 110k. So given the above scenario if he hit the 110k pt, he would earn 110K instead of 70K but it is capped at 110K. What this does is to protect him if in one the three years he was injured or did not play."
July 19, 2002 Update - From the Providence Journal...he (Jarvis Green) can make $35,000 in incentives in each of the first two years of the deal and $40,000 in the third year if he reaches playing-time incentives (15 percent of defensive plays in the first year; 30 percent in years two and three) and the defense improves in one of three categories. The three categories are total defense net yards allowed (the team was 14th in the AFC and 24th overall last year), average net yards per rush (10 and 21 last year) and average net yards per pass (12th and 19th)."
March 29, 2004 Update - It appears that Jarvis Green reached his $40,000 incentive for the 2004 season. I think that it is a guaranteed roster bonus.

Bob Hallen - Bob Hallen signed a two-year deal that included a $175,000 signing bonus.

Rodney Harrison - On 3/13 Nick Cafardo of the Boston Globe wrote - "Harrison ended up with a six-year deal worth $14.5 million with a $2.5 million signing bonus and a base salary this upcoming season of $655,000, the veteran minimum. That averages out to $2.41 million a year over the life of the contract and leaves Harrison with a cap figure of a little more than $1 million this season after his prorated bonus is added to his base pay."
March 14, 2003 update ESPN.Com's Len Pasquarelli reported that "Harrison signed a six-year contract worth $14.45 million, but no one expects him to play more than two or three years of the deal. His signing bonus was $2.5 million and, in the first three years of the package, he will earn $6.655 million."
March 17, 2003 update The Boston Herald's Kevin Mannix reported that "Safety Rodney Harrison's deal with the Pats calls for a $2.5 million signing bonus this year as well as $250,000 roster bonuses in 2004 and 2005. His base salaries are $655,000 this year, followed by $1.45 million, $1.55 million, $2.12 million, $2.7 million and $3.8 million."

Marquise Hill -   From ESPN.Com "The 63rd player selected overall, and the final pick of the second round, Hill will sign a five-year, $3.075 million contract, a deal that included a signing bonus of $1.15 million. Base salaries are the league minimums for all five years: $230,000 (2004), $305,000 (2005), $385,000 (2006), $460,000 (2007) and $545,000 (2008). Salary cap charge: $460,000.

Larry Izzo - Izzo's cap figure comes from CBS Sportsline's article on his signing "Izzo, 26, signed a four-year, $2.183 million contract. It includes a $275,000 signing bonus and base salaries of $477,000 each 2001-2004". Please note that the 2004 minimum salary for a player with Izzo's experience is $660,000. So, before March 3, Izzo's salary will be raised from $477,000 to $660,000 and his offseason workout bonus will increase from $5,200 to $5,600. The effect of these two changes will increase Izzo's 2004 cap number from $600,950 to $734,350.

Michael Jennings I found Jennings's $230,000 salary on the NFLPA site.

Bethel Johnson From ESPN.Com - "Johnson received a signing bonus of $1.75 million and base salaries of $274,000 (2003), $342,000 (2004), $410,000 (2005), $478,000 (2006) and $546,000 (2007). There is also an escalator clause that could increase the base salary for 2007 if Johnson reaches some prescribed playing time levels.
The Boston Globe's Nick Cafardo reported on 7/21 that "both second rounders, cornerback Eugene Wilson of Illinois and receiver Bethel Johnson of Texas A&M, signed five-year deals. Wilson received a $2 million signing bonus, salaries of $274,000, $342,000, $410,000, $478,000, and $546,000, and the potential of a $3 million payment before his fifth season based on playing time and performance over the first four years. Johnson received a similar deal, except for a slightly lower ($1.75 million) signing bonus."
July 22, 2003 update From ESPN.Com - "Signing bonus: $1,750,000. Base salaries: $274,000 (2003); $342,000 (2004); $410,000 (2005); $478,000 (2006); $546,000 (2007, includes escalator). Total: five years, $3,800,000. Cap charge: $624,000."

Ted Johnson -  Salary figure comes from using the NFLPA search feature. Cap figure reported in Nick Cafardo's article listing the 2001 cap figures for most of the 2001 roster. According to the Boston Herald here's the cap consequences of releasing TJ in 2001:
"Consider Johnson. His cap number goes to $6.2 million in 2001. If the Pats release him prior to June 1, he'll count even more than that, $7.11 million. If they make Johnson a post-June 1 casualty, the hit computes out to $2.37 million in 2001 and $4.74 million in 2002". Since Ted Johnson agreed to a pay cut for the 2001 season, the amount of unamortized signing bonus left after the 2001 season did not change. Ted Johnson earns a $1 million roster bonus on March 15, 2002. Before Ted Johnson agreed to a pay cut, the Ickster posted the following: "TJ's 2002 number is made up of $3.1M in base salary, $1M roster bonus, $2,371,250 in bonus amortization, $100K in workout bonus, $5,600 in workout bonus for participation in program(56 workouts at $100 each).That is a cap number of $6,576,850.".
February 19, 2003 Update - According to ESPN's John Clayton, Ted Johnson's 2003 cap number is $6.827 million.
February 27, 2003 update - According to ESPN's John Clayton, "the Patriots restructured the contract of middle linebacker Ted Johnson to keep him on the team. At the threat of being released if a deal wasn't reached by 4 p.m. eastern Thursday, Johnson reached a revised three-year, $4.8 million deal that included a $1.4 million signing bonus. Johnson was scheduled to make $4.45 million this year and his cap number was $6.827 million. The new deal lowers his cap number to $3.679 million, a savings of $3.189 million." On 2/28 Nick Cafardo supplemented Clayton's report with "Johnson's cap number went from $6.8 million to $3.679 million. His compensation for the upcoming season was cut in half. Scheduled to earn a $3.35 million salary and $1 million roster bonus tomorrow, Johnson received a $1.4 million signing bonus and a veteran's minimum salary."
March 3, 2003 update - Ted Johnson (two-year extension, $1.4 million renegotiation bonus)
Old cap number: $6,827,250
New cap number: $4,843,516 ($800,000 base salary, $2,371,250 old signing bonus proration, $466,666 new signing bonus proration, $1 million roster bonus due March 14, $5,600 workout bonus and $200,000 in unspecified incentives/other)
September 17, 2003 updateAs part of a 9/14 Nick Cafardo article - "Biggest cap jumps for the Patriots next year: Tom Brady, $3.3 million to $8.4 million; Willie McGinest, $2 million to $5.6 million; Troy Brown, $2.4 million to $5.1 million; Rosevelt Colvin, $1.55 million to $3.1 million; Ty Law, $8.8 million to $9.4 million; Rodney Harrison, $1.1 million to $2.1 million; Tyrone Poole, $1.1 million to $1.9 million; Antowain Smith, $2.3 million to $3.9 million; Mike Vrabel, $2.1 million to $3.7 million. One that goes down: Ted Johnson, from $3.6 million to $1.9 million."
February 6, 2004 update As part of a 2/6 Michael Smith article - "Ted Johnson: The days of the annual Johnson restructuring appear to be over. Due to make $900,000 next year, and his cap number is a shade under $2 million. Scheduled to receive a $400,000 roster bonus next month."

Kenyatta Jones - From ESPN.Com's Signing status of AFC 2001 draft picks. Signing bonus: $365,000. Base salaries: $209,000 (2001); $298,000 (2002); $389,000 (2003); $418,000 Total: four years, $1,679,000. I cut and paste the following from a Boston newspaper article - "Jones' deal features playing time incentives and salary escalators, rare elements of a contract for a fourth-round choice. Kenyatta Jones was waived halfway through the 2003 season. I am presumimg that his salary is as follows (375,000/17*8, or 176,471)

Ethan Kelly From ESPN.Com - "Signing bonus: $21,500. Base salaries: $225,000 (2003); $305,000 (2004); $380,000 (2005). Total: three years, $931,500. Cap charge: $232,167." Practice Squad Players make $4,350 a week.

Kliff Kingsbury On 7/21 the Boston Globe's Nick Cafardo reported that "also in the fold is Texas Tech quarterback Kliff Kingsbury, who signed a three-year deal with a $50,000 bonus and minimum salaries, and seventh-rounder Spencer Nead, a tight end from Brigham Young, who got a $25,000 bonus and a three-year minimum deal.

Dan Klecko From ESPN.Com - "The contract includes a $320,000 signing bonus. The base salaries are $225,000 (2003), $305,000 (2004), $380,000 (2005) and $460,000 (2006). The contract also features an escalator that could increase the 2006 salary based on playing time." Also from ESPN.Com, "in the deals signed this week by New England fourth-rounders Dan Klecko and Asante Samuel, some similar inducements (mechanisms, based on playing time, that would elevate the players' salaries in the fourth season of the contract) are included, with each player able to guarantee larger 2006 base salaries if they achieve certain play time benchmarks. Klecko can boost his 2006 salary from its scheduled $460,000 to one commensurate with the lower restricted free agent qualifying offer by playing 40 percent of the snaps in two seasons. It will escalate to a base salary equal to the middle (or first-round) qualifying offer if he plays 70 percent of the snaps in two of the first three seasons. Samuel has similar safeguards, although his benchmark for the second one is 75 percent of the snaps in two seasons.

Adrian Klemm - From CBS Sportsline's Signing status of AFC 2000 draft picks. Signing bonus: $1,225,000. Base salaries: $300,000 (2000, plus offseason workout bonus of $50,000); $325,000 (2001, plus offseason workout bonus of $50,000); $400,000 (2002, plus offseason workout bonus of $50,000); $475,000 (2003, plus offseason workout bonus of $50,000); $550,000 (2004). Total: five years, $3,475,000.

Dan Koppen - On 7/21 the Boston Globe's Nick Cafardo reported that the "Patriots also signed a four-year deal with fifth-round pick Dan Koppen, a center from Boston College, who received a $115,000 signing bonus to go with minimum salaries of $225,000, $305,000, $380,000, and $460,000. Koppen, the 164th player taken, also will have the opportunity to earn escalators in the first three years of the deal."
July 22, 2003 update From ESPN.Com - "Signing bonus: $116,000. Base salaries: $225,000 (2003); $305,000 (2004); $380,000 (2005); $460,000 (2006, includes escalator). Total: four years, $1,486,000. Cap charge: $254,000."

Justin Kurpeikis I found kurpeikis' $380,000 salary on the NFLPA site.

Ty Law -  Cap figures come from the above Pats39's post. "The 2nd-best deal a CB has ever received (behind Deion). Totaling 7 years - $48.1M without Pro Bowl and Super Bowl incentives, which are $250K each, every year. He received a $14.2M signing bonus, which counts for $2M until 2005. The rest of the money breaks down as follows:
1999 - $900,000 salary, a $500,000 reporting bonus, and a $100,000 offseason workout bonus
2000 - $1.4 million salary, plus a $500,000 reporting bonus and $100,000 offseason workout bonus
2001 - $2.4 million salary, $500,000 reporting bonus, and $100,000 workout bonus
2002 - $3.7 million salary with a $1 million reporting bonus and $100,000 workout bonus
2003 - $4.9 million in salary, a $1 million reporting bonus, and a $100,000 workout bonus
2004 - $5.65 million base salary, with a $1 million reporting bonus and $100,000 workout bonus
2005 - $8.75 million salary with a $1 million reporting bonus and a $100,000 workout bonus
Oh yeah, as an added bonus, Law receives the workout bonus even if he doesn't work out with the team. His program doesn't need to be supervised by the team." This year I included the Pro Bowl Bowl incentive of $250,000 as LTBE incentive since Ty Law made the Pro Bowl last year.
May 26, 2002 Update - Nick Cafardo wrote - "Bledsoe's cap hit will be the second-highest on the roster this season. The highest belongs to Ty Law, whose number is $6.84 million."
September 22, 2002 Update - The Ickster posted on the Patriots KFFL forum - "It would appear, from the NFLPA listing of his salaries, that Ty Law has restructured. The NFLPA lists his 2002 salary as $650K, where it used to be $3.7M:"
http://nflpa.org/members/playerProfile.asp?ID=22543
The most likely cause of this is that Law has restructured his contract, with the difference in base salary, $3.05M, being treated as bonus and spread over the final 4 years of his contract at $762.5K per season. This frees the Pats about $2.23M in 2002 but makes Law's future bonus amortization, which is already quite large, larger.
March 21, 2003 update According to the NFLPA Ty Law's 2002 cap number excluding workout bonus money was $4,710,188. I'm figuring that Law's 2003 cap figure would be the same as that except that I am including $105,600 for his offseason workout bonus money. I also included the increase in salary - $650,000 to $4,900,000 - a $4,250,000 difference. $4,710,188+$5,600+$4,250,000= $8,965,788.
June 11, 2003 update From the Boston Globe - "He (Ty Law) will earn $4.9 million in base salary this season; he'll count $8,806,965 toward the cap..."If there isn't another renegotiation of his original seven-year deal worth nearly $50 million (last year the Patriots guaranteed $2.9 million of his salary and spread it over the remainder of the contract, reducing his salary to $650,000), Law playing elsewhere could be the case very soon. Perhaps by 2004. He is due to earn base salaries of $5.65 million and $8.75 million in 2004 and '05, respectively, when his cap number rises to $9,457,365, then to $12,557,365."
December 1, 2003 update Law's 2003 year's cap number is $8,806,965 ($4.9 million base salary, $2,701,365 signing bonus proration, $1 million reporting bonus, $100,000 roster bonus and $105,600 workout bonus), with another $250,000 in NLTBE incentives. Law's 2004 cap number is $9,457,365 ($5.65 million base salary, $2,701,365 signing bonus proration, $1 million reporting bonus and $105,600 workout bonus), with another $500,000 in NLTBE incentives.
January 24, 2004 update Adamjt13 reported that "Law's cap number for 2004 could end up closer to $10.46 million after his incentives and escalators. He has NLTBE incentives of $250,000 in 2003 and $500,000 in 2004 and 2005 for making the Pro Bowl and winning the Super Bowl. If the Patriots win Sunday, he'd get the $250,000 for 2003, and the $500,000 for 2004 would become LTBE and would count against the cap. He also has an escalator clause in 2004 that raises his base salary by $250,000 for each year with a Pro Bowl and Super Bowl from 1999-2003. That would seem to raise his salary by $500,000, to $6.15 million. The LTBE incentive and salary increase would bring his cap number for 2004 to $10,457,365."
February 26, 2004 update Mike Felger reported on 2/26 "Law signed a seven-year deal in 1999 worth around $50 million, including a $14.2 million signing bonus and other incentives. Law has already collected more than $30 million from that deal and has not given anything back through renegotiation. The next two years, Law is set to earn $14.4 million in base salary ($5.65 million in 2004 and $8.75 million in 2005) and $2 million more in reporting bonuses. Law's contract also includes escalators that will pay him an additional $2.5 million for Pro Bowl and Super Bowl appearances he's made over the last five seasons. That means the magic number for Law is $18.9 million over the next two years. It's believed that any renegotiated contract would essentially guarantee Law that sum in salary and bonuses while adding additional years onto the deal to defray the salary cap charges."
February 26, 2004 update Adamjt13 reported that "Ty Law's contract already has been updated, and his new cap number is listed as $10,207,365 -- $750,000 more than it was. Of that, $500,000 is from an escalator clause (Pro Bowl and Super Bowl win) that raised his base salary to $6.15 million, and $250,000 is an incentive (Pro Bowl and Super Bowl win) that became LTBE. His incentive had been listed as a $500,000 NLTBE incentive, so his contract might have included a stipulation that if he reached the escalators, the incentive was decreased to $250,000. For 2005, his incentive bonus still is listed as $500,000, but he doesn't have an escalator clause for that year."

Situation 2004 Cap Cost 2005
Release or trade Law before 6/25,509,5300
Release Law after 6/1 but before the start of training camp2,807,5652,701,965
Trade Law after 6/1 but before the start of training camp5,509,5300
Release Law after the start of training camp but before 9/93,807,5652,701,965
Trade Law after the start of training camp but before 9/96,509,5300
Release Law after 9/9 and Law chooses to receive termination pay9,957,5652,701,965
Release Law after 9/9 and Law chooses not to receive termination pay3,807,565 plus whatever salary (347,059 a week) Law has earned 2,701,965
Trade Law after 9/96,509,530 plus whatever salary (347,059 a week) Law has earned0
Retain him for the 2004 and release/trade him before the 2005 season9,957,5652,701,965
Retain him for the 2004 and the 2005 seasons9,957,56512,808,125

Matt Light - From ESPN.Com's Signing status of AFC 2001 draft picks. Signing bonus: $1,305,000. Base salaries: $260,000 (2001); $325,000 (2002); $390,000 (2003); $455,000 (2004). Total: four years, $2,735,000.

Fred McCrary - The Naples Daily News reported that "McCrary said the deal will pay him slightly more per year than the $725,000 he was slated to make in San Diego in this, the final year of a four-year contract. San Diego released him on Feb. 28." I am guessing that McCrary signed a two year deal with a $300,000 signing bonus and that his salaries will be $530,000 in 2003 and $660,000 in 2004. That would give McCrary $1,490,000 over the two years which averages to be $745,000 average. Given that the Pats were under the cap on the 21st of March by $444,079, his 2003 cap number, $685,600, would allow the Pats to sign him without restructuring another player's deal or releasing a player since the net cap effect would be $385,600 as McCrary would displace the $300,000 salary of Tom Ashworth from the Top 51 list.
March 23 update - Len Pasquarelli reported on ESPN.Com that "McCrary, 30, will sign a two-year contract worth between $1.5 million and $1.7 million".

Shawn Mayer I believe that when Shawn Mayer was first signed by the Patriots that he was signed to a 3-year contract and received a $5,000 signing bonus. I am presuming that the Patriots gave Mayer a $305,000 tender offer.

Willie McGinest - Salary figure comes from using the NFLPA search feature.
In 2001 McGinest agreed to restructure his contract. Here are the details as found on the Globe: "The Patriots added two years to McGinest's contract when they renegotiated the deal a few weeks ago. McGinest's five-year, $25 million contract, which included an $8 million signing bonus, was to expire in 2002. Basically the new deal involved four years and $10 million, which reduced the cap number for this year from $7.2 million to $4.44 million. The Patriots took some scheduled roster bonuses that were worth $2 million over the next two years and tied them into a $3.861 million signing bonus and a $477,000 base salary. McGinest's cap number will rise to $8.367 million next year but drop to $5.65 million in 2003. It will be $10 million in 2004." According to a post made by the Ickster, here are the cap consequences of releasing Willie during the 2002 season:
"However, it is a misconception that most (McGinest's cap number) of it is base salary. His base salary is $3.4M in 2002. The remainder is made up by bonus amortization ( a little less than $3.8M), roster bonus ($1M) and workout bonus ($100K).
After next season the Pats are beyond the signing bonus amortization from his original contract, and are only subject to the bonus amortization from the bonus he received on his extension (about $3.4M spread over 6 years). If he were released prior to June 1 of next year he would be a dead money hit of over $6M in 2002. If released after June 1 he would be a dead money hit of about $3.8M in 2002 and $2.3M in 2003.
If McGinest plays well next year the team will likely restructure him again, lowering his cap number to about $6M for 2002. He then would play for the team in 2002 at that number, and would have about $1.15M in bonus amortization per season in the final 4 years of his contract. Starting in 2003, the team would be able to release McGinest without killing their cap if he doesn't perform to his contract.
If McGinest plays poorly this year, then he likely would be released in 2002 with the cap hits I mentioned above." Willie McGinest earns his roster bonus on March 15th.
March 9, 2002 update Mike Felger of the Boston Herald on 3/8 - McGinest was to make about $4.6 million in 2002 in salary and roster bonuses. He basically agreed to cut that figure in half, giving back more than $2 million. McGinest's cap figure, which was to be $8.3 million in 2002, will now be under $6 million."
May 26, 2002 Update - Nick Cafardo wrote - "Bledsoe's cap hit will be the second-highest on the roster this season. The highest belongs to Ty Law, whose number is $6.84 million. Third highest is Willie McGinest at $6.2 million"
November 4, 2002 Update - The Ickster posted that in 2003 Willie is due a $5 million salary and a $5 million roster bonus.
December 14, 2002 Update - The Ickster posted:

  1. On 2/3/02, ESPN's Len Pasquarelli wrote of McGinest:
    "His salary cap charge for 2002, as part of a megadeal signed in 1998 and which included a bonus of $10 million, is $8.288 million. After that his cap total escalates to $10.57 million for each of the seasons 2003-2006. The Patriots could mitigate those numbers but it probably would warrant converting base salary into upfront money, and New England management might be loathe to make such a commitment."
  2. Website NFLTalk.com (no longer available) reported on 3/19/01:
    "McGinest's extension adds 4 years/$10M to McGinest's contract with a bonus of $3.423M."
  3. From tracking salaries on NFLPA.com, I noticed that McGinest's salary dropped from $2.9M to the then $477K veteran minimum, a difference of $2.423M. That part was likely guaranteed and spread as bonus as part of his extension, and he was given an additonal $1M (probably a roster bonus which was guaranteed as well).

We know, from other reports:


February 19, 2003 Update - According to ESPN's John Clayton, Willie McGinest's 2003 cap number is $10.576 million.
February 28, 2003 Update - Here is an instance in which the Boston media report different things on the same deal. Kevin Mannix of the Boston Herald writes "McGinest, who was scheduled to count $10.5 million on the salary cap figure this season, now has a cap number of about $2 million for 2003 after signing a three-year, $9 million contract that includes a $3 million signing bonus as well as an additional $2 million in incentives." while Nick Cafardo writes "McGinest was scheduled to count $10.6 million against the cap. He was due a $5 million roster bonus tomorrow and a salary of $5 million for 2003. McGinest agreed to a four-year deal that could be worth up to $16 million, or $9 million for the first three years. He received a $3 million signing bonus, with the team saving $8.5 million. McGinest could earn another $6 million in incentives. The deal can be revisited after the third season." In this case, I am going with Cafardo's report because it makes more sense. Willie was already signed through the 2006 season so it is logical to presume that a restructure would also go through the 2006 season.
March 3, 2003 UpdateWillie McGinest (contract not extended, $3 million renegotiation bonus)
Cap number: $10,576,100
New cap number: $3,481,100 ($655,000 base salary, $570,500 old signing bonus proration, $750,000 new signing bonus proration, $5,600 workout bonus and $1.5 million in unspecified incentives/other)
September 3, 2003 update - On 9/2 the Boston Globe's Nick Cafardo reported - "Willie McGinest, whose cap number is manageable at slightly less than $2 million after a restructured deal, could see that soar to about $5.6 million next season when he's due a $500,000 roster bonus and has the chance to earn $2 million in playing-time incentives."
February 22, 2004 update ON 2/22 the Boston Globe's Michael Smith reported - "Willie McGinest, who is coming off a Pro Bowl season, will count $5.671 million toward the cap, though only $1.845 million is salary. The problem is he has $2 million in incentives built in and a $500,000 roster bonus due March 18.
March 3, 2004 update On 3/3 the Boston Globe's Michael Smith reported - "At the close of business Monday, the Patriots were $2.23 million under the cap, thanks in part to a minor restructuring of Willie McGinest's contract. He had $2 million in incentives counting against the cap this year; they merely treated them as "not-likely-to-be-earned" incentives that, if earned, would be charged against the 2005 cap. New England reduced McGinest's cap number from $5.671 million to $3.671 million.

Malaefou McKenzie I found McKenzie's $230,000 salary on the NFLPA site.

Josh Miller As listed on the NFLPA.Org site Josh Miller's salaries are as follows: (2004 - $660,000; 2005 - $700,000; 2006 - $770,000; 2007 - $800,000; 2008 - $850,000).

Lawyer Milloy - Salary figures comes from using the NFLPA search feature. Contract information came from Pats39's post to the Patriots Usenet newsgroup. "Milloy's deal is actually two different deals. The first part is a 4 year/$15M contract with a $6M signing bonus. The second half is a 3 year/$20M contract with a $2M signing bonus. After the 4th year, the Patriots have an option to void the remaining three years of the deal. If the team does not decide on the option before a certain date prior to the start of free agency, Milloy can decline the option and declare himself a free agent. For cap purposes, the $6M bonus gets spread over the full 7 seasons at about $857K per year. It is a very cap-friendly deal." I am guessing that Milloy will be receiving roster bonuses of 50,000 in 2000;100,000 in 2001, 2002, 2003; 400,000 in 2004, 2005 and 500,000 in 2006. The 50,000 roster bonus helps explain why Milloy's 2001 Cap figure was reported to be $1.36 MM. I am speculating that Milloy also received a $4,800 workout bonus this year and will be receiving the same in future years. Why $4,800. According to CBS Sportsline, Milloy's total compensation for the 2000 season was $6,504,800. $6MM of that figure came from his SB, $450,000 of that figure came from his actual salary. That leaves $54,800 unaccounted for.
October 21, 2001 update - It appears that Milloy restructured his contract sometime in 2001. For the longest time, the NFLPA player salary search feature listed Milloy's 2001 salary as $1,300,000. It now lists it as $477,000 so it appears that the Patriots converted part of his salary into a signing bonus. The move added $99,064 to Milloy's cap figures for the next 5 years. In one of his pieces after the Super Bowl, ESPN.Com's Len Pasquarelli wrote that Milloy's 2002 cap figure will be $3.562 million.
September 12, 2002 Update - It appears that Milloy restructured his contract sometime this month. For the longest time, the NFLPA player salary search feature listed Milloy's 2002 salary as $2,500,000. It now lists it as $525,000 so it appears that the Patriots converted $1,975,000 into a signing bonus, saving $1,580,000 on this year's cap while adding $395,000 to Milloy's cap figures for the next 4 years. I would like to thank the Ickster for pointing out Milloy's restructure to the rest of the Patriots fan community.
March 17, 2003 update The Boston Herald's Kevin Mannix wrote: "Why all the speculation about Lawyer Milloy's future in Foxboro? Strictly financial. Milloy restructured his contract a year ago, reducing his salary cap figure to $2.4 million for the 2002 season. This year that jumps to $5.6 million. After that his cap numbers escalate $1 million a year."
July 7, 2003 update According to USA Today, Milloy's 2002 cap number was $1,982,606. This is how I break down that figure:
525,000 - 2002 salary
857,142 - 2002 proration of the 2000 $6 million signing bonus
100,000 - roster bonus
6,000 - offseason workout bonus
99,064 - 2002 proration of the 2001 restructure
395,000 - 2002 proration of the 2002 restructure
1,982,606 - Total

This is how I break down Milloy's 2003 cap number:

4,400,000 - 2002 salary
857,142 - 2003 proration of the 2000 $6 million signing bonus
100,000 - roster bonus
5,600 - offseason workout bonus
99,064 - 2003 proration of the 2001 restructure
395,000 - 2003 proration of the 2002 restructure
5,856,806 - Total

September 2 update - Milloy's 2004 dead money hit will be $4,053,618.

Frank Moreau I found Moreau's $380,000 salary on the NFLPA site.

Aric Morris - From the Tennesean - His two-year deal includes minimum salaries in 2003 and 2004, along with a $25,000 signing bonus. Bechta said through incentives, including a $75,000 workout bonus and $200,000 in playing-time incentives, Morris could easily make $700,000 per season.

Christian Morton -  Until Morton signs, I have decided to show what last year's 233rd pick, Chance Pearce got - Signing bonus: $31,500. Base salaries: $225,000 (2003); $305,000 (2004); $380,000 (2005). Total: three years, $941,500. Cap charge: $235,500.

Gene Mruczkowski Gene was tendered a $230,000 salary.

Leonard Myers - From ESPN.Com's Signing status of AFC 2001 draft picks. Signing bonus: $55,000. Base salaries: $209,000 (2001); $298,000 (2002); $389,000 (2003); $418,000 Total: four years, $1,369,000.

Spencer Nead On 7/21 the Boston Globe's Nick Cafardo reported that "also in the fold is Texas Tech quarterback Kliff Kingsbury, who signed a three-year deal with a $50,000 bonus and minimum salaries, and seventh-rounder Spencer Nead, a tight end from Brigham Young, who got a $25,000 bonus and a three-year minimum deal.
July 22, 2003 update From ESPN.Com - "Signing bonus: $26,000. Base salaries: $225,000 (2003); $305,000 (2004); $380,000 (2005). Total: three years, $936,000. Cap charge: $233,667."

Stephen Neal I am presuming that the Patriots gave Neal a $455,000 tender offer.

Patrick Pass -I am presumimg that the the Patriots had signed Pass to a minimum salary deal. Pass has $75,000 of his salary guaranteed.

David Patten -In September, 2001 the Patriots extended David Patten's one-year deal by 3 years giving him a $1,000,000 signing bonus.
February 17, 2004 Update On 1/28 the Charlotte Observer reported that Patten's 2004 cap number was $1,506,000.
March 14, 2004 Update Mike Reiss of the MetroWest Daily News reported in a story entitled: "Does David Patten still have a place within the Patriots' wide receivers' corps?". The answer should become clear in the next few days, as the eight-year veteran is due a roster bonus of $250,000 tomorrow, according to a NFL source. If the Patriots pay the bonus, it would be an indication Patten is still very much in the team's plans. There's also the possibility of a restructured, or perhaps reduced, contract. Agent Mark Lepselter declined comment when asked about any negotiations with the Patriots, only offering, ``I've always believed the Patriots had a greater appreciation for David Patten than perhaps some in the media have.'' Patten's salary for 2004 is $1 million and the team would incur about a $1.5 million salary cap hit.

Lonie Paxton - On February 27 Mike Felger of the Boston Herald reported that "the Pats have made Lonie Paxton the highest-paid long snapper in the history of the NFL, signing the restricted free agent to a five-year deal worth more than $3 million." Mr. Snow Angel got a five-year deal at the minimum salaries (450, 535, 540, 545, 670), with a $305,000 signing bonus and standard workout bonuses ($5,600, $5,600, $6,160, $6,160 and $6,720, respectively).

Jason Perry - Perry's $535,000 salary is eligible for the Minimum Salary Benefit for Veteran Players as laid out in the CBA extension. Therefore, Perry's salary is going to take up only $455,000 of cap space.

Roman Phifer - Until further details become available, I am going to presume that Phifer signed a two-year contract (Providence Journal) for the minimum salary for a player with his experience. ESPN.Com's John Clayton - "Patriots coach Bill Belichick likes linebacker Roman Phifer and he showed it with the four-year deal Phifer signed last Friday. The deal primarily, thanks to a $300,000 guarantee in 2003, pays Phifer $2 million for playing this season or more than $4 million if he plays two seasons. Phifer, 34, was one of the many successful free agent finds of the Patriots in 2001 and became a valuable part of the Patriots' Super Bowl defense. Below are the salaries for Phifer according to the NFLPA.http://www.nflpa.org/members/playerProfile.asp?ID=18496
2002 -    750,000
2003 - 1,000,000
2004 - 3,000,000
2005 - 3,000,000
June 30, 2002 Update - ESPN.Com's Len Pasquarelli - "The four-year, $9.27 million contract that linebacker Roman Phifer signed with the New England Patriots last week not only rewards the 11-year veteran for reviving his career in 2001 but likely ensures he will play more than one additional season with the defending Super Bowl champions. According to NFL Players Association documents, Phifer received a signing bonus of $1 million as part of the new contract. But the contract also guarantees portions of his base salaries in the 2003 and 2004 campaigns, providing an additional $1 million the Patriots would have to pay if they released Phifer after the 2002 season....In addition to the $1 million signing bonus, Phifer will earn a base salary of $750,000 for 2002 and a workout bonus of $400. His base salary for 2003 is $1 million, with $250,000 of that guaranteed, and he is also due a $500,000 roster bonus next spring. His salaries for 2004 and 2005 are $3 million each, and if he is still playing then, those numbers probably will be renegotiated. Notable, though, is that Phifer is guaranteed $750,000 of his salary in 2004. In essence, including his 2002 base salary, Phifer is guaranteed $2.75 million in the deal, not bad for a veteran who only last spring wasn't sure if he would play again.
March 3, 2004 Update - JDSal45, a fellow PatsFans.Com poster reported: "I think I actually discovered something new, doing a little research on my own. I have been checking nflpa.org in recent days looking for restructures. As of yesterday, Roman Phifer was listed on that site as having salaries for the next 2 years of $3,000,000.00. This matches Miguel's info. A check of the site tonight shows Phifer with a salary of $760,000 for this year and $800,000 for next year. No info if he received any additional bonus money, but I gotta think he took a salary cut with some small performance bonuses." Here is the link: http://www.nflpa.org/Members/playerProfile.asp?ID=18496
April 3, 2004 Update - Phifer got a $490,000 renegotiation bonus. He has the standard workout bonuses of $5,600 and $6,160. In 2005, he has a $700,000 roster bonus and $500,000 in LTBE incentives. His cap numbers are $1,260,600 ($760,000 salary;$495,000 prorated signing bonus;$5,600 offseason workout money) in 2004 and $2,501,160 ($800,000 salary;$495,000 prorated signing bonus;$700,000 roster bonus;$500,000 LTBE;$6,160 offseason workout money) in 2005.

Tyrone Poole It has been reported that Poole was signed to a four year $8.024 million deal that included a $1.8 million signing bonus. From a 9/14 Nick Cafardo article - "Biggest cap jumps for the Patriots next year:....Tyrone Poole, $1.1 million to $1.9 million..."
November 30, 2003 update In 2004 Tyrone Poole is scheduled to receive a $445,000 roster bonus during the 1st week in March.

Tim Provost I found Provost's $305,000 salary on the NFLPA site.

David Pruce I found Pruce's $230,000 salary on the NFLPA site.

Buck Rasmussen I found Rasmussen's $230,000 salary on the NFLPA site.

Dexter Reid - Adamjt13 posted - "His cap number actually is $323,750. His signing bonus was $375,000. He has NLTBE incentives of $25,000 this season and $35,000 in each of the next three seasons, all based on playing time and certain team qualifications. He has a split salary this season, and his base salary in future seasons will drop to the applicable minimum if he doesn't get a credited season in a previous year. His workout bonuses are $6,160 for 2005 and 2006 and $6,720 for 2007."

P.K. Sam -  Until P.K.Sam signs, I have decided to show what last year's 164th pick, Dan Koppen got - On 7/21 the Boston Globe's Nick Cafardo reported that the "Patriots also signed a four-year deal with fifth-round pick Dan Koppen, a center from Boston College, who received a $115,000 signing bonus to go with minimum salaries of $225,000, $305,000, $380,000, and $460,000. Koppen, the 164th player taken, also will have the opportunity to earn escalators in the first three years of the deal."
July 22, 2003 update From ESPN.Com - "Signing bonus: $116,000. Base salaries: $225,000 (2003); $305,000 (2004); $380,000 (2005); $460,000 (2006, includes escalator). Total: four years, $1,486,000. Cap charge: $254,000."

Asante Samuel From ESPN.Com - "The former Central Florida standout signed a four-year contract with a signing bonus of $312,500 and the same base salaries as Klecko received ($225,000 - 2003; $305,000 - 2004; $380,000- 2005; $460,000 - 2006). His contract also includes an escalator clause that could boost his 2006 base salary if he reaches some predetermined playing time levels." Also from ESPN.Com, "in the deals signed this week by New England fourth-rounders Dan Klecko and Asante Samuel, some similar inducements (mechanisms, based on playing time, that would elevate the players' salaries in the fourth season of the contract) are included, with each player able to guarantee larger 2006 base salaries if they achieve certain play time benchmarks. Klecko can boost his 2006 salary from its scheduled $460,000 to one commensurate with the lower restricted free agent qualifying offer by playing 40 percent of the snaps in two seasons. It will escalate to a base salary equal to the middle (or first-round) qualifying offer if he plays 70 percent of the snaps in two of the first three seasons. Samuel has similar safeguards, although his benchmark for the second one is 75 percent of the snaps in two seasons.

Guss Scott -  Until Scott signs, I have decided to show what last year's 95th pick, Billy McMullen got - Signing bonus: $528,000. Base salaries: $225,000 (2003); $305,000 (2004); $380,000 (2005); $460,000 (2006). Total: four years, $1,898,000. Cap charge: $357,000.

Richard Seymour - From ESPN.Com's Signing status of AFC 2001 draft picks. "Signing bonus: $4,800,000. Base salaries: $1,200,000 (2001); $820,000 (2002, plus $3,200,000 option payment); $980,000 (2003); $960,000 (2004); $1,120,000 (2005); $1,220,000 (2006). Total: six years, $14,300,000. Base salaries for the first three seasons are guaranteed." "The 6-foot-6-inch, 299-pound defensive lineman from Georgia can make another $10 million in escalator clauses, but he would have be a Reggie White -type player to earn that over the life of the contract."
September 6, 2002 update - From the Boston Globe - "The team has recently tweaked the contracts of Mike Compton, Richard Seymour, and Antowain Smith to guarantee small portions of their base salaries (which prorates the portion of the contract affected and spreads it out over the length of the deal), but those adjustments haven't created major cap space." According to the NFLPA's web site, Seymour's salary is now $300,000 so it appears that the Pats converted $520,000 of Seymour's salary into a signing bonus, saving $416,000 on Seymour's 2002 cap figure while adding $104,000 to Seymour's future cap figures.
December 19, 2003 update From the Boston Globe - "There are no salary escalators based on performance in Seymour's contract until 2005 and 2006"
February 29, 2004 update From the Boston Globe - Richard Seymour "can earn up to $3.4 million in salary escalators next year and $6.8 million in the final year of the deal based on performance, playing time, playoff appearances, and Pro Bowls. The escalators aren't easy to achieve, even for a player of his caliber

Antowain Smith - While the exact details of the Antowain Smith's contract have not been revealed, Michael Felger of the Boston Herald reported that "As for Smith, his deal was reported to be for a total of $21 million, including a $5 million signing bonus. However, there were indications last night that those numbers were inaccurate.Smith's signing bonus is likely tiered, meaning he'll receive some of the money now and have the rest tied to an option bonus that would come due later in the deal. The salary cap number for Smith in the first few years of the contract are thought to be below $3 million a year". Nick Cafardo of the Boston Globe reported that "The Patriots offered Smith a fair market contract. There were no discounts, just a deal that was fair for everyone. The Patriots distributed the signing bonus over a few payments so not all of it counts against the cap this year." ESPN.Com's Len Pasquarelli reported that "Seems the contract tailback Antowain Smith signed Friday to remain with the New England Patriots, rather than test his value in the free agent market, is worth considerably less than reported. The five-year deal was trumpeted as a $21 million contract with a signing bonus of $5 million. The actual signing bonus is $3 million, and while the contract is indeed for five years, its structure makes it more like a three-year pact worth about $2.75 million annually. About the only way Smith would ever collect $21 million, Patriots sources said, is if he goes to the Pro Bowl all five years and reaches every incentive in the package." Nick Cafardo of the Boston Globe reported on 3/4 that "Antowain Smith's five-year, $21-million deal with the Patriots had a two-tiered signing bonus of $5 million. The first amount - $3 million - was given to Smith at signing. He will receive a $1 million salary the first season, making his compensation the first year $4 million. The remaining $2 million of the signing bonus is payable before Year 3 as part of an option bonus that kicks in the remaining three years of the contract."
More on the Antowain Smith deal from Len Pasquarelli - "Number crunching: While on the subject of contracts for free agent running backs, it's notable the five-year deal that brought Antowain Smith back to the New England Patriots isn't worth anything close to the $21 million that was reported. Even if one assumes Smith plays all five years of the contract and earns the $9.51 million due him in the final two seasons, the contract still totals $17.53 million. In truth, it is structured as a three-year contract, totaling $8.02 million. The signing bonus is $3 million and Smith's base salaries for the first three seasons are $900,000 (2002), $1.4 million (2003) and $2.4 million (2004). There are offseason workout bonuses of $105,600 in each year. Even the three-year total isn't bad for a guy who was out of work for several weeks last summer and who came back to rush for 1,157 yards. But the $21 million figure that was floated earlier this month when Smith re-signed was grossly inflated."
AdamJT13 supplemented Pasquarelli's report in the Patriots newsgroup with: "Pasquarelli left off a $500,000 option payment for 2004 due in 2003, a $2 million option payment for 2005-06 due in 2004 and $250,000 in LTBE incentives in 2004. Including everything, it's a five-year deal for $20.278 million."
September 6, 2002 update - From the Boston Globe - "The team has recently tweaked the contracts of Mike Compton, Richard Seymour, and Antowain Smith to guarantee small portions of their base salaries (which prorates the portion of the contract affected and spreads it out over the length of the deal), but those adjustments haven't created major cap space." According to the NFLPA's web site, Smith's salary is now $525,000 so it appears that the Pats converted $375,000 of his salary into a signing bonus, saving $300,000 on Smith's 2002 cap figure while adding $75,000 to Antowain's future cap figures.
December 19, 2002 update The $500,000 option payment for 2004 due in 2003 will be prorated over 4 years (a $125,000 cap hit for 4 years). The $2 million option payment for 2005-2006 due in 2004 will be prorated over 3 years (a $666,667 cap hit for 3 years). The 2004 incentives are NTLBE, not LTBE and amount to $1,500,000, not $250,000.
July 17, 2003 update From the July 17th edition of the Boston Herald, "The Pats have seven days following the end of this season to pay Smith a $500,000 option bonus to pick up his 2004 salary ($2.4 million) and extend the contract. If the Pats don't exercise the option, Smith becomes a free agent."
November 23, 2003 update - If the Patriots do not pick up his option, Smith's 2004 cap figure will be $2,025,000, a savings of close to $1.9 million. I was mistakenly including the accleration of the $500,000 option bonus. The Pats may also get a credit for the $125,000 portion of the $500,000 option bonus that counts against the 2003 cap.
February 8, 2004 update As part of a Len Pasquarelli article - "Under terms of the existing contract, Smith would earn a base salary of $2.4 million in '04, an option that would be triggered by the $500,000 payment. He is also due a workout bonus of $105,000 and his cap charge is $3.972 million....Smith's current contract actually runs through the 2006 season and includes an even larger roster bonus next spring, of $2 million, to trigger the final two years of the deal. In 2005, he is due a base salary of $4.4 million and the base rises to $4.9 million in 2006. His current salary cap charges, respectively, for those two seasons are $5.972 million and $6.472 million.
February 9, 2004 update From the Collective Bargaining Agreement - "Credit for Signing Bonuses Refunded. In the event that a Team receives a refund from the player of any previously paid portion of a signing bonus, or the Team fails to pay any previously allocated portion of a signing bonus, such amount as has previously been included in Team Salary shall be added to the Team’s Salary Cap for the next League Year." My latest take on this is that while Antowain Smith's dead money hit is $2,025,000 the Patriots will get a $125,000 credit on the 2005 cap for the $125,000 the Patriots were charged on the 2003 cap for the prorated portion of the option bonus.

Otis Smith - - From ESPN.Com's Len Pasquarelli: "According to NFL Players Association salary documents, ends Anthony Pleasant and Bobby Hamilton and cornerback Otis Smith, all signed new contracts last week that included modest increases in their respective base salaries for the 2002 season. The adjustments cost the Patriots $860,000 in both cash and cap room. Pleasant and Hamilton received their raises in the form of advances on their new base salaries...Smith, 36, received the second biggest raise, of $300,000. His old salary for 2002 was $750,000 and the new one is $1.114 million, prorated down to $1.05 million. The raise jumps his cap value by $300,000, to $1.213 million. New England also shuffled some funds in future seasons, leaving Smith with roster bonuses of $450,000 for 2003 and $750,000 in 2004."
March 3, 2003 update Otis Smith renegotiated last September, mostly just changing some incentives. He was to have $750,000 in LTBE incentives this season, but those got changed to NLTBE incentives. He got $450,000 in NLTBE incentives added to last year (2002), plus a $450,000 roster bonus for this season -- although the roster bonus is reduced by the amount of NLTBE incentives he earned last year. He has $750,000 in NLTBE's this season and another $750,000 in 2004, with a $750,000 roster bonus in 2004 that will be reduced by the amount of incentives he earns this season. For now, his 2003 cap number is $1,368,100 ($755,000 base salary, $157,500 old signing bonus proration, $450,000 roster bonus and a $5,600 workout bonus, plus $750,000 in NLTBE incentives). But that roster bonus could be reduced once everything from 2002 is finalized and his NLTBE's are determined.
August 18, 2003 update - Otis Smith will count $157,500 against the Patriots 2004 cap.
April 15, 2004 update - Smith's $760,000 salary is eligible for the Minimum Salary Benefit for Veteran Players as laid out in the CBA extension. Therefore, Smith's salary is going to take up only $455,000 of cap space.

Jamil Soriano I found Soraino's $230,000 salary on the NFLPA site.

J.J. Stokes Stokes' $660,000 salary is eligible for the Minimum Salary Benefit for Veteran Players as laid out in the CBA extension. Therefore, Stokes' salary is going to take up only $455,000 of cap space.

Keith Traylor Michael Smith from the Boston Globe reported: "Defensive tackle Keith Traylor signed a two-year deal last week for minimum salaries ($760,000 in 2004, $765,000 in '05) and a $475,000 signing bonus."

Adam Vinatieri - ESPN.Com's Len Pasquarelli's report on Vinateiri's signing "The three-year contract that "franchise" free agent Adam Vinatieri signed on Friday does not make him the highest-paid kicker in the league but does provide the New England Patriots star a level of security rarely achieved by players at the game's most tenuous position. League sources told ESPN.com on Saturday that the contract is worth $5.375 million. Far more important than the total value, however, is that the deal is guaranteed. That virtually ensures the six-year veteran of continued employment through the 2004 season.". I am GUESSING that Adam got a $1.8 million signing bonus. His salaries for the next 3 years (750,000 in 2002, 1,400,000 in 2003, 1,425,000 in 2004) total up to be $3,575,000 - a $1.8 million signing bonus would make the deal equal the $5.375 million reported by ESPN.
December 1, 2003 update Adam's 2003 cap number is $2,320,676 ($1.4 million base salary, $666,176 signing bonus proration, $4,500 workout bonus and $250,000 incentives). Adam's 2004 cap number is $2,096,777 ($1.425 million base salary, $666,176 signing bonus proration and $5,600 workout bonus), with another $250,000 in incentives currently NLTBE.

Undrafted Free Agents signed for the rookie minimum of $230,000.

Mike Vrabel - Vrabel signed a 3-year deal getting a $225,000 signing bonus. Since he is due a $3,500,000 salary in 2003, I am expecting that he and the Pats will extend his contract before the 2003 season.
August 20, 2002 Update According to the NFLPA's web site, Vrabel is signed through the 2005 season. His new salaries are as follows: salaries: $525,000 (2002); $725,000 (2003); $800,000 (2004); $900,000 (2005)
March 3, 2003 update - Vrabel renegotiated last August, adding one year and an option year in 2005 (with a $1.5 million option bonus/buyout due sometime this season). He got a $2 million renegotiation bonus. His cap number this year is $2,055,600 ($975,000 base salary, $75,000 old signing bonus proration, $500,000 new signing bonus proration, $5,600 workout bonus, $500,000 option bonus proration and $100,000 in NLTBE incentives for making the Pro Bowl). He has roster bonuses of $1 million each due in 2004 and 2005, and the $100,000 NLTBE Pro Bowl incentive in 2004 and 2005, as well.
March 18, 2004 update - From the Boston Herald:
"Vrabel did agree to a simple restructuring that saved the Pats some cap room, as he agreed to guarantee his 2004 base salary of $1.65 million. That saved the Pats over $500,000 against the cap. Vrabel will still get a $1 million bonus this month. Vrabel's deal is set to end after the 2005 season."
March 21, 2004 update As listed on the NFLPA.Org site Vrabel's salaries are as follows: (2004 - $660,000; 2005 - $1,850,000; 2006 - $500,000; 2007 - $5,000,000) so it appears that Vrabel did extend his contract.
March 29, 2004 update A source reported that Vrabel got a two-year extension (through 2007), with his $1 million roster bonus and $990,000 of his base salary guaranteed and prorated at $497,500 per year. His cap number for 2004 is $2,163,100 -- his remaining base salary of $660,000, signing bonus proration of $1,497,500 and the standard workout bonus of $5,600. He also has a $100,000 NLTBE incentive for making the Pro Bowl. His future base salaries are $1.85 million for 2005, $500,000 for 2006 and $5 million for 2007. In 2005, he has a $1 million roster bonus, a $6,160 workout bonus and $100,000 NLTBE incentive for making the Pro Bowl. His 2005 cap number is $4,353,660. In each of 2006 and 2007, he has a $6 million roster bonus and a $6,720 workout bonus, for cap numbers of $7,004,220 and $11,504,220.

Marquise Walker I found Walker's $305,000 salary on the NFLPA site.

Ken Walter - Nick Cafardo reported on 2/24 that Ken Walter received a $600,000 signing bonus. According to the NFLPA salary search feature, here are Walter's base salaries: $700,000 (2002); $725,000 (2003); $800,000 (2004); $900,000 (2005); $1,000,000 (2006). A post to the Patriots USENET group by AdamJT13 provided the following information: - "His 2002 cap number is $925,600. He has $100,000 in LTBE incentive bonuses each season, and another $5,600 in workout bonuses each season. There are no roster or reporting bonuses in his contract."
December 14, 2003 update - When the Patriots waived Ken Walter on December 2, they caused the remaining portion of Walter's unamortized signing bonus ($360,000) to hit the 2004 cap as a "dead money" hit.

Ty Warren - ESPN.Com's John Clayton reported on 7/19 - "The New England Patriots and first-round choice Ty Warren reached agreement on a six-year deal, including escalators, which could be worth as much as $21 million. A signing bonus and a 2004 option bonus that totals more than $6 million also are included in the deal. His base salary and bonuses total more than $7 million.Warren is projected to be a starting defensive end in the Patriots' 3-4 defense. He was the 13th player selected in the draft in what was considered the best defensive-line draft in recent NFL history. The contract, which was negotiated by his agent, Kennard McGuire, was completed Saturday, four days before the opening of the Patriots training camp. There is around $7 million in escalators in the contract, more than three-quarters of them are obtainable by playing time and the remainder achievable by Pro Bowl appearances."
July 21, 2003 update - Nick Cafardo reported "No. 1 pick Ty Warren, the 13th overall selection in the April draft, was signed to a six-year deal that could be worth up to $20.3 million. The deal includes a huge payment of up to $7 million on the back side of the contract based on Warren's performance in the first five years of the deal. The Texas A&M star also received a $3 million signing bonus and a $3.5 million option bonus payable in March 2004."
July 22, 2003 update - Nick Cafardo reported:
Warren agreed to split his bonuses. He receives $2 million within three days of signing and another $1 million by Oct. 15.The deal is actually a four-year deal, but grows to six years if the Patriots pick up the options for the '07 and '08 seasons by May 31, 2004. At that point, Warren would get an additional $3.25 million in two payments and new salaries from '04 through '08. If the Patriots don't believe Warren is suitably developing after his rookie season, they can decline the options and instead pay him through 2006. His yearly salaries -- $955,000 for '04, $1.145 million in '05, and most of his $1.335 million in '06 -- would be guaranteed if the Patriots don't pick up the options. If the Patriots pick up the $3.25 million option, Warren's yearly salaries would be (after making $765,000 this season), $305,000 in '04, $495,000 in '05, $685,000 in '06, $875,000 in '07, and $1.05 million in '08, but those salaries wouldn't be guaranteed. Starting next year, Warren must pay back $100,000 per year of his bonus (up to $500,000) if he fails to complete at least 90 percent of his offseason workouts."
From ESPN.Com - "Signing bonus: $3,000,000. Base salaries: $765,000 (2003); $955,000 (2004, plus $3,250,000 option bonus); $1,145,000 (2005); $1,335,000 (2006); $875,000 (2007); $1,050,000 (2008, includes escalator). Note: If option bonus exercised, base salaries are reduced to $350,000 (2004); $495,000 (2005); $685,000 (2006). Total: six years, $10,800,000. Cap charge: $1,265,000."
June 27, 2004 updateMichael Smith of the Boston Globe reported:"Warren can increase his 2007 salary by $3.7 million and his pay n 2008 by $5.6 million through individual and team performance clauses.)"

Ben Watson -  Until Watson signs, I have decided to show what last year's 32nd pick, Tyler Brayton got - Signing bonus: $3,150,000. Base salaries: $360,000 (2003, plus $10,000 roster bonus); $450,000 (2004, plus $10,000 workout bonus); $540,000 (2005, plus $10,000 workout bonus); $630,000 (2006, plus $10,000 workout bonus); $720,000 (2007, plus $10,000 workout bonus); $810,000 (2008, plus $10,000 workout bonus, voidable). Total: six years, $6,720,000 or, if voided, five years, $5,900,000. Cap charge: $922,500.

Vince Wilfork -  Mike Reiss of The MetroWest Daily News reported that "Patriots have reached a contract agreement with first-round pick Vince Wilfork today, signing him to a six-year contract that could be worth up to $18.05 million. The contract includes $5.825 million worth of bonus money -- $3 million coming in the form of a signing bonus and $2.5 million as part of an option bonus to be paid in the first week of 2005. The deal also includes a $325,000 roster bonus for 2004. The 2005 and 2006 base salaries are guaranteed, meaning the deal includes $6.575 million worth of guaranteed money."

Eugene Wilson - ESPN.Com reported on 7/20:
"The latest to agree is cornerback Eugene Wilson, one of New England's two second-round choices and the 36th overall pick in the draft. Wilson agreed to a five-year, $3.915 million that included a $2 million signing bonus. There is an escalator for the fifth year that would increase the base salary to $3 million, based on playing time."
The Boston Globe's Nick Cafardo reported that "Wilson received a $2 million signing bonus, salaries of $274,000, $342,000, $410,000, $478,000, and $546,000, and the potential of a $3 million payment before his fifth season based on playing time and performance over the first four years."
July 25, 2003 update - From ESPN.Com "Signing bonus: $2,000,000. Base salaries: $285,000 (2003); $356,250 (2004); $427,500 (2005); $498,750 (2006); $570,000 (2007, includes escalator). Total: five years, $4,137,500. Cap charge: $685,000."
May 26, 2004 update - The following sentences in this paragraph are a paraphrase from an Adamjt13 post. Please note that the combined salaries, roster bonuses and reporting bonuses in all capped years (currently through 2006) of the contract must be at least as much as the combined prorated bonuses in capped years of the contract. If they are not, a charge, typically called the "Deion Charge" since I believe it was first applied to a Deion Sanders contract, is added in capped years to make them equal, although not more than half of the average proration can be added. The added charges in capped years are then credited back in equal portions in the uncapped years.
In Wilson's case, the combined salaries, roster bonuses and reporting bonuses for the first 4 years of his contract totaled out to $1,567,500. The combined prorated bonuses in capped years of the contract (2003-2006) totaled out to be $1,600,000. That is a $32,500 difference. There will be a $8,125 charge added to Wilson's cap numbers for the years 2003 through 2006 and then there will be a $32,500 credit subtracted from Wilson's 2007 cap number.

Antwoine Womack Signing bonus: $29,000. Base salaries: $225,000 (2002); $300,000 (2003); $380,000 (2004); and $455,000 (2005). Total: four years, $1,389,000. Cap value: $232,250.

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