It’s a solemn day for the start of the NFL, with today obviously marking the 10-year anniversary of September 11th.  Some of the headlines obviously have to do with what was a tragic day for our country, and best wishes to those of you out there who lost a loved one or a friend that day.

Steve Buckley of the Boston Herald has a good column on that topic, and feels that Patriots owner Robert Kraft’s words after Adam Vinatieri’s kick sailed through the uprights were fitting.  In the piece Kraft reveals that his wife, Myra, flew to New York from Boston that very morning.

“My sweetheart had flown down to New York that morning,” Kraft said. “She had a charity meeting in New York and she took the 7 o’clock shuttle. She was at the airport when (terrorist) Mohamed Atta was going through Logan.

“When I saw on television what was happening, I made a call to New York, to a man who helps us out driving. I asked him if he could go to the Regency Hotel and find my wife. He basically left his family and drove my wife back to Boston, and I’ll never forget him for that. It took him almost five hours just to get out of the city.”

Karen Guregian of the Herald also has a terrrific article on Kraft, who she writes obviously has mixed emotions now that his wife won’t be with him to enjoy the upcoming season.  But it’s a great read, with some terrific quotes from the owner.  In the article Kraft even talks about a young girl who sent in $127 in 5′s and 1′s from money she earned from her lemonade stand.  So be sure and check it out.

Ian Rapoport has a great  article this morning on the gradual transition to a taller defensive backfield by New England, which obviously gives them a better ability to match up against taller receivers like Brandon Marshall.

“I guess that’s what the coaches want,” Bodden said. “Bigger guys, physical guys. But everybody’s talented, everybody’s different in their own ways, so we bring a lot to the table. We just have to continue to progress and put it out there on the field.”

Rapoport also has his “notebook” which leads off with article on rookie tackle Nate Solder, who appears will get his first NFL start at right tackle against Miami tomorrow night since Sebastian Vollmer missed his fourth straight practice yesterday.

Rich Garven of the Worcester Telegram has a quote from ESPN analyst Ron Jaworski, who feels that Solder is going to be among the NFL’s great offensive lineman.

Mike Reiss of ESPNBoston.com has his “quick hit thoughts” on this Sunday morning.

Chris Forsberg of ESPNBoston.com writes that all eyes will be on New England’s tight ends tomorrow.

Shalise Manza Young of the Boston Globe has her notebook for this morning, and leads off with the fact that both Albert Haynesworth and Myron Pryor are both “questionable” for tomorrow’s game.  Haynesworth reportedly missed the practice with an illness, but it isn’t believed to be serious.

Young also has a good article on Chad Ochocinco who talked about what it was like to leave Cincinnati and arrive in “heaven”.

Greg Bedard has a good entry with Miami Herald writer Armando Salguero, who offers up some insight on the Dolphins in this entry.

Bedard’s Sunday Football Notes are quickly becoming a “must read”, and this week’s edition is also really interesting as well.  In the article Bedard goes on to predict that Jerod Mayo will win defensive player of the year, but there’s a lot of great stuff in today’s edition – so be sure and check it out.

Paul Kenyon of the Providence Journal has a good article this morning on the fact that it’s time for New England’s revamped defense to make a stand tomorrow night against Miami.

Jim Donaldson of the Journal writes that it’s not tomorrow night’s season opener that matters – but the postseason one – which he writes is the one the Patriots haven’t been able to win recently.

Brian MacPherson of the Journal writes that despite not making a preseason reception, Deion Branch isn’t worried heading into tomorrow’s game.

That’s it for this morning.  We’ll have a couple of other entries later today so be sure and check back.